INFORM Seminar: “How Minority Religions React to the Law”

Registration is now open for the next Inform Seminar, How Minority Religions React to the Law, in conjunction with the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College, London.

Saturday 1st June, 10am-5pm (registration at 9.30). Bush House Lecture Theatre 1, King’s College, London, 30 Aldwych, London, WC2B 4BG.

Please visit https://inform.ac/seminars to book tickets via Paypal or credit/debit card.

Registration costs:

  • Standard: £38
  • Unwaged/ university student: £18
  • A Level student: £10

After 12th May, ticket prices will increase by £10, across all three categories and refunds will not be offered.

Speakers include:

  • Professor Eileen Barker, FAcSS, FBA, OBE, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Founder and Honorary Acting Director of Inform.
  • Dr Effie Fokas, Senior Research Fellow at the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP), host institution to the Grassrootsmobilise project, which studies grassroots level mobilisations ‘in the shadow’ of European Court of Human Rights religious freedoms jurisprudence.
  • Professor Susan Palmer, Director of a four-year (SSHRC Insight) research project, ‘Children in Sectarian Religions and State Control’ at McGill University’s School of Religious Studies, who will present a paper on The Trials of the Old Order Mennonites of Manitoba, 2013-2106.
  • Ringo Ringvee, a government official from Estonia who will speak about minority religions’ reactions to recent laws in Estonia.
  • Eric Roux, President of the Union of Churches of Scientology of France and Vice President of the European Office of the Church of Scientology for Public Affairs and Human Rights.
  • Dr Rin Ushiyama, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge, an expert on Aum Shinrikyo, and its offshoots Aleph and Hikari No Wa.
  • Peter Zoehrer, Secretary General of FOREF Europe (Forum for Religious Freedom), Austria, and a member of the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification.

Call for Contributions on Religion for the Encyclopaedia for African Studies

Colleagues,

I have been assigned to be the subject editor of African Religions section of The Encyclopaedia for African Studies. This is a proposed resource centre for people interested in the study of Africa. As we all know, African religion(s) is a significant part of this. We hope that this will serve African scholars, advanced researchers, professors, and specialists and especially undergraduate and graduate students taking courses or doing research on Africa. The entries should include articles and multimedia resources on different aspects of the African continent, and should also provide direction to other related content within the encyclopaedia. When we speak about African religions, we cover content about African indigenous religions, and Africanized religions including African Christianity and African Islam, and African religions in the Diaspora. This is an opportunity for us to contribute to this important volume. Entries vary from 1,500 to 8,000 words depending on significance/relevance and topic of discussion.

Entries should be meticulously and academic, thus it is important that guidelines related to copyright infringements are followed as well as intellectual property rights. As an editor on the subject area of religion, my job is to suggest a list of themes for the discipline, once approved the writing process will commence. We hope that the proposed Routledge Online Encyclopaedia will be one of the top reference resource for students, professors and professionals interested in African studies.

I have suggestions for entries, or you may propose your own.  If interested, let me know as soon as possible. All entries should be submitted latest by July 15, 2019. Contact me at wangilam@ecu.edu  if you have any further questions on this.

Thank you,
Mary Nyangweso

wangilam@ecu.edu

Apply for Generations in Dialogue about the Sociology of Religion

The Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies at the University of Southern California (USC) is seeking applications for its Generations in Dialogue (GID) program about the Sociology of Religion.

The GID program involves a widely-recognized senior Catholic scholar sharing his or her time, expertise, and wisdom with several junior scholars in the same or related disciplines. Over a two-year period these scholars convene for four weekend dialogues that include discipline-specific discussions, personal reflection, shared prayer, and presentations from distinguished scholars and public intellectuals.  Besides benefitting from two years of mentorship, junior scholars will establish relationships with other dedicated scholars in their field.

A generous stipend is included. Early-career (pre-tenure and dissertation stage) social scientists are eligible. Applications are welcome from anyone interested in a substantive and critical engagement with Catholicism’s multiple intellectual traditions

For more information and an application:

https://ifacs.com/programs/generations-in-dialogue/

Call for Papers:r the 1st European Conference for Religious Dialogue and Cooperation

Conference Theme: “THE ROLE OF RELIGION IN PEACE AND CONFLICT”

October 14-17, 2019
Struga, Republic of North Macedonia

One of the key questions that contemporary sociology is faced is what exactly is the role of different religions when conflicts emerged between civilizations, ethnic groups and states? How do religious individuals and groups use their power in a development tending toward either peace or conflict? Sociological, philosophical, anthropological, historical, psychological and theological approaches are welcome in this Conference to contribute in an attempt to answer these questions.

The First European Conference on Religious Dialogue and Cooperation will provide scientific analysis of this global challenge.  It will pay particular attention to their interconnections and to possible solutions.

We encourage authors to submit paper proposals based on the results of their scientific studies, as well as the methodological and theoretical aspects of the study of religion in Europe. The official language of the conference is English. All papers that successfully pass the reviewing process will be published in a journal with an international editorial board.

Please submit a 200-300 words abstract of your presentation by e-mail to: Ivana Dragovic, M.Sc., President of the Conference Organizing Committee email : ivana@fzf.ukim.edu.mk by June 15, 2019.

Key dates:

  • Submission of paper proposals: June 15, 2019.
  • Notification of acceptance and opening of the registration: July 1, 2019.
  • The final date of the registration for the conference: September 15, 2019.
  • Final program: October 1, 2019.
  • Submission of full papers: March 1, 2020

Registration Fee: 150 Eur The costs of travel and accommodation have to be covered by the conference participants. We offer organized transport from the Skopje Airport to Hotel Drim in Struga.

For participants of the conference, Hotel Drim (www.drim.com.mk) offers reduced prices for accommodation with included meals.

All necessary information can be obtained from the official website of the Conference http://icrd.mk/ 

We are looking forward to receiving your papers!

PROFESSOR ZORAN MATEVSKI, Ph.D. Director of the Center for Intercultural Studies and Research At the Faculty of Philosophy in Skopje

AASR 2019 CONFERENCE Conference Theme: Religion and Violence

AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF RELIGION

The 2019 AASR conference will be held from December 5-6 at the city campus of the University of Newcastle, co-hosted by the AASR, the Centre for the Study of Violence and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

Conference Theme: Religion and Violence

We invite scholarly reflections on the complex and diverse relations between religion and violence, incorporating counter discourses of peace and social justice.

The relationship between religion and violence continues to be contentious and marked by significant changes in global and domestic politics including humanitarian crises, displaced peoples particularly asylum seekers, the rise and fall of extremist religious movements, the status of hate speech, the role of social media and the ongoing threat of religious terrorism. 

These major upheavals, particularly the claims to religious authority and legitimacy through violent means, have led to a growth in collective anxiety threatening global and local security.  Religious violence can be direct and institutional; aimed against individuals or groups; administered by the state or by non-state actors; material and symbolic.

A counterpoint is provided by religiously-motivated peace and social justice movements, including those for welcoming religiously-diverse refugees and migrants, interfaith initiatives and movements for gender and sexuality equality and animal rights. For example, values of religious diversity, social solidarity and pluralism have been notable in responding to recent expressions of violence including the events in Christchurch in March 2019 and provide notable moments of hope in moving towards religious diversity as a global value.

The conference invites papers engaging these issues from relevant disciplines including religious studies, politics, history, philosophy, law, theology, sociology and anthropology, social work, criminology, gender and women’s studies and education. Of particular interest are contributions examining:

  • ·         the relationship between religious identity and violent extremism
  • ·         state management of religious violence including the regulation of social media and hate speech
  • ·         state perpetration of religious violence
  • ·         perceptions and constructions of religious violence
  • ·         theoretical approaches to the meaning of religious violence including examples of scapegoating and symbolic forms of violence
  • ·         the relationship between gender, sexuality, religion and violence with particular attention to current issues of clergy abuse and domestic violence
  • ·         representations of religious violence in popular culture
  • ·         race, ethnicity, otherness and religious violence
  • ·         religion and animal rights
  • ·         religious movements for peace and social cohesion

How to Submit

Send proposals to the conference convenor Kathleen McPhillips: Kathleen.mcphillips@newcastle.edu.au

Please include Title, Author, Abstract (maximum 150 words) and university affiliation by 1st August 2019.

We are particularly interested in panel proposals on the conference theme, which must include no more than 4 panel members with a theme, paper titles, abstracts and authors.

Confirmations of acceptance will be sent by 1st September 2019. Late papers will not be considered.

Membership

Please note: submissions will only be considered if authors are members of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion.

For membership please visit the AASR website https://www.aasr.org.au/join-us. Members of NZASR do not need to also have AASR membership.

Conference Venue

The University of Newcastle is Australia’s leading regional university and has a record of global excellence in enquiry and engagement. The School of Humanities and Social Sciences supports the interdisciplinary study of religion including via the Centre for the History of Violence, where researchers work on projects across a breadth of themes including religion. The University’s city campus– Newspace – is located in the centre of the business district close to transport, accommodation, the harbour, beaches and the entertainment area. See https://www.newcastle.edu.au/about-uon/our-environments/new-space

Newcastle is located 2 hours north of Sydney and is easily accessible by road, air and train.  Transport to and from Newcastle airport provides easy access into the city and hosts international flights, including direct flights from Auckland and most major Australian cities.

SocRel Stream Plenary at BSA Conference

The Sociology of Religion study group will be hosting its own stream plenary at the BSA Annual Conference, Challenging Social Hierarchies and Inequalities, Glasgow Caledonian University 24–26 April 2019.

The plenary is titled ‘Religion and The Good’ with keynote speakers, Prof Chris Baker (Goldsmiths), Prof Gordon Lynch (University of Kent) and Dr Marta Trzebiatowska (University of Aberdeen). The session is intended to explore the idea of the good and morality in shaping social life and how religion connects to such meaning making, while also exploring what does ‘the good’ mean in different spaces and spheres. It will consider how religion responds to notions of ‘the common good’ and the different forms morality and ethical meaning making might take within religions and beyond. The stream plenary is scheduled for 9:30-10:30 Thursday 25th April.

To register for the conference please visit: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/key-bsa-events/bsa-annual-conference-2019-challenging-social-hierarchies-and-inequalities/

Jameel Scholarships

The Islam-UK Centre at Cardiff University is pleased to invite applications for this year’s Jameel Scholarships, starting September 2019.

Three fully-funded scholarships are available for the MA course ‘Islam in Contemporary Britain’.  Each scholarship will cover full UK/EU tuition fees and provide students with a £15,000 stipend as well as a £1,000 research
allowance.  For more information, refer to http://sites.cardiff.ac.uk/islamukcentre/jameel-scholarships/

*Closing date for scholarship applications: 24th May 2019.*

Please circulate among your networks and encourage interested final year undergraduate students to apply!

For all enquiries, please contact: jameelscholarships@cardiff.ac.uk

Call for Papers: “Mosques, families and Islamic Law”

‘Danish Mosques – Significance, Use and Influence’ together with the ‘Nordic Mosques Research network’ invites papers and applications for participation. This will be the first workshop as part of the HS-NOS funding and the mid-term conference in the Danish Mosques research project.

The workshop will take place at in Göteborg in Sweden at the Hotel Panorama from 21st to 23rd August 2019.

The deadline for the call for papers is May 1st, 2019.

All contact should be addressed to Niels Valdemar Vinding, lbm993@hum.ku.dk

https://mosques.ku.dk/activities/mosques-families-and-islamic-law/

Call for Papers

For this workshop, we invite scholars and researchers in the Nordic countries (and beyond) that work in the intersection of mosques, family and Islamic law. Mosques are widely understood as Muslim institutions in the discursivity of Islam. Similarly, Islamic law is widely defined as Islamic ethics, norms and practice. In our view and in legal terms, the biggest challenge for mosques and Muslims in the Nordic countries is building authentic and responsive legal institutions that may help Muslims in their ethnic, social and legal dilemmas and problems, where Western society seems to disappoint. There is a significant degree of experimentation and different attempts at articulating a religious legal identity and institutions amongst Muslims in the Nordic countries. This has been going on for a number of years, but now seems to be quasi-institutionalised to point where we are able to find legal documents, interview people and observe the process of legal institutionalization.

However, currently Muslim legal institutions are reaching out to governments and courts to better regulate and establish their practices to mitigate the significant risk of having their work deemed illegitimate and even illegal. The most significant legal concern by far is Muslim family law with the fear of parallel legal orders and subversive counter-normativity.

The operable questions for the workshop are; how are Muslims in mosques (and beyond) articulating their legal, ethical and normative identities? What kind of institutions are being build? How many so-called Islamic councils are there in the Nordic countries? How are they seen and used by Muslims? What kind of Islamic law and ethics issues are seen by the courts and quasi-courts in the Nordic countries, such as family matters, divorce, mediation, inherence, honour, polygamy? How do the courts and the legal systems in general approach and address these issues?

We are inviting submissions for papers as well as for participation in the workshop. We will give preference to papers to be presented during the workshop. For paper presentations, we are expecting written contributions to either an upcoming special issue of a leading journal or to a concluding anthology on Nordic Mosques in Context.

Paper abstracts of 300 words or expressions of interest in participation and a short CV to be submitted to Niels Valdemar Vinding, lbm993@hum.ku.dk, on May 1st 2019 at the latest.

Workshop Series Theme

This is the first in a series of three workshops on Nordic Mosques in Context – On the institutional embeddedness of Islam in the Nordic countries sponsored by a NOS-HS Workshop Grant. The second is on ”Mosques, power and politics,” in Copenhagen, Denmark, in January 2020, and the third is on ”Mosques, communities and finance,” in Oslo, Norway, August 2020. The purpose of the workshops is to investigate the dimensions of institutional embeddedness of Islam in the Nordic countries as mosques seek to be responsive institutions for the needs of Muslims, challenged by economic, legal and political alternatives. We are considering mosques as the focal point of Islam in economic, legal and political terms, the primary objective of this research project is to study the institutional strategies of mosques and Muslims in embedding Islam in the Nordic wider societies. The key here is to see to what extend mosques are responsive institutions for the needs of Muslim in soliciting the wider public, or if Muslims go beyond the mosque in the pursuit of other more apt forms of institutionalised religious life such as invoking Islamic economic, legal and political responses. We argue that the entire future of mosques depends on whether they can give and refine responsive and meaningful answers and make them coherent with the economic, legal and politics questions that Muslims seek the answers to. As such, this may result in the secularisation of mosques as they negotiate and find their place in society. Will these new or re-interpreted institutional expressions clash with the general public, will they fail Muslims or will they be viable alternatives for embedding Islam in the Nordic countries?

Workshop structure

We are aiming to conduct this workshop from the afternoon on Wednesday 21st August and finish with lunch on Friday 23rd August. All accepted participants will have flights, trains and other public transportation and hotel costs covered. We are organising a programme with keynotes, paper sessions with 20 minutes presentation and 10 minutes Q&A, as well as an afternoon open to the public and local stakeholders.

Conveners

Brian Arly Jacobsen, assoc. professor, Sociology of Religion, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Torkel Brekke, Research Professor, Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Norway

Göran Larsson, Professor in Religious Studies, Göteborg University, Sweden

Niels Valdemar Vinding, post.doc., Islamic Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Call for Applications: Editor of Sociology of Religion

Submission Deadline: April 30, 2019

Send applications to:

Rachel Kraus, ASREO@bsu.edu

Please visit our website for complete information

The Association for the Sociology of Religion (ASR) invites applications for the position Editor of ASR’s journal, Sociology of Religion. The journal has a distinguished record of publishing exceptional sociological research on all facets of religion and spirituality, along with robust two-year (1.556) and five-year (2.000) impact factors.

The journal is published by Oxford University Press on a quarterly basis and is highly competitive, with a 16% acceptance rate from among the nearly 200 manuscripts that are typically submitted in a given year and a 12-week average decision time frame on submitted manuscripts. Published articles commonly feature research on the contours and antecedents of religious involvement, the consequences of religiosity for other domains of social life (gender, health, etc.), the linkages between religion and other social institutions, trends related to religious participation and disaffiliation, various expressions of faith and spirituality, and diverse methodological and theoretical approaches for examining such topics.

Sociology of Religion focuses principally on the publication of basic research that meets stringent scholarly standards. Theoretical and methodological sophistication are a hallmark of articles published in Sociology of Religion. Articles commonly discuss the implications of research findings for the ongoing investigation of religion, social policy, and religious practice. Thus, while applied research is not a principal focus of the journal, practical considerations associated with research findings are commonly addressed.

Research published in the journal is promoted through various venues, including social media (e.g., @SORJournal Twitter account), podcasts, and the annual meetings of the Association for the Sociology of Religion (held in August).

Interdisciplinary symposium *Pentecostal Charismatic Christianity and Migration*.

Date: 2-3 of August, 2019

Venue: Parramatta City Campus, Western Sydney University

169 Macquarie St, Parramatta, NSW, Australia

Abstracts due: 10 of April 2019 (title, 250-word abstract, short bio)

Submit to: Dr Kathleen Openshaw k.openshaw@westernsydney.edu.au

Keynote Speaker: Associate Prof Richard Vokes (University of Western Australia)

Symposium Conveners:

Prof Cristina Rocha, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU

Prof Mark Hutchinson, Alphacrucis College

Dr Kathleen Openshaw, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU

Mrs Ingrid Ryan, Alphacrucis College

Symposium Theme

Over the past few decades, Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity (PCC) has exploded in the Global South and grown considerably in the Global North. Much of this grow this fuelled by networks of megachurches, the mobility of community leaders across diasporic networks, migration and media. While traditionally missionaries would travel in a North-to- South direction, more recently megachurches from the Global South have moved horizontally, across to other developing countries, and also made inroads in to the Global North in efforts of reverse missionisation. Such attempts to missionise to locals in the Global North have been largely (though not wholly) unsuccessful and churches have turned their focus to migrants from the Global South. Many studies have shown that migrants, who were not attached to PCCs before migration, join churches in the diaspora as they offer them a home away from home. Meanwhile, diasporic churches also face difficulties keeping these (as well as second generation) migrants, since they may prefer local churches in an effort to integrate. In this symposium we probe these themes and are seeking papers on the following topics:

  • Historical developments
  • Missionary activities and migration
  • Translocal and transnational PCC networks
  • Translocal and transnational families and PCC
  • Young migrants and PCC
  • Second generation migrants and PCC
  • Gender, PCC and migration
  • City infrastructures and diasporic churches
  • Theological themes and migration
  • Cultural translation, negotiation, adaptation of migrant churches
  • PCC, media, music, information communication Technologies and migration
  • Material culture and migrants’ lived experiences in PCC churches
  • Aesthetics and embodied practices
  • Immobility, borders and PCC

Cristina

Professor Cristina Rocha

Director of Religion and Society Research Cluster

Western Sydney University

President: Australian Association for the Study of Religion