SSSR “Fall Fridays” Virtual Program

Please join us for a series of virtual events this fall organized by SSSR President, Laura Olson. Attendance is free, but you must register for each event in order to participate. Recordings of each session will be available after the events.

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Friday, October 23
10:00 am Eastern Time (GMT – 4:00)
Religion and Spirituality in a Frightening World: A Conversation with Rabbi Hazzan Jeffrey Myers
Jeffrey S. Myers is the Rabbi of Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha Congregation in Pittsburgh. A teacher, scholar, and accomplished musician, he is ordained as both a rabbi and a cantor (hazzan) in the Conservative Jewish tradition. Ever since a gunman murdered 11 people during Shabbat morning services at his congregation, he has been an embodiment of how faith, love, and inclusion can defeat hate. SSSR President Laura Olson will speak with Rabbi Hazzan Myers about how religion helps individuals, groups, and societies confront terrifying circumstances.
Register for this event:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_TO2BfBIrSWGraiuaoA5DZg
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event via Zoom.

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Friday, October 30
2:30 pm Eastern Time (GMT – 4:00)
Religion, Race, and the Struggle for Justice: A Conversation with Rev. Dr. Nichole R. Phillips
A Joint Presentation of the SSSR and the Religious Research Association
Nichole R. Phillips is Associate Professor in the Practice of Sociology of Religion and Culture, and Director of Black Church Studies, at Candler School of Theology at Emory University. Her scholarship treats religion, critical race, gender, and cultural memory studies. She is the author of Patriotism Black and White: The Color of American Exceptionalism (Baylor University Press 2018). RRA President Patricia Wittberg and SSSR President Laura Olson will speak with Dr. Phillips about how religion might help the United States confront and repair its long history of racial injustice.
Register for this event:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vQvny2-kRrqDcPJfeDdIWQ
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event via Zoom.

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Friday, November 6
2:30 pm Eastern Time (GMT – 5:00)
Religion and the 2020 U.S Presidential Election: A Panel Discussion
On the first Friday after the 2020 U.S. presidential election, SSSR President Laura Olson will convene a panel of three expert analysts to discuss the ways in which religion affected the election’s outcome and how it might shape the political road ahead. Panelists include Michele Margolis, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania; Gerardo Martí, L. Richardson King Professor of Sociology at Davidson College; and Besheer Mohamed, Senior Researcher at the Pew Research Center.
Register for this event:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN__GRZg_8BTA6S2A7EtSrEOA
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event via Zoom.

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Friday, November 13
2:30 pm Eastern Time (GMT – 5:00)
SSSR Annual Business Meeting and Awards Presentation
All SSSR members are invited to join us for our annual business meeting and awards presentations. The Distinguished Book Award will be presented by Michael Emerson of the University of Illinois at Chicago; the Distinguished Article Award will be presented by Amy Slagle of the University of Southern Mississippi; and the Student Paper Award will be presented by Christopher Scheitle of West Virginia University.
Register in for this event:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_XIm-k_v4SeOEPB4G4-fUEg
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event via Zoom.

Public Lecture: Les femmes issues des sociétés musulmanes : des voix plurielles

Bonjour à vous,

Le Centre de recherche Société, Droit et Religions de l’Université de Sherbrooke (SoDRUS) vous invite à une conférence publique qui aura lieu le mercredi 28 octobre 2020. 

Les femmes issues des sociétés musulmanes : des voix plurielles
Date : 28 octobre 2020
Heure : 11h55
Lieu : Événement tenu en ligne, sur TEAMS

Inscription obligatoire à l’adresse suivante : sodrus@usherbrooke.ca

Cette conférence sera donnée par Osire Glacier, professeure à l’Université Bishop et chercheure au SoDRUS.

Merci de diffuser l’information dans vos réseaux.

Au plaisir de vous accueillir,

Raphaël Mathieu Legault-Laberge, Ph.D.
Coordonnateur et chercheur partenaire
Centre de recherche Société, Droit et Religions
Université de Sherbrooke

CFP: Journal of Religion & Demography

CALL FOR PAPERS (2020)

There is still time to submit! In Volume 7, Issue 1 (May 2020), the Journal of Religion and Demography published papers on:

Are you sitting on a treasure trove of quantitative analysis of religion? We want to hear about it! Submissions are open for the next issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Religion and Demography.

For more information, please email gzurlo@bu.edu. Papers are submitted via Brill’s Editorial Manager.

Submit a Paper Here

New Book: “Kinship, Law and Politics: An Anatomy of Belonging”

Kinship, Law and Politics

By Joseph E. David

Book description

Why are we so concerned with belonging? In what ways does our belonging constitute our identity? Is belonging a universal concept or a culturally dependent value? How does belonging situate and motivate us? Joseph E. David grapples with these questions through a genealogical analysis of ideas and concepts of belonging. His book transports readers to crucial historical moments in which perceptions of belonging have been formed, transformed, or dismantled. The cases presented here focus on the pivotal role played by belonging in kinship, law, and political order, stretching across cultural and religious contexts from eleventh-century Mediterranean religious legal debates to twentieth-century statist liberalism in Western societies. With his thorough inquiry into diverse discourses of belonging, David pushes past the politics of belonging and forces us to acknowledge just how wide-ranging and fluid notions of belonging can be.

Reviews

‘Not since Charles Taylor have scholars seen such a profound inquiry into the sources of selfhood and the nature of belonging in community. Joseph David draws on a stunning range of ancient and modern, familiar and forgotten figures to probe the depths of human nature and our essential bonds of marriage and family, friendship and faith, property and state. This is interdisciplinary and interreligious scholarship of the highest caliber.’
—– John Witte, Jr. – Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion, Emory University

‘Joseph David’s book is an immensely erudite and deep exploration of the meaning of belonging and identity. David’s brilliant examination of the belonging and identity in their different layers and in diverse historical settings, is of fundamental importance to the understanding of the complexity of the concept and the vital role it plays in contemporary political and cultural life.’
—- Moshe Halbertal – New York University

Workshop: “Research Slam”

DEADLINE APPROACHING! The International Association for the study of Religion and Gender (IARG), the Centre for Gender and Diversity of Maastricht University, and the Centre for Research on Culture and Gender of Ghent University invite PhD students to participate in the workshop

“Research Slam”

In association with the symposium “Gender and Diversity in Contemporary Yoga”

Friday, 23 October 2020, 15.00-17.00 (GMT +1)



The global COVID-19 pandemic poses great challenges and new responsibilities for academic institutions and researchers. Worldwide, universities have stopped their activities and ongoing research has been put on hold. The pandemic is affecting many of us in the academic community, especially graduate students: from transitioning to online teaching and learning, canceling research trips and fieldwork to delays in research funding applications, many of us are worried about the effects of the shutdown on our research, and our future in academia, bearing in mind the potential gendered implications of the pandemic. Practicing self-care in such uncertain times has become extremely important. But how do we do it? Social distancing and stay-at-home orders should not prevent us from taking care of ourselves and each other. This workshop is a platform to meet, share and reflect on our experiences with the aim to foster a collective and supportive community for members of the IARG. We invite you to join our two-hour online workshop.
Prof. Ulrike Auga (President of IARG), Prof. Chia Longman (Ghent University), Prof. Lies Wesseling (Maastricht University) and Prof. Maria del Mar Griera (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona) will share their own thoughts and experiences during this crisis and reflect on different ways that (self) care can bring us together. After a short break we invite you to share with us and other members of the IARG your reflections on how the crisis affects your life and study, in a 2-minute slot. Knowing you’re not alone and that others are sharing similar struggles will help us connect and develop self-compassion.
For registration, please send an email with your name and university affiliation to:
lana.sirri@maastrichtuniversity.nl by 10 October 2020. 
There are two forms of registration:
Option 1 – attendance as a listening participant
Option 2 – contribution to the discussion by giving a 2-minute talk on your own reflections and challenges as an academic.
Please mention your chosen option in your registration email so that we can facilitate a smoother moderation and dialogue among all participants online.

Book Announcement: “Regulating Religious Diversity and Nationhood in the Secular West

Regulating Difference

Regulating Difference: Religious Diversity and Nationhood in the Secular West, by Marian Burchardt (Rutgers University Press, 2020)

About This Book

Transnational migration has contributed to the rise of religious diversity and has led to profound changes in the religious make-up of society across the Western world. As a result, societies and nation-states have faced the challenge of crafting ways to bring new religious communities into existing institutions and the legal frameworks. Regulating Difference explores how the state regulates religious diversity and examines the processes whereby religious diversity and expression becomes part of administrative landscapes of nation-states and people’s everyday lives. Arguing that concepts of nationhood are key to understanding the governance of religious diversity, Regulating Difference employs a transatlantic comparison of the Spanish region of Catalonia and the Canadian province of Quebec to show how processes of nation-building, religious heritage-making and the mobilization of divergent interpretations of secularism are co-implicated in shaping religious diversity. It argues that religious diversity has become central for governing national and urban spaces.

About the Author

Marian Burchardt is a professor of sociology at the University of Leipzig. Author of Faith in the Time of AIDS: Religion, Biopolitics and Modernity in South Africa, he is a senior research partner of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity and associate member of the Humanities Center of Advanced Studies “Multiple Secularities”.

Call for Papers: Review of Religious Research

Review of Religious Research (RRR) publishes empirical social-science research on religion, primarily in sociology and social psychology, and scholarly literature reviews of religious research in these fields.

In keeping with its mission, the Religious Research Association (RRA), which sponsors RRR, encourages research that has practical implications for denominations and religious bodies.

RRR provides a forum for applied and academic research across multiple disciplines and approaches, including research on the following topical areas: Clergy; Church programs; Comparative analyses of religious denominations and institutions; Denominational and congregational growth, decline, and vitality; Denominational and congregational conflict, competition, and cooperation; Ethnicity/race and religion; Generational and personal religious change; New religious movements; Personal spiritual and religious beliefs and practices; Religion and attitudes; Religion and family; Religion and gender, Religion and social behavior; Religion and well-being; and Research methodology.

Four types of articles are included in this Call for Papers:

  • Original Research Articles
  • Research Notes
  • Review Articles, and
  • Applied Research Abstracts.

Original Research Article: This type of article must be a scholarly and methodologically sophisticated empirical study that provides a comprehensive literature review of the relevant topics related to the research question, and it should have a strong theoretical foundation. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 10,000 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Research Note: This type of article must also be a scholarly and methodologically sophisticated empirical study, but its research question does not have to be theory based, and its literature review should be shorter and more focused. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 7,500 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Review Article: Authors should send an email directly to the RRR Editor-in-Chief (kjflannelly@gmail.com) describing the nature and scope of a proposed literature review to see if it is suitable for publication in RRR before they submit it. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. The manuscript should also contain a methodology section that explains how the literature search was conducted and how articles were selected for inclusion in the review. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 10,000 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Applied Research Abstract: This type of article consists of a 350-550 word summary (without any references) of an applied research study in the form of a structured abstract with the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, followed by 3-4 keywords. The author(s) may include a footnote that states: (a) whether a complete report exists and how it can be obtained; (b) whether the raw data are available in electronic form and how they can be obtained if the authors wish to make them available to other researchers; and/or (c) whether the authors would like to collaborate with other researchers to further analyze the data and write a full report for possible journal publication as a peer-reviewed manuscript.

GUIDELINES

  • Statistical Methodology – Original Research Articles/Research Notes: Quantitative studies should use the most appropriate statistical procedures needed to answer the research question, which include adequate statistical controls (e.g., using demographic variables as covariates that are known to be associated with the religious variables in the study).
  • Sampling Methodology – Original Research Articles/Research Notes: Both quantitative and qualitative studies should meet sociological standards of representativeness (RRR does not publish studies based solely on convenience sampling). Therefore, qualitative studies published in RRR must employ more systematic and representative approaches to sampling than most qualitative studies do. Convenience sampling can only be employed during the last step in the sampling process, usually after (a) drawing random samples from national or regional surveys, or datasets maintained by religious or other kinds of organizations, or (b) sampling congregations from different cities, states, or regions, or (c) selecting church programs, denominations, congregations, or other social groups that meet specified inclusion criteria.

Editorial Decision-making Process

All four types of manuscripts are initially read by the Editor-in-Chief to determine if they are generally appropriate for publication in RRR based on the guidelines described in this Call for Papers. All manuscripts that are deemed to be appropriate, except Applied Research Abstracts, then undergo blind peer-review by two or more qualified researchers. The Editor-in-Chief is solely responsible for publication decisions about Applied Research Abstracts. Editorial decisions are based on whether a manuscript: (a) poses a clear and valid research question; (b) makes a meaningful contribution to the field; (c) provides appropriate evidence or reasoning for its conclusions; (d) is written in an intelligible fashion in standard English; and (e) conforms to the guidelines described herein.

Your manuscript should be submitted at https://www.editorialmanager.com/rorr/default.aspx

After you login and select “New Manuscript Submission,” you need to select the appropriate type of article and follow the rest of the directions.

Manuscript Submission and Processing Fee: Authors who are not RRA members are required to pay a $35 manuscript processing fee before their manuscript undergoes peer-review. This fee can be paid by joining the RRA, whose annual membership is $35.

  • Authors must submit a cover letter with their submission that covers: (a) RRA membership and this fee; (b) the topical areas with which the manuscript fits; (c) and some other items about the manuscript.
  • Please see the “Cover Letter” and “Fee” sections of the RRR “Instructions for Authors” for more details (https://www.springer.com/journal/13644/submission-guidelines#Instructions%20for%20authors ), including examples of cover letters.

Call for Articles for a Thematic Issue of Religion

Working titles (comments/suggestions welcome):

Emic Categories and New Paths / Case Studies in the Scholarly Use of Indigenous Concepts

Religion invites contributions for a thematic issue consisting of case studies of concepts from non-prominent cultures (not just religions) that have been or could be useful in the study of religion/s. Is there a blindspot, lacuna or distortion in the study of religion/s that can be highlighted or addressed by a term from a tradition that you study? Does a particular concept from your materials/data/fieldwork move past our existing vocabulary or contribute to current debates? Is our discipline missing key terms for specific areas of research – material culture, views of selfhood, non-binary categories, dynamic and non-essentialist views of pluralisms etc. – and where might these be found? On the negative side, have classic appropriations of certain insider concepts created more problems than they are worth (god, guru, hell, liturgy, mana, shaman)? Within the academy, are there terms used in non-English language scholarship, beyond the North-Atlantic axis (or even within, e.g., evangelical Christianity and other well-studied traditions), that can contribute to our discipline (e.g., emerging emic concepts, indigenous methods or southern theory)? Each article will discuss a single concept (or two or three closely related terms), spelling out the significance of the term in its home context, contribution to the study of religions, and a critical assessment of existing uses (if any) in the relevant scholarly literatures. Final length: 5000–10000 words, all-inclusive.

Please send a brief proposal or outline (500–1200 words) by February 1, 2021. Proposed submission deadline: Sept 1, 2021. Web copy of this call: https://stevenengler.ca/cfp/ Questions and comments: sengler@mtroyal.ca