Summer School in Ethnography, 10-14 September – University of Trento

Dear Colleagues,

The Department of Sociology and Social Research at the University of Trento is organising a Summer School in Ethnography, 10th – 14th September 2018.

It is addressed primarily to Master, PhD and Post-Doctoral students and will be devoted to the interrelated topics of Diaspora, Emotions and Families in Urban Contexts.  

Our keynote speakers will be Henrike Donner (Goldsmith, University of London), Ghassan Hage (University of Melbourne), Michele Lancione (University of Sheffield), Maruska Svasek (Queen’s University Belfast).

Please find more information in the attachment.

Deadline for application: 30th April.

Thank you for circulating the call among those who might be interested!

Best wishes,

Ester

Ester Gallo, PhD

Lecturer in Anthropology
Department of Sociology and Social Research
Via Verdi 26
38122 Trento, Italy
2017 The Fall of Gods. Memory, Kinship and Middle Classes in South India. Oxford University Press
2016 (with F.Scrinzi) Migration, Masculinities and Reproductive Labour. Men of the Home. Palgrave MacMillan

PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia

Hi everyone,
 
Please see below invitation for PHD scholarships information. Send on behalf of Dr Halafoff.
 
With best wishes,
Milad.
 
Dr Milad Milani | Lecturer in Islamic history and the study of religion
Communications Officer
 
cid:image001.jpg@01D38F76.431B93B0 
PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia 
The University of Tasmania has a long and distinguished history of innovation and research excellence.  Building on our distinctive island environment and intellectual capacity to solve global challenges, we have cemented a position within the top 2% of research institutions worldwide. The College of Arts, Law & Education, School of Social Sciences is offering a 3-year fully funded PhD scholarship for an Honours or equivalent graduate in Sociology and Criminology. This scholarship provides $27,082 per annum (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. 
The research project
This project is one part of a larger ARC Discovery project on religious diversity in Australia led by Douglas Ezzy (University of Tasmania), Gary Bouma (Monash University), Greg Barton and Anna Halafoff (both from Deakin University).  The PhD project involves a study of the interfaith movement in Australia, focusing on evaluating their impact on responses to religious diversity. Interfaith organisations play significant roles in promoting respect for religious diversity, community policing, prison and health care chaplaincy, responses to disasters, and advancing the social cohesion that is crucial to countering violent extremism. The project involves research with leaders and activists in the Australian interfaith movement about the benefits of and challenges faced in their activities and their experience of liaising with state actors, including police and the media.  The PhD is at the University of Tasmania and will be supervised by Professor Douglas Ezzy and Dr Anna Halafoff.
Eligibility
The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis; 
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills. 
  • Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  
Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Sociology and/or Religious Studies and experience in qualitative and/or quantitative methods.
How to apply
Applicants should contact Professor Douglas Ezzy at the School of Social Sciences (
Douglas.Ezzy@utas.edu.au) for more information and to discuss their suitability for the project.  Suitable applicants will then be asked to complete an application via the University of Tasmania’s Online Application System
 

Important Notice: The contents of this email are intended solely for the named addressee and are confidential; any unauthorised use, reproduction or storage of the contents is expressly prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please delete it and any attachments immediately and advise the sender by return email or telephone.

Deakin University does not warrant that this email and any attachments are error or virus free.

Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities in Oceania

Dear all,
I’d like to invite you to submit abstracts to the interdisciplinary symposium *Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities in Oceania.* More information below and in the attached flyer. Please circulate this widely.
Date: 17-18 of August, 2018

Venue: Alphacrucis College, Parramatta

 Abstracts due: 30 April, 2018 (title, 250-word abstract, short bio)

Submit toingrid.ryan@ac.edu.au

 Keynote Speaker: Debra McDougall (Melbourne University)

‘Crashing waves: The transnational force of Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity in Oceania and beyond’

 Symposium Theme

This symposium will explore the growth, movement and influence of Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities in Oceania. It will consider PCCs as a powerful cultural force within Australasian and Oceanic communities and their role in reconfiguring spatial, social, political and cultural relationships. While the causative influences of PCCs in Oceania are contemplated, the symposium will also look at the overarching cultural, economic and political milieus in which PCCs are embedded. Additionally, a consideration of PCC’s broader transnational scope of influence will enrich this cross-cultural and interdisciplinary dialogue.

 Possible topics:

·         Historical developments

·         Transnational Networks

·         Settler colonial/Postcolonial studies

·         Missionary activities

·         Cultural translation, negotiation, adaptation

·         Politics in Oceania and beyond

·         Media, music, Information Communication Technologies

·         Branding and marketing

·         Late modernity and global capitalism

·         Material culture and lived experiences

·         Aesthetics and embodied practices

·         Social justice movements/activism

·         Migration and (im)mobility

·         Gender, class, ethnicity

·         Youth cultures

 

 

Cristina

 

Associate Professor Cristina Rocha|ARC Future Fellow

Director of Religion and Society Research Cluster

Western Sydney University

President: Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Editor: Journal of Global Buddhism

Editor: Religion in the Americas series, Brill 

http://www.uws.edu.au/religion_and_society/people/researchers/dr_cristina_rocha

 

New book: John of God: The Globalization of Brazilian Faith Healing (OUP, 2017)

 

PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia

 PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia 

The University of Tasmania has a long and distinguished history of innovation and research excellence.  Building on our distinctive island environment and intellectual capacity to solve global challenges, we have cemented a position within the top 2% of research institutions worldwide. The College of Arts, Law & Education, School of Social Sciences is offering a 3-year fully funded PhD scholarship for an Honours or equivalent graduate in Sociology and Criminology. This scholarship provides $27,082 per annum (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

The research project
This project is one part of a larger ARC Discovery project on religious diversity in Australia led by Douglas Ezzy (University of Tasmania), Gary Bouma (Monash University), Greg Barton and Anna Halafoff (both from Deakin University).  The PhD project involves a study of the interfaith movement in Australia, focusing on evaluating their impact on responses to religious diversity. Interfaith organisations play significant roles in promoting respect for religious diversity, community policing, prison and health care chaplaincy, responses to disasters, and advancing the social cohesion that is crucial to countering violent extremism. The project involves research with leaders and activists in the Australian interfaith movement about the benefits of and challenges faced in their activities and their experience of liaising with state actors, including police and the media.  The PhD is at the University of Tasmania and will be supervised by Professor Douglas Ezzy and Dr Anna Halafoff.

Eligibility
The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Sociology and/or Religious Studies and experience in qualitative and/or quantitative methods.

How to apply
Applicants should contact Professor Douglas Ezzy at the School of Social Sciences (Douglas.Ezzy@utas.edu.au) for more information and to discuss their suitability for the project.  Suitable applicants will then be asked to complete an application via the University of Tasmania’s Online Application System

Posted in Uncategorized

CfP on “cosmopolitan enclaves”, EASA 2018

We would like to invite papers for our panel “Cosmopolitan enclave. Tensions and paradoxes” at the EASA Conference in Stockholm (Aug 14-17).
Short abstract
This panel will discuss the concept of ‘cosmopolitan enclaves’ in its spatial, economic and social dimensions. In particular, it will address the theoretical and empirical relevance of rearticulating mobility and space for understanding the paradoxes of cosmopolitan enclavement.
Long abstract
This panel will offer theoretical and ethnographic insights into the concept of ‘cosmopolitan enclaves’. In particular, it will address the telling tensions and scholarly potential of combining the transnational ideal of cosmopolitanism (e.g. Hannerz, 1990; Vertovec & Cohen, 2002) with the exclusive segregation implied by the concept of spatial, economic or social enclaves (e.g. Portes & Manning, 1985; Ferguson, 2005; Ballif, 2009). It will address the paradoxical localization of these social spaces, and discuss how far certain actors rely on cosmopolitan enclaves as a resource for (im)mobility and territorial claims. The panel will further consider which stances are developed from within these enclaves towards outsiders—so-called non-cosmopolitan locals—and how practices of inclusion and exclusion reinforce enclaves’ boundaries.
Possible questions for individual papers include: What practices and representations of geographic mobility support the creation and reproduction of cosmopolitan enclaves? What are the specific attributes of such spaces, what are their underlying territorial claims, and what are their implicit ‘admission criteria’? How do they favor (unequal) access to specific resources? How far do these cosmopolitan enclaves participate to (counter)hegemonic narratives? How are enclave boundaries created and maintained?
Through both theoretical inputs and a range of case studies (involving, for example, international schools, transnational social activism, expat communities, multinational companies, expert communities, high end resorts, NGOs, religious communities…), this panel will shed light on how a localized cosmopolitan stance can both reinforce and undermine the formation of enclavement, keeping a keen eye on its political and social implications.
Deadline is April 9 2018.
Best wishes,
Jeanne

Dr. Jeanne Rey

Research fellow

SNSF Grant holder Ambizione

Department of Anthropology and Sociology of Development

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
Chemin Eugène-Rigot 2
Case Postale 136
CH-1211 Genève 21

Beyond the Islamic Revolution Perceptions of Modernity and Tradition in Iran before and after 197

Ed. by Sheikhzadegan, Amir / Meier, Astrid

Series:Welten des Islams – Worlds of Islam – Mondes de l’Islam

Aims and Scope

The volume contributes to a better understanding of Iranian history since 1953, with a focus on societal change and its reflection in intellectual discourse. The papers explore the attitudes of Iranians toward modernity and tradition before and after the Revolution of 1979. With insights from Oriental studies, history, sociology, literature and social anthropology, the volume offers a cross-disciplinary perspective on the intellectual, political, and social history of Iran.

Changing Face of European Pilgrimage

Pilgrimage Studies Network

EASA2018 conference: Staying, Moving, Settling
Stockholm University, 14-17th August 2018

PILNET panel: Changing Face of European Pilgrimage

Convenors
– John Eade (University of Roehampton and University of Toronto)
– Mario Katić (University of Zadar)

Short abstract
In this panel we want to examine intellectual contributions and debates involving the anthropological study of pilgrimage both across Europe and further afield. We want to locate the region within a global context where research draws on both European and non-European traditions.

Long abstract
In the rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field of pilgrimage studies, which covers not just religious pilgrimage but other key forms such as secular pilgrimage, spiritual pilgrimage, dark tourism, the relationship between travel, tourism and pilgrimage, many of the theoretical debates, methodological approaches and researchers have focused on the European context and most contributors are European in origin. In contemporary Europe the influence of different types of migration and tourism is becoming evident at some major Christian shrines and has also led to the emergence of non-Christian sites (primarily Hindu, Buddhist and Muslim). The diversity and complexity of pilgrimage practices is also apparent at more local shrines in the Balkans and the Mediterranean, for example, as members of trans-local communities return to their native countries during the summer holidays or re-settle. The growth of spiritual and secular pilgrimage and religious tourism adds to this diversity and complexity. Battlefield tourism and military pilgrimage illustrate the importance of cultural heritage since Europe continues to act as a magnet to non-European visitors, such as Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders, who feel connected through a shared past. In this panel we want to examine intellectual contributions and debates involving the anthropological study of pilgrimage (religious, spiritual, secular etc) both across Europe and further afield. We want to locate the region within a global context where research draws on both European and non-European traditions. We want to discuss not only the issues of reflexivity and autobiography but also discursive traditions linked to political and cultural systems.
To propose a paper:
https://nomadit.co.uk/easa/easa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6479

Posted in Uncategorized

RC-22 Newsletter #18

Issue #18 of the Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion’s newsletter is now available on our website or by clicking the picture below.  The newsletter contains information about the upcoming World Congress of Sociology.  Our Program Coordinators — Anna Halafoff, Carolyn Starkey, and Sam Han — have done a wonderful job putting together an exciting program.  I hope that you will be able to join us in Toronto next summer.

The newsletter also contains a call for nominations for the next President, Secretary-Treasurer, and Board Members.  See the newsletter for details.

Best,
Jim Spickard
RC-22 President

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Changing Face of European Pilgrimage

Pilgrimage Studies Network

EASA2018 conference: Staying, Moving, Settling
Stockholm University, 14-17th August 2018

PILNET panel: Changing Face of European Pilgrimage

Convenors
– John Eade (University of Roehampton and University of Toronto)
– Mario Katić (University of Zadar)

Short abstract
In this panel we want to examine intellectual contributions and debates involving the anthropological study of pilgrimage both across Europe and further afield. We want to locate the region within a global context where research draws on both European and non-European traditions.

Long abstract
In the rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field of pilgrimage studies, which covers not just religious pilgrimage but other key forms such as secular pilgrimage, spiritual pilgrimage, dark tourism, the relationship between travel, tourism and pilgrimage, many of the theoretical debates, methodological approaches and researchers have focused on the European context and most contributors are European in origin. In contemporary Europe the influence of different types of migration and tourism is becoming evident at some major Christian shrines and has also led to the emergence of non-Christian sites (primarily Hindu, Buddhist and Muslim). The diversity and complexity of pilgrimage practices is also apparent at more local shrines in the Balkans and the Mediterranean, for example, as members of trans-local communities return to their native countries during the summer holidays or re-settle. The growth of spiritual and secular pilgrimage and religious tourism adds to this diversity and complexity. Battlefield tourism and military pilgrimage illustrate the importance of cultural heritage since Europe continues to act as a magnet to non-European visitors, such as Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders, who feel connected through a shared past. In this panel we want to examine intellectual contributions and debates involving the anthropological study of pilgrimage (religious, spiritual, secular etc) both across Europe and further afield. We want to locate the region within a global context where research draws on both European and non-European traditions. We want to discuss not only the issues of reflexivity and autobiography but also discursive traditions linked to political and cultural systems.
To propose a paper:
https://nomadit.co.uk/easa/easa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6479