ISA-RC22 Newsletter #14–September, 2016

The ISA’s Research Committee 22 (Sociology of Religion) has just issued its 14th newsletter.  It is available on the RC22 website at: http://www.isa-rc22.org/newsletters/  It contains a report from the recent ISA 3rd Forum of Sociology (in Vienna), news about the next ISA World Congress, a guide to how to publish in ISA journals (by one of the journal editors), a report on the state of sociology of religion in Latin America, and a discussion-starter about the current state of theory in the sociology of religion.

Click the picture to download a copy.

Issue 14

(For those who don’t know, RC22 hosts this news and events blog.)

Jim Spickard
RC22 President
University of Redlands
president@isa-rc22.org

Deadline for SISR/ISSR Session Proposals is September 15th

We kindly remind you that the deadline for submitting sessions proposals for the next ISSR conference “Religion, Cooperation, and Conflict in Diverse Societies”, Melbourne, Australia, 3-7 July, 2017  is 15th September 2016.

You can find more information on the conference and on proposing a Thematic Session on the ISSR web-site: https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conference/conference-2017-religion-cooperation-and-conflict-in-diverse-societies.

Please note that only members in good standing can be session organizers. You may pay your membership for the 2016-2017 period following this link: https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/membership

The ISSR published also the Call for the ISSR Workshop Grant and the Call for the Best Book Award:https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/awards-and-grant The deadline for both Calls is 15th September 2016 as well.

Kind regards,

Siniša Zrinščak

ISSR General Secretary

Calling All Scholars of Religion: A (Free) Invitation to Comment on a Paper Summarizing the Role of Religion in the Contemporary World

Dear RC22 Colleagues (and others who are on this mailing list)

We need your help commenting on a paper, which we — Grace Davie (University of Exeter, UK) and Nancy Ammerman (Boston University, US), and a team of twelve have prepared for the International Panel on Social Progress.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce the International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP). You can find more about the IPSP and its ways of working here: https://www.ipsp.org/.  You will see that it exists to:

  • “harness the competence of hundreds of experts about social issues” and to
  • “deliver a report addressed to all social actors, movements, organizations, politicians and decision-makers, in order to provide them with the best expertise on questions that bear on social change”.

We and our team have written the chapter on religion, entitled ‘Religions and social progress: Critical assessments and creative partnerships’.  

Here is our Abstract:

  • This chapter starts from the premise that some 80 percent of the world’s population affirms some kind of religious identification, a proportion that is growing rather than declining. Emphasizing the significance of belief and practice in everyday lives and local contexts, we analyze the impact of religion and its relevance to social progress in a wide variety of fields. These include the family, gender and sexuality; differences and diversity; democratic governance; violence and peace-making; health and economic well-being; and care for the earth.
  • We argue that researchers and policy makers pursuing social progress will benefit from careful attention to the power of religious ideas to motivate, of religious practices to shape ways of life, of religious communities to mobilize and extend the reach of social change, and of religious leaders and symbols to legitimate calls to action. All of that, however, can be put to either good or ill, for which reason assessment of particular religions in specific contexts is essential.

Running through the chapter are five interconnected themes:

  1. the persistence of religion in the twenty-first century;
  2. the importance of context in discerning outcomes;
  3. the need for cultural competence relative to religion;
  4. the significance of religion in initiating change;
  5. and the benefits of well-judged partnerships.

The continuing need for critical but appreciative assessment and the demonstrable benefits of creative partnerships are our standout findings.

The IPSP process – see https://www.ipsp.org/process – mirrors that of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and includes a period of public comment in the autumn of 2016.  The ‘Commenting Platform’ is now open – see comment.ipsp.org

It would be hugely helpful if members of RC22 could take part in this.

The IPSP website will indicate how you access our chapter and how you make your comments.  Or if you prefer you can simply send us (g.r.c.davie@exeter.ac.uk; nta@bu.edu) an e-mail.

International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP)

Dear SISR Colleagues

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce the International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP). You can find more about the IPSP and its ways of working here: https://www.ipsp.org/. You will see that it exists to ‘harness the competence of hundreds of experts about social issues’ and to ‘deliver a report addressed to all social actors, movements, organizations, politicians and decision-makers, in order to provide them with the best expertise on questions that bear on social change’.

We Grace Davie (University of Exeter, UK) and Nancy Ammerman (Boston University, US), are the Coordinating Lead Authors (CLAs) for the chapter on religion, entitled ‘Religions and social progress: Critical assessments and creative partnerships’. Altogether we are a team of twelve. Here is our Abstract:

This chapter starts from the premise that some 80 percent of the world’s population affirms some kind of religious identification, a proportion that is growing rather than declining. Emphasizing the significance of belief and practice in everyday lives and local contexts, we analyze the impact of religion and its relevance to social progress in a wide variety of fields. These include the family, gender and sexuality; differences and diversity; democratic governance; violence and peace-making; health and economic well-being; and care for the earth.

We argue that researchers and policy makers pursuing social progress will benefit from careful attention to the power of religious ideas to motivate, of religious practices to shape ways of life, of religious communities to mobilize and extend the reach of social change, and of religious leaders and symbols to legitimate calls to action. All of that, however, can be put to either good or ill, for which reason assessment of particular religions in specific contexts is essential.

Running through the chapter are five interconnected themes: the persistence of religion in the twenty-first century; the importance of context in discerning outcomes; the need for cultural competence relative to religion; the significance of religion in initiating change; and the benefits of well-judged partnerships. The continuing need for critical but appreciative assessment and the demonstrable benefits of creative partnerships are our standout findings.

The IPSP process – see https://www.ipsp.org/process – mirrors that of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and includes a period of public comment in the autumn of 2016. The ‘Commenting Platform’ is now open – see comment.ipsp.org. It would be hugely helpful if members of SISR could take part in this. The IPSP website will indicate how you access our chapter and how you make your comments. Or if you prefer you can simply send us (g.r.c.davie@exeter.ac.uk; nta@bu.edu) an e-mail.

Parution du No 33 de RELIGIOLOGIQUES

La revue québécoise de sciences humaines, *RELIGIOLOGIQUES*, qui
s’intéresse aux manifestations du sacré dans la culture ainsi qu’au
phénomène religieux sous toutes ses formes, a le plaisir de vous annoncer
la publication du numéro 33 (printemps 2016) intitulé, « Mutations :
croyances et pratiques religieuses migrantes ». Les textes son disponibles
(dans leur intégralité) sur le site Internet de la revue.

Roxanne D. Marcotte, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
Pour le comité de rédaction de * RELIGIOLOGIQUES*

*RELIGIOLOGIQUES, no 33, **printemps 2016 *
Mutations : croyances et pratiques religieuses migrantes
Sous la direction scientifique de Roxanne D. MARCOTTE
http://www.religiologiques.uqam.ca/

SOMMAIRE
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
– – – – – – – – – – – – –
PRÉSENTATION

Roxanne D. MARCOTTE
Perspectives sur les nouvelles modalités des croyances et pratiques
religieuses migrantes

ARTICLES

Christophe MONNOT
Institutionnalisation des pratiques collectives bouddhistes et hindoues en
Suisse

Hicham BENAISSA
Le « prêt à intérêt » ou la pratique économique symbolique  d’une économie
des pratiques

Béatrice HALSOUET
Des réfugiés népalo-bhoutanais au Québec : comment être hindou dans une
ville moyenne, en région ?

Elisabeth MAREELS
Des portes de la ville à la conquête des nations : spiritualisation du
local et du global chez les pentecôtistes brésiliens de Bruxelles

Francesco PIRAINO
L’héritage de René Guénon dans le soufisme du XXIe siècle en France et en
Italie

Felicia DUMAS
Retransmission numérique de la Divine Liturgie et le confort du croire

Five recent books on religion from Springer

Springer has recently published five books on various aspects of religion.  Click the links to see details.

    

(Editor’s note: Thanks to Springer for contributing to the ISA-RC22 Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars!)

Two new books on religion from Springer

Springer has just published the two new books on religion:

Pagan Ethics is ​he first comprehensive presentation of contemporary, classical, and indigenous pagan ethics.

The 2015 edition of the American Jewish Year Book continues a 100+ year tradition of leading academics publishing long review chapters on topics of interest to the American Jewish community.

You can get details at the Springer website: www.springer.com

 

      American Jewish Year Book

(Editor’s note: Thanks to Springer for contributing to the ISA-RC22 Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars!)

New book in the series “ Muslims in Global Societies” (Springer)

Springer has published a new book in the series “ Muslims in Global Societies”, edited by Bryan Turner

Visit the series website at https://www.springer.com/series/7863?detailsPage=titles

Muslims in Global Societies Series

(Editor’s note: Thanks to Springer for contributing to the ISA-RC22 Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars!)

A new book in the series “Popular Culture, Religion and Society. A Social-Scientific Approach” (Springer)

Springer has published a new book in the series “Popular Culture, Religion and Society. A Social-Scientific Approach”, edited by Adam Possamai

Visit the series website at http://www.springer.com/series/13357

Popular Culture, Religion and Society. A Social-Scientific Approach

(Editor’s note: Thanks to Springer for contributing to the ISA-RC22 Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars!)

Four New Books from the series “Boundaries of Religious Freedom: Regulating Religion in Diverse Societies” (Springer)

Springer has published four new books in the series “Boundaries of Religious Freedom: Regulating Religion in Diverse Societies”, edited by Lori G. Beaman, Anna Halafoff, and Lene Kühle

Visit the series website at http://www.springer.com/series/11839

Boundaries of Religious Freedom: Regulating Religion in Diverse Societies

(Editor’s note: Thanks to Springer for contributing to the ISA-RC22 Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars!)