Announcement: Dr. Sara Silvestri

Dear colleagues and friends:
Here is an editorial I have written for the Conversation on the unprecedented ECJ ruling on religious symbols that was published 2 days ago. It has just gone live:
And here an interview that I gave yesterday on this same topic for PBS:
Sara
Dr Sara Silvestri
Senior Lecturer
Department of International Politics
City, University of London
@Sara1Silvestri

Bourse postdoctorale – Fonds Gérard-Dion – Concours 2017 /Postdoctoral Fellowship – Fonds Gérard-Dion – 2017 edition

Le Fonds Gérard-Dion <http://www.fonds-gerard-dion.org>, consacré à la
recherche portant sur les faits religieux, invite la participation à son
concours annuel de la bourse postdoctorale. D’une durée de 12mois, la
bourse s’adresse notamment à une personne provenant de l’extérieur et
détentrice depuis moins de trois ans d’un doctorat d’une université
reconnue au Canada ou à l’étranger. Les qualités recherchées sont
l’aptitude au développement d’un projet de recherche comparée (autre pays /
Canada , Canada / Québec) et le désir de se constituer chercheur ou
chercheuse en résidence de l’Université Laval (Québec, Canada).

Pour plus ample information : www.fonds-gerard-dion.org
<http://www.fonds-gerard-dion.org/prog_aide_recherche.aspx>

*Date limite de dépôt des candidatures :  17 mars 2017. *

 

Dedicated to research on religion, ‘Fonds Gerard-Dion’
<http://www.fonds-gerard-dion.org/> currently invites applications for its
annual post-doctoral Fellowship. Eligible candidates to this twelve-month
fellowship must have obtained a PhD within the past three years from any
internationally recognized university.  Relevant qualifications are
interest in developing research project (comparative, Canada / Québec ) and
the desire to be an in-residence researcher at Université Laval in Québec
city, Canada.

For more information :   www.fonds-gerard-dion.org
<http://www.fonds-gerard-dion.org/prog_aide_recherche.aspx>

*Deadline: March 17th, 2017.*

ISA-RC22 Statement of Opposition to the U.S. Restrictions on Visas and International Travel

January 31, 2017

The Board of the International Sociological Association’s Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion expresses its opposition to the restrictions on international travel, visas, and immigration that have been imposed by the President of the United States and his administration.  We join with many other scholarly associations to protest this restriction on the free movement of people and ideas across national borders.  As scholars of religion, we particularly protest the unjust singling out of Muslims and the residents of Muslim majority countries.

As sociologists, we oppose this Executive Order because it affects our colleagues and students as well as the conditions for knowledge production. In addition, sociologists have documented and analyzed the ways in which symbolic boundaries are made more rigid and result in the social exclusion of specific groups. This Executive Order targeting specific groups of individuals has effects not only on its immediate victims, but also on how our society understands itself and its orientation toward diversity and human rights.

We are an international scholarly organization with members from all over the world.  Some of our members come from the targeted Muslim countries.  Others come from the 38 countries that are affected by the suspension of the Visa Interview Waiver Program – including members of the European Union.  Banning or hindering their travel threatens to prevent them from attending our conferences and participating in our workshops and other intellectual exchanges.  Retaliatory travel banning by the affected countries will isolate U.S. scholars as well, weakening their contribution to our society.

As scholars, we know the importance of maintaining the free flow of information and persons across national borders.  Shared knowledge helps the public understand society’s workings.  It reduces international tensions.  It reduces prejudice.  It creates stronger social institutions.  And it increases international prosperity.  The Executive Order does not increase safety; it increases discord and indeed endangers people around the world.  We call on the American government to reverse the order immediately and restore the free flow of people and ideas between the U.S. and other countries.

On behalf of the Research Committee,
James V. Spickard, PhD, President
Professor of Sociology, University of Redlands
United States of America

Click HERE to download a PDF copy

The Donner Research Prize 2016 to Anu Isotalo

The Donner Institute for Research in Religious and Cultural History in Turku has awarded Dr Anu Isotalo from the University of Turku the 2016 prize for outstanding research into religion. Dr Isotalo is awarded for her dissertation Mistä on hyvät tytöt tehty? Somlaitytöt ja maineen merkitykset [What are good girls made of? Somali girls and the meanings of reputation] 

The Donner Institute Prize is awarded annually for outstanding research into religion conducted at a Nordic university. It is intended for researchers in the field of religious studies for a significant and relatively newly published monograph or article in print or digital form. The prize sum is 5,000 Euros.

More information: http://www.abo.fi/forskning/en/News/Item/item/11884

On behalf of the Donner Institute Board,

Turku, 10 October 2016

Tage Kurtén
Chairman

Ruth Illman
Secretary

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel), Annual Conference 2017: On the Edge? Centres and Margins in the Sociology of Religion. Wednesday 12th July – Friday 14th July 2017, University of Leeds.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Bryan Turner (City University of New York)

Professor Kim Knott (University of Lancaster)

Professor Philip Mellor (University of Leeds)

(Two further keynotes, TBC)

 

The Sociology of Religion, as a distinct sub-discipline, has had a complex relationship with ‘mainstream’ sociology including experiencing periods of centrality and marginalisation. Beginning as a chief concern of the founding fathers of the discipline, but later relegated to almost insignificance until the so-called ‘resurgence of religion’, these changing fortunes have contributed directly to scholarship that can be dynamic, multi-faceted and responsive. In our search to understand the roles for religion in contemporary society, as scholars we frequently draw on multi-disciplinary methodologies and share a disciplinary platform with geography, politics, social policy, theology, anthropology, history and literature, to name but a few.  But where does this leave the sociology of religion as a distinct discipline?

The purpose of this conference is to investigate the boundaries and borders of sociologies of religion in an expansive and inclusive way. We want to ask, what do the centres of the sociology of religion look like in the 21st Century, and where are the margins and borders? Where are the new, and innovative subjects, methodologies and collaborations in our subject and how are they shaping the discipline?  How well do Sociologies of Religion intersect with other sociologies, such as of class, migration, ethnicity, sexuality and gender, and what are the effects? What about the geographical centres and margins of this historically Western-orientated sub-discipline, in our ever-changing world characterised by postcoloniality, globalisation and transnationalism? To what extent have any alternative Sociologies of Religion from the “edge”, to use a term proposed by Bender et al (2013), re-interpreted or re-configured the concerns of the centre? Importantly, what light does the Sociology of Religion shed on the more general study of centres and margins in religious and social settings/institutions and identities/subjectivities? Ultimately we want to question where these expansive and multi-directional boundaries leave us as ‘sociologists of religion’ and as a distinct study group and highlight the challenges and the opportunities.

We invite you to engage in these conference questions from your particular area of research.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

Please send abstracts to the attention of the conference organizers: Dr Caroline Starkey (University of Leeds) and Dr Jasjit Singh (University of Leeds) at socrel2017@gmail.com

 

Abstracts must be submitted by 9th December 2016.

 

Conference Bursaries:

A limited number of bursaries are available to support postgraduate, early career, low income or unwaged SocRel members to present at the conference. Please visit http://socrel.org.uk/socrel-annual-bursary-scheme/ for instructions, and to download an application form, and submit your bursary application along with your abstract by 9th December 2016.

All presenters must be members of SocRel.

Selected authors will be asked to contribute to an edited volume.

 

Key Dates:

Abstract submission: Open now

Early bird registration opens: 3rd October 2016

Abstract submission closes: 9th December 2016

Decision notification: 20th January 2017

Presenter registration closes: 10th March 2017

Early bird registration closes:  2nd June 2017

Registration closes: 23rd June 2017

Please note that after Friday, 23rd June 2017, a £50 late registration fee will apply to all bookings.

 

Should you have other questions about the conference please also contact the conference organisers, Dr Caroline Starkey (University of Leeds) and Dr Jasjit Singh (University of Leeds) at socrel2017@gmail.com.

For further details, visit the SocRel website: www.socrel.org.uk. For further details about the BSA visit www.britsoc.co.uk.

Link to online CfP: http://socrel.org.uk/sociology-of-religion-study-group-socrel-annual-conference-2017/

SISR/ISSR July 2017 Conference moved to Lausanne; Call for Session Proposals Extended to October 25th

Dear Colleagues:

We are writing to let you know that the SISR/ISSR Executive has made the decision to hold the 2017 conference in Lausanne, Switzerland from 4-7 July 2017, instead of in Melbourne Australia. Only very recently has it become clear that a conference in Melbourne would not be possible for financial reasons. The Executive has had to decide quickly in order to be able to guarantee a conference in 2017.  

We thank the Australian local committee and its president, Bob Dixon, for their efforts and energy and we will be able to use a considerable amount of their work for the Lausanne conference. We also hope that a ISSR conference in Australia will be possible some time in the future.

The conference in Lausanne will keep the theme “Religion, Cooperation, and Conflict in Diverse Societies”.

Because of the relocation, we make a second call for session proposals to give members a chance who would consider coming to Lausanne but would not have been able to go to Melbourne.

You can again propose until October 25th:

  • Thematic session – A session with papers on a common theme. If the theme attracts many papers, the thematic session may stretch over several slots.
  • Working Group session – A session of papers presented by those who work together on a specific project.
  • New Research Forum – Intended for students and young researchers (PhDs). The NRF usually have two sessions with a common theme and a session for free papers that do not fit into     the other ISSR thematic sessions.
  • Author Meets Critics session – A session in which an author meets scholars who criticize his/her book and responds.

The conference is bilingual.  Sessions may be in French, in English, or both.

Please submit your session proposals via our system: http://sisr-issr-conference-submission-2017.com/index.php/test/rccds2017   Before doing so, please consult instructions for conference submissions: https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conference/instructions-for-registration-on-the-open-conference-system-religion-cooperation-and-conflict-in-diverse-societies

Attention: This is not yet the call for individual paper proposals. The call for paper proposals will be opened in mid-November.

This is a late change of plans and we apologize for any inconvenience to our members. We are convinced, however, that the ISSR conference at the new venue in Lausanne will be a success and we hope very much to meet you there.

With best wishes,

Jörg Stolz
President of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion

ISA-RC22 Newsletter #14–September, 2016

The ISA’s Research Committee 22 (Sociology of Religion) has just issued its 14th newsletter.  It is available on the RC22 website at: http://www.isa-rc22.org/newsletters/  It contains a report from the recent ISA 3rd Forum of Sociology (in Vienna), news about the next ISA World Congress, a guide to how to publish in ISA journals (by one of the journal editors), a report on the state of sociology of religion in Latin America, and a discussion-starter about the current state of theory in the sociology of religion.

Click the picture to download a copy.

Issue 14

(For those who don’t know, RC22 hosts this news and events blog.)

Jim Spickard
RC22 President
University of Redlands
president@isa-rc22.org

Calling All Scholars of Religion: A (Free) Invitation to Comment on a Paper Summarizing the Role of Religion in the Contemporary World

Dear RC22 Colleagues (and others who are on this mailing list)

We need your help commenting on a paper, which we — Grace Davie (University of Exeter, UK) and Nancy Ammerman (Boston University, US), and a team of twelve have prepared for the International Panel on Social Progress.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce the International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP). You can find more about the IPSP and its ways of working here: https://www.ipsp.org/.  You will see that it exists to:

  • “harness the competence of hundreds of experts about social issues” and to
  • “deliver a report addressed to all social actors, movements, organizations, politicians and decision-makers, in order to provide them with the best expertise on questions that bear on social change”.

We and our team have written the chapter on religion, entitled ‘Religions and social progress: Critical assessments and creative partnerships’.  

Here is our Abstract:

  • This chapter starts from the premise that some 80 percent of the world’s population affirms some kind of religious identification, a proportion that is growing rather than declining. Emphasizing the significance of belief and practice in everyday lives and local contexts, we analyze the impact of religion and its relevance to social progress in a wide variety of fields. These include the family, gender and sexuality; differences and diversity; democratic governance; violence and peace-making; health and economic well-being; and care for the earth.
  • We argue that researchers and policy makers pursuing social progress will benefit from careful attention to the power of religious ideas to motivate, of religious practices to shape ways of life, of religious communities to mobilize and extend the reach of social change, and of religious leaders and symbols to legitimate calls to action. All of that, however, can be put to either good or ill, for which reason assessment of particular religions in specific contexts is essential.

Running through the chapter are five interconnected themes:

  1. the persistence of religion in the twenty-first century;
  2. the importance of context in discerning outcomes;
  3. the need for cultural competence relative to religion;
  4. the significance of religion in initiating change;
  5. and the benefits of well-judged partnerships.

The continuing need for critical but appreciative assessment and the demonstrable benefits of creative partnerships are our standout findings.

The IPSP process – see https://www.ipsp.org/process – mirrors that of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and includes a period of public comment in the autumn of 2016.  The ‘Commenting Platform’ is now open – see comment.ipsp.org

It would be hugely helpful if members of RC22 could take part in this.

The IPSP website will indicate how you access our chapter and how you make your comments.  Or if you prefer you can simply send us (g.r.c.davie@exeter.ac.uk; nta@bu.edu) an e-mail.

International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP)

Dear SISR Colleagues

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce the International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP). You can find more about the IPSP and its ways of working here: https://www.ipsp.org/. You will see that it exists to ‘harness the competence of hundreds of experts about social issues’ and to ‘deliver a report addressed to all social actors, movements, organizations, politicians and decision-makers, in order to provide them with the best expertise on questions that bear on social change’.

We Grace Davie (University of Exeter, UK) and Nancy Ammerman (Boston University, US), are the Coordinating Lead Authors (CLAs) for the chapter on religion, entitled ‘Religions and social progress: Critical assessments and creative partnerships’. Altogether we are a team of twelve. Here is our Abstract:

This chapter starts from the premise that some 80 percent of the world’s population affirms some kind of religious identification, a proportion that is growing rather than declining. Emphasizing the significance of belief and practice in everyday lives and local contexts, we analyze the impact of religion and its relevance to social progress in a wide variety of fields. These include the family, gender and sexuality; differences and diversity; democratic governance; violence and peace-making; health and economic well-being; and care for the earth.

We argue that researchers and policy makers pursuing social progress will benefit from careful attention to the power of religious ideas to motivate, of religious practices to shape ways of life, of religious communities to mobilize and extend the reach of social change, and of religious leaders and symbols to legitimate calls to action. All of that, however, can be put to either good or ill, for which reason assessment of particular religions in specific contexts is essential.

Running through the chapter are five interconnected themes: the persistence of religion in the twenty-first century; the importance of context in discerning outcomes; the need for cultural competence relative to religion; the significance of religion in initiating change; and the benefits of well-judged partnerships. The continuing need for critical but appreciative assessment and the demonstrable benefits of creative partnerships are our standout findings.

The IPSP process – see https://www.ipsp.org/process – mirrors that of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and includes a period of public comment in the autumn of 2016. The ‘Commenting Platform’ is now open – see comment.ipsp.org. It would be hugely helpful if members of SISR could take part in this. The IPSP website will indicate how you access our chapter and how you make your comments. Or if you prefer you can simply send us (g.r.c.davie@exeter.ac.uk; nta@bu.edu) an e-mail.

Parution du No 33 de RELIGIOLOGIQUES

La revue québécoise de sciences humaines, *RELIGIOLOGIQUES*, qui
s’intéresse aux manifestations du sacré dans la culture ainsi qu’au
phénomène religieux sous toutes ses formes, a le plaisir de vous annoncer
la publication du numéro 33 (printemps 2016) intitulé, « Mutations :
croyances et pratiques religieuses migrantes ». Les textes son disponibles
(dans leur intégralité) sur le site Internet de la revue.

Roxanne D. Marcotte, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
Pour le comité de rédaction de * RELIGIOLOGIQUES*

*RELIGIOLOGIQUES, no 33, **printemps 2016 *
Mutations : croyances et pratiques religieuses migrantes
Sous la direction scientifique de Roxanne D. MARCOTTE
http://www.religiologiques.uqam.ca/

SOMMAIRE
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
– – – – – – – – – – – – –
PRÉSENTATION

Roxanne D. MARCOTTE
Perspectives sur les nouvelles modalités des croyances et pratiques
religieuses migrantes

ARTICLES

Christophe MONNOT
Institutionnalisation des pratiques collectives bouddhistes et hindoues en
Suisse

Hicham BENAISSA
Le « prêt à intérêt » ou la pratique économique symbolique  d’une économie
des pratiques

Béatrice HALSOUET
Des réfugiés népalo-bhoutanais au Québec : comment être hindou dans une
ville moyenne, en région ?

Elisabeth MAREELS
Des portes de la ville à la conquête des nations : spiritualisation du
local et du global chez les pentecôtistes brésiliens de Bruxelles

Francesco PIRAINO
L’héritage de René Guénon dans le soufisme du XXIe siècle en France et en
Italie

Felicia DUMAS
Retransmission numérique de la Divine Liturgie et le confort du croire