Call for Papers: Review of Religious Research

Review of Religious Research (RRR) publishes empirical social-science research on religion, primarily in sociology and social psychology, and scholarly literature reviews of religious research in these fields.

In keeping with its mission, the Religious Research Association (RRA), which sponsors RRR, encourages research that has practical implications for denominations and religious bodies.

RRR provides a forum for applied and academic research across multiple disciplines and approaches, including research on the following topical areas: Clergy; Church programs; Comparative analyses of religious denominations and institutions; Denominational and congregational growth, decline, and vitality; Denominational and congregational conflict, competition, and cooperation; Ethnicity/race and religion; Generational and personal religious change; New religious movements; Personal spiritual and religious beliefs and practices; Religion and attitudes; Religion and family; Religion and gender, Religion and social behavior; Religion and well-being; and Research methodology.

Four types of articles are included in this Call for Papers:

  • Original Research Articles
  • Research Notes
  • Review Articles, and
  • Applied Research Abstracts.

Original Research Article: This type of article must be a scholarly and methodologically sophisticated empirical study that provides a comprehensive literature review of the relevant topics related to the research question, and it should have a strong theoretical foundation. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 10,000 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Research Note: This type of article must also be a scholarly and methodologically sophisticated empirical study, but its research question does not have to be theory based, and its literature review should be shorter and more focused. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 7,500 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Review Article: Authors should send an email directly to the RRR Editor-in-Chief (kjflannelly@gmail.com) describing the nature and scope of a proposed literature review to see if it is suitable for publication in RRR before they submit it. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. The manuscript should also contain a methodology section that explains how the literature search was conducted and how articles were selected for inclusion in the review. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 10,000 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Applied Research Abstract: This type of article consists of a 350-550 word summary (without any references) of an applied research study in the form of a structured abstract with the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, followed by 3-4 keywords. The author(s) may include a footnote that states: (a) whether a complete report exists and how it can be obtained; (b) whether the raw data are available in electronic form and how they can be obtained if the authors wish to make them available to other researchers; and/or (c) whether the authors would like to collaborate with other researchers to further analyze the data and write a full report for possible journal publication as a peer-reviewed manuscript.

GUIDELINES

  • Statistical Methodology – Original Research Articles/Research Notes: Quantitative studies should use the most appropriate statistical procedures needed to answer the research question, which include adequate statistical controls (e.g., using demographic variables as covariates that are known to be associated with the religious variables in the study).
  • Sampling Methodology – Original Research Articles/Research Notes: Both quantitative and qualitative studies should meet sociological standards of representativeness (RRR does not publish studies based solely on convenience sampling). Therefore, qualitative studies published in RRR must employ more systematic and representative approaches to sampling than most qualitative studies do. Convenience sampling can only be employed during the last step in the sampling process, usually after (a) drawing random samples from national or regional surveys, or datasets maintained by religious or other kinds of organizations, or (b) sampling congregations from different cities, states, or regions, or (c) selecting church programs, denominations, congregations, or other social groups that meet specified inclusion criteria.

Editorial Decision-making Process

All four types of manuscripts are initially read by the Editor-in-Chief to determine if they are generally appropriate for publication in RRR based on the guidelines described in this Call for Papers. All manuscripts that are deemed to be appropriate, except Applied Research Abstracts, then undergo blind peer-review by two or more qualified researchers. The Editor-in-Chief is solely responsible for publication decisions about Applied Research Abstracts. Editorial decisions are based on whether a manuscript: (a) poses a clear and valid research question; (b) makes a meaningful contribution to the field; (c) provides appropriate evidence or reasoning for its conclusions; (d) is written in an intelligible fashion in standard English; and (e) conforms to the guidelines described herein.

Your manuscript should be submitted at https://www.editorialmanager.com/rorr/default.aspx

After you login and select “New Manuscript Submission,” you need to select the appropriate type of article and follow the rest of the directions.

Manuscript Submission and Processing Fee: Authors who are not RRA members are required to pay a $35 manuscript processing fee before their manuscript undergoes peer-review. This fee can be paid by joining the RRA, whose annual membership is $35.

  • Authors must submit a cover letter with their submission that covers: (a) RRA membership and this fee; (b) the topical areas with which the manuscript fits; (c) and some other items about the manuscript.
  • Please see the “Cover Letter” and “Fee” sections of the RRR “Instructions for Authors” for more details (https://www.springer.com/journal/13644/submission-guidelines#Instructions%20for%20authors ), including examples of cover letters.

Call for Articles for a Thematic Issue of Religion

Working titles (comments/suggestions welcome):

Emic Categories and New Paths / Case Studies in the Scholarly Use of Indigenous Concepts

Religion invites contributions for a thematic issue consisting of case studies of concepts from non-prominent cultures (not just religions) that have been or could be useful in the study of religion/s. Is there a blindspot, lacuna or distortion in the study of religion/s that can be highlighted or addressed by a term from a tradition that you study? Does a particular concept from your materials/data/fieldwork move past our existing vocabulary or contribute to current debates? Is our discipline missing key terms for specific areas of research – material culture, views of selfhood, non-binary categories, dynamic and non-essentialist views of pluralisms etc. – and where might these be found? On the negative side, have classic appropriations of certain insider concepts created more problems than they are worth (god, guru, hell, liturgy, mana, shaman)? Within the academy, are there terms used in non-English language scholarship, beyond the North-Atlantic axis (or even within, e.g., evangelical Christianity and other well-studied traditions), that can contribute to our discipline (e.g., emerging emic concepts, indigenous methods or southern theory)? Each article will discuss a single concept (or two or three closely related terms), spelling out the significance of the term in its home context, contribution to the study of religions, and a critical assessment of existing uses (if any) in the relevant scholarly literatures. Final length: 5000–10000 words, all-inclusive.

Please send a brief proposal or outline (500–1200 words) by February 1, 2021. Proposed submission deadline: Sept 1, 2021. Web copy of this call: https://stevenengler.ca/cfp/ Questions and comments: sengler@mtroyal.ca

Ecclesiology and Ethnography Network

Dear EE Friends,
We should be gathering in Durham for our annual conference this week! We are mourning the loss of gathering in person, but in this newsletter you will find opportunity to remain engaged in our network in a variety of ways.
First, you will find links to a podcast series featuring Dr. Pete Ward hosted by Dr. Eileen Campbell-Reed on the E&E website.
And below, you’ll see a book launch from Dr. Clare Watkins and a chance to participate in a lively event through Lived Catholicism.
Although we can’t be together this week we are grateful to extend these resources to you on behalf of our network. Take courage and stay healthy!

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We’re proud to announce the publication of Dr. Clare Watkin’s new book, Disclosing Church: An Ecclesiology Learned from Conversations in Practice. You are invited to the virtual book launch event on Wednesday, 23 September, at 4:00 p.m. (UK), at which you will hear more about the book from Clare and a response by Dr. Jonas Ideström.
Register through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/book-launch-disclosing-church-by-clare-watkins-tickets-118617410869

View this email in your browser

Call for Papers: "Digitalization of society and the future of Christianity”

Dear colleagues!

We invite you to participate in the VII International Conference of the Faculty of Social Sciences of the Orthodox St. Tikhon’s University for the Humanities “Digitalization of society and the future of Christianity. On the issue of transformation of the value-normative system of the society”.

During the conference, it is proposed to address the following issues:

  1. problems of digitalization in the light of the Christian future world;
  2. philosophical and anthropological understanding of the place of Christianity in the digital future of society;
  3. value-normative system and technological development (technology);
  4. Christian culture in the era of digitalization;
  5. virtual worlds and the spiritual world of Christianity: the conflict of meanings;
  6. Christianity and the transformation of the value bases of power in a digital society;
  7. digital religions in the light of the Christian tradition;
  8. regional features of the Christian world in the digital age.

Articles of all speakers of the conference will be published in its final collection.

Applications for participation and abstracts (approximately 80 words) are accepted until November 1, 2020 at digitalization.pstgu2021@gmail.com

It is possible face-to-face or remote speech at the conference. The form of the speech should be written in the application.

Conference working languages: Russian and English.

Time and place of the conference:
On February 18-19, 2021, 10.00-17.00.
6 Likhov pereulok, Moscow

Call for Papers: British Muslims and Covid-19: Impacts, Experiences and Responses

8th December 2020     

A free MBRN online symposium

Last date for submission of abstracts: 30th October 2020

http://www.mbrn.org.uk/call-for-papers-british-muslims-and-covid-19-impacts-experiences-and-responses/

Research on Covid-19 has highlighted its disproportionate impact on Black and Asian Minority Ethnic groups (BAME) communities (Public Health England, 2020). However, these studies only offer a limited understanding of the particularity of experiences within the umbrella category BAME. For instance, there is only limited discussion around faith in relation to Covid-19, its impacts and the socio-economic fall-outs of lockdown. This MBRN symposium will redress this gap by taking an intersectional perspective in mapping and analysing the impact of Covid-19 on British Muslim communities. By bringing together practitioners and academics, we will examine how diverse British Muslim communities have experienced the pandemic, how their lives have been impacted during and after lockdown and how they responded.

During the lockdown, we have witnessed unprecedented impacts on British Muslims including the closing of mosques and madrassas, cancellation of Friday congregational prayers, Ramadan in lock-down and a significantly limited Hajj. Muslim faith and community leader have played important roles in translating theological rulings into practical guidance, which have largely been adhered to within Muslim communities. Similarly, children and young Muslims, like all young people have experienced the impact of Covid-19 in relation to their education (Children’s Commissioner, 2020). High levels of socio-economic disadvantage amongst British Muslim households mean that we can expect a disproportionate effect of lockdown and Covid-19 on British Muslims. Home learning during school closure, for instance, brought to the surface as well as enhanced the disparities in access to education for disadvantaged pupils, especially those who are known to be at risk of falling behind such as British Muslim pupils.

By focusing on the experiences of British Muslims, this online symposium will enable us to examine the interplay of ethnicity, religion and deprivation, in negotiating the particular challenges of living through Covid-19. It will explore the diversity of ways in which British Muslims have experienced and responded to Covid-19, and seek to understand its ongoing impacts. Our aim is to suggest answers for the question, “How are diverse British Muslims living through, and responding to the challenges of, Covid-19?”.

We invite proposals for papers that explore any dimension of Muslim identity / lived experiences in relation to the pandemic, lockdown and subsequent socio-economic implications of Covid-19 in Britain. We hope that the symposium will attract academics and practitioners from a range of epistemological positions and disciplinary standpoints. Possible themes and topics include (but not limited to):

  • · the intersections of religion, ethnicity and gender in experiences of and responses to Covid-19
  • · inclusion and critical engagement of religion as part of the national response to Covid-19
  • · disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on British Muslim communities
  • · racism and prejudice (including Islamophobia) linked to Covid-19
  • · responses of British Muslim charitable and volunteering organisations
  • · responses of British Muslim faith leaders and scholars
  • · support for bereaved families
  • · Islamic theological perspectives on quarantine
  • · impact on lived experiences British Muslim families (home-schooling, multi-generational families)
  • · media representations of Muslims in relation to Covid-19
  • · counter-terrorism and surveillance during a pandemic
  • · the negotiation of cultural, religious and moral values while socially-distancing
  • · the role of young people in shaping the British Muslim responses to Covid-19
  • · methodological reflections on working with Muslims during the pandemic

To submit a proposal:

  • · Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words together with names and short biographies (150 words) of the presenter/s, institutional affiliation/s (if relevant), and contact details.
  • · We also welcome proposals from postgraduate researchers, independent scholars and practitioners.
  • · Proposals should be sent to MuslimsinBritainRN@gmail.com
  • · Academic enquiries should be sent to Dr. Khadijah Elshayyal, khadijah@iga-cis.org
  • · Deadline: 5pm on Friday 30th October 2020
  • · Successful presenters will be notified by Friday 6th November 2020

Registration

· This is a free event, further details about the registration process will be circulated and posted on the MBRN website soon

Conference Organisers

Dr Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor (Chair), Dr Khadijah Elshayyal (General Secretary), Dr Sufyan Dogra, Sadiya Ahmed, Dr Jawiria Naseem and Dr Asma Khan (Committee Members)

MBRN Executive Committee

https://www.mbrn.org.uk/committee/ Twitter: @MuslimsInBritRN; www.facebook.com/muslimsinbritainresearchnetwork/

Funding Opportunity: Research on Muslim Women’s Experiences of Maternity Care

About MWNUK

Muslim Women’s Network UK (MWNUK) is a small charity (no.1155092) that works to improve social justice and equality for Muslim women and girls. We find out about their experiences through research and helpline enquiries. We identify policy and practice gaps and use this information to influence political decision makers and inform our community campaigns. We also develop resources and train women, so they are better aware of their rights. 

About the Research

MWNUK has secured funding from the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation to undertake research into Muslim women’s experiences of maternity care in England.

Research Aim

The aim of this research is to develop an in-depth understanding of the experiences of Muslim women who have accessed maternity care in the last five years in England. The main objective when analysing their experiences is to find out whether the women felt they were subjected to discriminatory attitudes and behaviours, what this looked like to them and how they felt it impacted on their health care (e.g. whether it could be contributing to increased maternal mortality and morbidity) so that lessons can be learned to mitigate existing inequalities.  

Background to the Research

The deep inequalities in maternity care and outcomes in England are well documented. Black women are 4-5 times more likely to die during pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period than White women, while for Asian women it is 2-3 times more likely to be the case. A number of factors may contribute to poorer care and outcomes for certain groups of women. These include biological factors (e.g. individual physiologies or specific underlying health conditions among women from racialised minorities); structural inequalities impacting on socio-economic status, levels of education and thus capacity to communicate effectively; poor maternity practices and discriminatory attitudes among health professionals; insecure migration status leading to delays in seeking help. All of these can increase the risk of complications and limit access to ante-natal care and information. However, all women regardless of their social background or location should receive equally high standards of care. 

In this research, we focus on women’s experiences of discrimination and bias because it is essential that service providers understand what this looks like so that bespoke training can be developed to challenge / change attitudes as opposed to generic equality, diversity and inclusion training.

Research Questions

When gathering in depth information from Muslim women, questions will be designed to elicit the following information:

  • If and how experiences vary according to differing ethnicities (with a focus on Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Indian and Black African and African-Caribbean backgrounds), educational levels, ages, language needs and migration status;
  • If and how experiences vary according to types of maternity care e.g. antenatal advice / care; care during birth; and post-natal advice / care;
  • Perceptions of how they are dealt with by and attitudes of different healthcare practitioners
  • The standard of care received;
  • Mental health impact of experiences i.e. how it made the women feel, including whether their experiences affected their further engagement with health service professionals;
  • Perceptions of physical health impacts including: complications, traumatic births; impact on mother and baby’s health

Research Time-Table

We estimate that this research will take approximately 6 months:

  • October 2020 – desk research on BAME women’s maternal health and analysis of the results of the online survey to be conducted by MWN among Muslim women who have accessed maternity care in England over the last 5 years
  • November 2020 – interview women
  • December 2020 /January 2021 – interview women
  • January / February 2021 – analysis of interview data
  • February / March 2021– first draft of report
  • April / May 2021 – final report

Research Location

Although MWNUK is based in Birmingham, the researcher will be expected to work from home and will conduct telephone or video interviews with women across England.

Applicant Profile

We invite suitably qualified individuals to apply such as those with research experience, preferably to PhD standard and who have experience of interviewing women from Black Asian Minority Ethnic backgrounds. The ability to speak a South Asian language (preferably Urdu or Punjabi) is desirable. The post is open to women only, as it is an occupational requirement that the post be held by a woman (Schedule 9, Part 1, Paragraph 1, Equality Act 2010).

Application Time-Table

  • Deadlines for Applications: 12 noon Monday 28th September 2020
  • Interviews: Week beginning 5th October 2020

Remuneration and Scope of Work to be Covered

The researcher will be self-employed and will be paid £12,600 for the research and report which will include:

  • Analysing an online survey on Muslim women’s maternity experiences
  • Contacting women and arranging about 35 interviews
  • Analysing the interviews
  • Writing a draft followed by a final report

Note:  Although MWN will identify the women to be interviewed, the researcher may be required to provide some support to identify women for the research.

How to Apply

Please submit a cover letter explaining why you are interested in carrying out this research, strengths you can bring to this piece of work and experience you have of working with and conducting research about women from racialised minorities. Cover letters should be a maximum of 3 sides of A4. Please send these to contact@mwnuk.co.uk.  By 12 noon  Monday 28th September 2020.

Online Lecture: The Religious and Secular Sources of Democracy and Nationalism:A Conversation with Craig Calhoun

Craig Calhoun speaking at a strategy workshop in 2017.

August 27, 2020
12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. EDT RSVP Required
Location: Online Zoom Webinar

Craig Calhoun is an American sociologist who has had a long and esteemed career. In his role as head of the Social Science Research Council, he co-edited and promoted important works on religion and secularism, including Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age. His own work has included a focus on these topics as well, including how forces of secularism and religion have contributed to political and cultural transformations. As director of the London School of Economics he helped inaugurate their Religion and Global Society program.

This conversation will build on three others in the Global Religious and Secular Dynamic Discussion Series, including the inaugural talk with Charles Taylor. Calhoun will join Berkley Center Senior Fellow José Casanova to discuss debates on nationalism and cosmopolitanism, receding hopes for a global fourth wave of democracy and specifically for democratization in China, and the COVID-19 pandemic and the contemporary global condition, with a special attention to its effects on universities and social science research.

This event is co-sponsored by Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs and Reset Dialogues on Civilizations.

The Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 10:00 a.m. EDT on August 27 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and posted to this page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted.

Call for Papers: Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Call for Papers: 45th Annual Conference of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion (AASR)

The Australian Association for the Study of Religion (AASR) has been fostering the development of high quality scholarship on religion since its establishment in 1975, seeking to create a strong sense of community and mutual opportunity for established and emerging voices across Australia and the wider Asia-Pacific region.

In this current time of crisis, in which community is at a premium, the AASR will meet online for our 45th annual conference, joined by our colleagues from the New Zealand Association for the Study of Religions. Current and prospective AASR and NZASR members are warmly encouraged to apply to present their ongoing research in any field of the study of religion. Meeting in Zoom webinars on 11-12 December 2020, the conference program will highlight the strength and diversity of the study of religion, in Australia and New Zealand especially, expanding networks of scholarship and support.

In this current time of crisis, in which community is at a premium, the AASR will meet online for our 45th annual conference, joined by our colleagues from the New Zealand Association for the Study of Religions. Current and prospective AASR and NZASR members are warmly encouraged to apply to present their ongoing research in any field of the study of religion. Meeting in Zoom webinars on 11-12 December 2020, the conference program will highlight the strength and diversity of the study of religion, in Australia and New Zealand especially, expanding networks of scholarship and support.

We particularly welcome PhD students and will be hosting specific events targeted towards creating connections across disciplines and universities during the conference for Higher Degree Researchers and early career academics.

We welcome both individual papers as well as panel submissions relevant to religion. Proposals can be submitted in the traditional panel format as well as roundtable discussions, information sessions and interactive media. In addition, presentations which focus on methods and tools on teaching and learning in an online environment in higher education are encouraged.

Proposals of up to 300 words and additional questions may be sent to aasrconference2020@gmail.com until 31 October 2020, to be reviewed on an ongoing basis by members of the AASR executive. Please include relevant affiliation and contact information in a single Word Document or PDF. Panel proposals should be submitted as a single document with a short abstract for the panel as well as individual abstracts and author information. Panels may consist of 3 or 4 participants. Paper presentations should be no longer than 15 minutes.

All presenters will be required to be members of the AASR by 30 November 2020. NZASR members and PhD candidates at Australian and New Zealand universities are exempt from this requirement.

Membership details are available on the AASR website via this link.

Specific technical information and timings will follow closer to the conference date and will be updated on our conference webpage.

Grant program: Integrating Social Science within African Theology

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The Nagel Institute, with generous support from the Templeton Religion Trust, invites project proposals for “Engaging African Realities: Integrating Social Science within African Theology.” Its aim is to support African theologians to engage in fresh social scientific integrated approaches with the goal of producing creative and original projects in grounded theology. We understand grounded theology as an attempt at realizing the potential of theological creativity from the bottom-up, as opposed to a top-down approach. The project seeks to emphasize how grounded theology is compatible with grounded theory in social sciences as a method for seeking hidden patterns and meanings through ethnography, a way to unearth stories and enable answers to questions from African realities. The 12 awards, of not more than $50,000 USD each, will enable grantees to participate in three intensive workshops on social science theory, methods and skills needed for grounded theology, and provide support for research on one of two topical areas:

  • African traditional values and spirituality with reference to religious experience
  • Religious innovation and competition focusing on African resources for innovation

Visit nagelinstitute.org for a comprehensive list of key questions and complete RFP instructions.
Proposals accepted in English, French, or Portuguese.

Applications by 15 September, 2020
Full Proposals (by invitation only) 1 December, 2020