ISA Research Committee 22 2018-02-03 01:58:13

Dears,

I thought this may be of some interest to some of you:

This piece Why Am I Still Muslim? by Mohammed Hashas, is available open access at:   https://www.criticalmuslim.io/why-am-i-still-muslim/#.WnMbW_woJQI.twitter

In Critical Muslim magazine (UK, editor Ziauddin Sardar), CM 25:2 Values, January 2018
Content of CM 25:2:
Rowan Williams explores Islam, Christianity and pluralism; Mohammed Hashas explains why he is still a Muslim; Maurice Irfan Coles teaches compassion; Shaista Aziz is fed up with everyday bigotry; Tahir Abbas encounters Generation M; Khidr Collective’s ‘other voices’; and poems by Maya Abu Al-Hayyat.
Kind regards,
Mohammed HASHAS, PhD (محمد حصحاص)
Research Fellow
LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome

Call for Papers: Social Science History Association Religion Network

Social Science History Association 2018 Annual Conference

Phoenix, Arizona, November 8-11, 2018

Conference Theme: “Histories of Disadvantage: Meanings, Mechanisms, and Politics”

SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 16, 2018

The Religion Network of the Social Science History Association invites proposals for papers, panels, and book sessions for the 43rd annual meeting of the Social Science History Association in Phoenix, Arizona, November 8-11, 2018. We are also looking for volunteers to serve as panel chairs and discussants.

The SSHA is the leading interdisciplinary association for historical research in the US, providing a stimulating venue for explorations of how social processes unfold over time. The Religion Network serves as the home within the organization for scholars interested in religious history, religious mobilization, religious change, and religion’s effect on social and political processes. Our network is interdisciplinary and cross-national in scope, and embraces all scholarship that examines how religion intersects with other social processes in historical perspective.

We encourage the participation of graduate students and recent PhDs as well as more established scholars from a wide range of disciplines and departments. Graduate students are eligible to apply for financial support to attend the annual meeting. Further details about the association, the 2018 annual meeting, and the call for proposals are available on the SSHA website: www.ssha.org.

The deadline for paper and/or panel submissions is February 16, 2018.

We welcome and encourage papers and panel proposals on a wide array of issues related to the historical study of religion and society. While complete panel proposals (consisting of 4-5 individual papers, a chair, and a discussant) are preferred, we also seek out high-quality individual paper submissions. Panels and papers may address the topics below, or any other relevant and related topic examining religion in a historical context:

·      Religion across Boundaries

·      Religion and Populism

·      Religion and Gender

·      Religion and Contemporary Geopolitics

·      Religion and State Formation

·      Secularizations, Secularisms, Secularities

·      Religion and Law

·      Religion and the Arts

·      Religion and Social Movements

·      Religion and Science

·      Religion and Field Theory

Please use the SSHA’s web conference management system to submit your papers and panel proposals. Paper title, brief abstract, and contact information should be submitted at http://prd.sshaconference.org/. Please do not hesitate to contact the Religion Network representatives with any questions, comments, or for help with submissions.

Thank you, and we look forward to a stimulating set of panels at this year’s SSHA meeting.

Ateş Altınordu (atesaltinordu@sabanciuniv.edu)

Sam Nelson (samuel.nelson@mcgill.ca)

Sadia Saeed (ssaeed3@usfca.edu)

Philip Gorski (philip.gorski@yale.edu)

SSHA Religion Network Representatives

PhD Studentships for Islamic Civilisation or Muslims in Europe for a September 2018

Dear Colleagues,

The Alwaleed Centre for the Study of Islam in the Contemporary World at the University of Edinburgh is offering two fully-funded PhD Studentships in either Islamic Civilisation or Muslims in Europe for a September 2018 start.

Full details including the application procedure can be found here: https://tinyurl.com/alwaleedcentrephd

Please circulate to anyone who you feel maybe interested. Any informal enquiries can be directed to the Centre’s Director, Professor Jaakko Hameen-Anttila: j.hameen-anttila@ed.ac.uk.

With very best wishes,

The Alwaleed Centre team

–University of Edinburgh

16 George Square

Edinburgh

EH8 9LD

www.alwaleed.ed.ac.uk

@alwaleed_centre

Call For Papers: Religion and Poverty

CALL FOR PAPERS:
Religion and Poverty
Thematic Collection in Palgrave Communications
Editors: Dr Gottfried Schweiger and Dr Helmut P Gaisbauer (University of Salzburg); Prof Clemens Sedmak (University of Notre Dame).
Submissions welcome on a rolling basis throughout 2018!
Poverty and religion are interrelated in different ways. On the one hand, for various religious traditions poverty is both an aspect of a particular faithful life (e.g. monastic communities) and giving to the poor is seen as a religious duty. Such traditions have evolved over time and expanded the role of faith-based organisations nowadays play in welfare provision and international development. Faith-based organizations play an important role in poverty alleviation both in rich and poor countries. These actions and practices, as well as their religious and theological underpinnings, deserve scrutiny. On the other hand, religion plays an important role in the life of people living in poverty: how they experience and shape their living, and how they find their place in society and the communities in which they. The role of religion in justifying certain inequalities and processes of exclusion (e.g. in India) and thus contributing to the sustainability of poverty is another important theme worth reflection.
We invite papers, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, that consider the following overarching question: how can religion be used as a vehicle to overcome structures of poverty, and how does it sometimes hinder such processes?
Contributions from sociology, development studies, religious studies, economics, theology, and other social sciences and humanities are welcomed; as are insights from different geographical settings, forms of poverty, and religious traditions.
This is a rolling article collection and as such submissions/proposals will be welcome throughout 2018.
This special issue is run in collaboration with the 2017 Salzburg Conference on Interdisciplinary Poverty Research, organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research of the University of Salzburg: www.poverty-conference.org

Lecture/Event: “Is God Really Dead? Why Belief Matters”, Professor Eileen Barker

Monday 12 February 2018, 6.30-8pm
London School of Economics, Old Theatre, Old Building
Hosted by the Department of Sociology

  • Speaker: Professor Eileen Barker, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at LSE with Special Reference to the Study of Religion.
  • Respondent: Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law at LSE
  • Chair: Professor Nigel Dodd, Professor of Sociology, LSE

Thirty years after founding INFORM, the information network on religious movements, Eileen Barker argues that the sociology of religion still has an important role in “knowing the causes of things”.

This event will celebrate Eileen’s work over the past 30 years. A celebratory drinks reception
will follow the lecture.

This event is free and open to all.
Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

More information at: http://www.lse.ac.uk/Events/2018/02/20180212t1830vOT/is-god-really-dead

Poster for “Is God Really Dead?”, with Prof. Eileen Barker

Call for Papers: 2018 International Conference on Religion & Film

Papers for the 2018 International Conference on Religion & Film may be on any topic related to religion and film. Papers may explore the religious meaning or significance of individual films, provide a historical perspective on religion and film, examine methodologies for religion and film studies, or analyze film genres in relation to religion. We encourage a discussion of films from around the world.

Proposals should include a title and a 350-word description of the paper, and also indicate whether visual media will be used and in what way(s). Papers will be accepted for inclusion in the program based on the description provided. On a separate page, proposals should identify the author and the author’s home institution. The official language of the Conference is English

https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/jrf/cfp2018.pdf

Call for Papers: Sociology of Religion Unit

Call for Papers
Sociology of Religion Unit,
American Academy of Religion
Denver, Colorado, November 17-20, 2018
https://papers.aarweb.org/content/sociology-religion-unit

Statement of Purpose:

The Sociology of Religion Program Unit of the American Academy of Religion serves as a bridge between religious studies and the subdiscipline of sociology of religion. The group operates as a two-way conduit to bring sociological research into the field of religious studies and to make findings in the broader study of religion available to sociologists. Through cross-fertilization transgressing disciplinary boundaries there can be breakthroughs in research in both fields. The group has a wide conception of sociology of religion. It is open to a multiplicity of approaches utilized in the discipline of sociology. We work to cultivate theoretical contributions founded upon empirical data from a variety of established methodologies such as quantitative, qualitative, and comparative-historical approaches. By liaising with other Program Units, the Sociology of Religion Group is able to bring the rich diversity of critical and analytical perspectives that are housed in the American Academy of Religion into mainstream sociology of religion. Concurrently, it aims to provide scholars of the study of religion with a deeper understanding of the landscape of sociology of religion.

Call for Papers:

Sociology of Religion as part of a larger discipline is marked by a canonization of its theory and its division by paradigms and methodologies–whether these be the classics (Weber and Durkheim), the old paradigm (functionalism and social constructionism), or the new paradigm (rational choice) on the one hand and quantitative, qualitative, or historical-comparative sociology on the other. As it intersects with sociology of religion, the study of religion has drawn from theories and methodologies in conversation with anthropology, critical theory, psychology, history, and other related disciplines. We are interested in papers that utilize the methods and theories in the study of religion and bring them into the sociological canon as well as those that help religious studies gain a better grasp of the sociological theory of religion. We encourage papers that draw from both the theory and methodology of sociology of religion and religious studies and use them as frames for analysis of concrete cases. We invite papers covering both historical and contemporary topics pertinent to the sociological study of religions. In particular, we request papers that touch upon social divisions examining race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, region, age, etc.

Critics of sociology of religion have pointed out that the field is dominated by North American scholars primarily interested in Protestantism. The discipline of religious studies provides a clear antidote to these perceived limitations. Therefore, we encourage contributions from academics who study the various religious traditions around the world as well as those studying North American religious communities. In particular, we would like submissions from scholars from all academic ranks across the lines of nationality, region, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, etc.

The purpose of the Sociology of Religion program unit of the American Academy of Religion is to bridge the gap and generate cross-fertilization between the Sociology of Religion and Religious Studies. We are open to papers in all areas and therefore encourage submissions of any topic relevant to the sociology of religion. This year, we are particularly interested in the following topics:

1) Measuring Religiosity and Secularity
2) Religion in the Public Sphere (theme of the conference)
3) Appropriation and Limitations of Western Sociological Theory
4) Politics and Religious Demographics (Demography of Religion) (i.e., voting)
5) Regionalism: Issues relevant to Colorado (water rights, religion and ecology, indigenous religions, etc.)
6) Networks approach (metatheoretical analysis)
7) Global Religions and the Media
8) Christian Nationalism
9) Discourse, Religion, and Law

The Sociology of Religion Group of AAR regularly co-sponsors panels with the peer-reviewed print and online journal Critical Research on Religion (CRR) (http://crr.sagepub.com). Published by SAGE Publications, the journal has over 8000 subscriptions worldwide. Presenters of promising papers in SOR panels will be invited to turn their papers into articles and submit them for peer review to CRR.

Please submit paper and panel proposal through on-line system at: http://papers.aarweb.org

Conference: APAD conference : Migration, Development and Citizenship

Panel conveyors: Hicham JAMID, PhD Candidate, LISE-CNRS Cnam-Paris & ORMES, University Ibn Zohr, Agadir, hichamjmd@gmail.com

Nina SAHRAOUI, Post-doctoral Research Associate, European University Institute, Florence, nina.sahraoui@gmail.com

Research on transnational spaces in the field of migration studies, notably since the 1990s, dedicated specific attention to the transnational practices of migrants, which remedied the biased perspective of the migrant considered only through the prism of immigration and not emigration. While issues revolving around ‘assimilation’, ‘multiculturalism’ and ‘integration’ of migrants have constituted until the end of the 1980s the bulk of social science research around migration, transnationalism studies offered a new analytical approach, able to account for migrants’ ability to create and maintain economic, political and socio-cultural ties between societies of residence and origin. This transnational frame has brought about new perspectives on return migration, revealing that the concept of ‘return’ far from equating definitive return, could be conceptualised as a stage, a phase of the migratory trajectory that needs to be studied in all its dimensions across time and space (Petit et al., 2007). Conceptualising the migrant as a ‘transmigrant’ (Glick Schiller et. al., 1995) sheds light on other dynamics engendered by migration, notably social (Levitt, 1998) and political remittances (Ostergaard-Nielsen, 2003; Collyer, 2014). The study of transnational practices of migrants equally led to an increased scholarly interest for the implications of migration for non-migrant individuals and communities (Levitt and Lamba-Nieves, 2013).

Overall, the development of research in this field has, however, rarely relied on intersectional analytical frames. Several theoretical propositions appear nevertheless to be relevant to intersectional analyses of power relations within transnational practices, such as Floya Anthias’ conceptualisation of ‘translocational positionality’ (Anthias, 2012) or Sarah Mahler and Patricia Pessar’s work on ‘gendered geographies of power’ (Mahler and Pessar, 2001). This panel wishes to dedicate specific attention to gendered and classed analyses of transnational citizenship practices, social remittances, and circular/return migration.

This call invites papers, in French or English, which consider (notably but not only) the following topics:

· circular/return migration, and notably intersectional analyses of these migration patterns;

· forms of social remittances, case studies and typologies ;

· impacts of new technologies on social and political remittances ;

· social remittances of migrants and development issues ;

· social remittances as multidirectional phenomenon between society of departure and society of residence ;

· transnational citizenship practices and their social, civic and political implications for societies of origin ;

· circular/return migration in the light of issues around nationality, citizenship and dual citizenship;

· the implications of emigration and circular/return migration on non-migrant individuals/ families/ communities.

All social sciences disciplines are relevant to this call and interdisciplinary approaches are of particular interest.

Proposals, of 500 words maximum, should be sent by December, 10th, 2017 to Hicham Jamid (hichamjmd@gmail.com) and Nina Sahraoui (nina.sahraoui@gmail.com) and indicate name of author, current position and affiliation. Proposals should specify the main research question, the theoretical framework as well as the methodology followed for the collection of the data mobilised in the paper.

Full communication papers need to be submitted by April 1st, 2018.

Practical information (to be found on the conference website):

This panel is organised in the framework of the APAD (the Association for the Anthropology of Social Change and Development) 2018 conference ‘Migration, Development and Citizenship’ to be held in Roskilde, Denmark, 23-25 Mai 2018.

The Conference languages are English and French.

Registration: Full rate for standard registration: €160. The standard registration fee includes documentation, lunch, coffee-breaks, cocktail and APAD fees for 2018 (+ including one issue of Anthropology & development, APAD journal).

Concession rate (APAD members): €120.

Some grants will be available for African scholars. APAD will organise a writing workshop in March 2018 for young African scholars with a selected paper.

For more information: http://apad-association.org/en/2018-conference/

Doctoral and Postdoctoral Researchers

The Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity (Department for Socio-Cultural Diversity) wishes to appoint highly qualified candidates for up to four new research positions at the doctoral and postdoctoral level. For all the positions, applicants should have a degree in anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, or another relevant social science. Successful applicants’ research interests, experience and publications should be relevant to themes and topics within the Department for Socio-Cultural Diversity (see www.mmg.mpg.de).