Paper Abstract Submissions for our the ASR 2019 Annual Meeting in NYC extended to May 6!



All submissions are accepted through the Member Portal on the ASR website. Log in to your ASR account to submit a paper abstract. The submission link is in your ASR Member Portal and NOT on the general website or the Annual Meeting page. If you are not currently a member, you will need to become a member in order to log into the ASR website and submit a paper abstract. If you join the ASR or renew your membership, it may take up to a day for me to update your membership. Please email me if you have any trouble submitting your abstract.

If you have any questions about the program content of our meeting, please contact our 2019 Program Chair, Holly Folk, at holly.folk@wwu.edu.

CFP: "Public policies and the production of religious difference"

The Conference of the Dutch Association for the Study of Religion (NGG) that will be held in Groningen on 30 October – 1 November 2019 is now open.

The theme of the conference is “Religion and the Production of Difference”.

Julia Martínez Ariño is convening a panel on “Public policies and the production of religious difference”

This panel will explore how religious difference is produced, reproduced, challenged and/or ignored by public policies as well as how, inversely, notions of religious difference inform policymaking. The panel welcomes papers examining the production of religious difference, and religious-secular and religious-spiritual distinctions by public policies in fields such as urban planning and public space, education, security, immigrant integration, etc. Attention will also be given to how policy-driven categories of religious difference are received by the stakeholders and impact on individuals and groups. Papers analysing policy definitions of acceptable and non-acceptable religiosity in various social contexts and policy fields and papers interested in the reception and consequences of those definitions are also welcomed. Some of the questions that the panel will address are the following: What are the social imaginaries and policy ideas underlying public policies in relation to religion and what are the resulting categories of difference? How do different actors, religious or not, receive and react to those categories and processes of differentiation? What are the (differential) implications of these processes and categories for different religious and non-religious groups and individuals? We are interested in covering a wide range of geographical locations, theoretical perspectives and empirical approaches.

Panel convener: Julia Martínez-Ariño, University of Groningen Please, send your abstracts of no more than 250 words and a short biographical note of 100 words max. to: j.martinez.arino@rug.nl . Deadline: 1 June 2019

Scholars based in Dutch universities and abroad are invited to submit their abstracts. Deadline: 1 June 2019.

For more information, please visit the conference website: http://www.godsdienstwetenschap.nl/index.php…

Centre for Religion, Conflict and GlobalizationFaculty of Theology and Religious Studies University of GroningenNGG – Dutch Association for the Study of Religion

Interdisciplinary symposium *Pentecostal Charismatic Christianity and Migration*.

Date: 2-3 of August, 2019

Venue: Parramatta City Campus, Western Sydney University

169 Macquarie St, Parramatta, NSW, Australia

Abstracts due: 10 of April 2019 (title, 250-word abstract, short bio)

Submit to: Dr Kathleen Openshaw k.openshaw@westernsydney.edu.au

Keynote Speaker: Associate Prof Richard Vokes (University of Western Australia)

Symposium Conveners:

Prof Cristina Rocha, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU

Prof Mark Hutchinson, Alphacrucis College

Dr Kathleen Openshaw, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU

Mrs Ingrid Ryan, Alphacrucis College

Symposium Theme

Over the past few decades, Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity (PCC) has exploded in the Global South and grown considerably in the Global North. Much of this grow this fuelled by networks of megachurches, the mobility of community leaders across diasporic networks, migration and media. While traditionally missionaries would travel in a North-to- South direction, more recently megachurches from the Global South have moved horizontally, across to other developing countries, and also made inroads in to the Global North in efforts of reverse missionisation. Such attempts to missionise to locals in the Global North have been largely (though not wholly) unsuccessful and churches have turned their focus to migrants from the Global South. Many studies have shown that migrants, who were not attached to PCCs before migration, join churches in the diaspora as they offer them a home away from home. Meanwhile, diasporic churches also face difficulties keeping these (as well as second generation) migrants, since they may prefer local churches in an effort to integrate. In this symposium we probe these themes and are seeking papers on the following topics:

  • Historical developments
  • Missionary activities and migration
  • Translocal and transnational PCC networks
  • Translocal and transnational families and PCC
  • Young migrants and PCC
  • Second generation migrants and PCC
  • Gender, PCC and migration
  • City infrastructures and diasporic churches
  • Theological themes and migration
  • Cultural translation, negotiation, adaptation of migrant churches
  • PCC, media, music, information communication Technologies and migration
  • Material culture and migrants’ lived experiences in PCC churches
  • Aesthetics and embodied practices
  • Immobility, borders and PCC

Cristina

Professor Cristina Rocha

Director of Religion and Society Research Cluster

Western Sydney University

President: Australian Association for the Study of Religion

International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society, Annual Conference

Thursday 4th July – Saturday 6th July 2019

Edgbaston Park Hotel, Birmingham, UK.

Please note: support for attendance is available.

Organised by the Science and Belief in Society Research Group at the University of Birmingham, UK this is the first conference launching the new, International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society.

In the last decade there has been significant growth in social scientific scholarship on science and religion, complementing the more established historical research into the subject. Greater attention is being paid to the varied ways in which perceptions of science are influenced by religious and non-religious belief, identity, community and conflict in different geographical, cultural and historical contexts. The purpose of this international conference is to bring together researchers with backgrounds in sociology, science and technology studies, psychology, political science, history, social anthropology, and related humanities or social science disciplines to discuss perspectives on the overarching topic of science and belief in society.

Abstracts are invited for the conference relating to the following themes:

  • · The social scientific and historical study of the relationship between science and religious and/or non-religious belief and identity;
  • · Public perceptions of the relationship between science, religion and non-religion and their respective roles in society;
  • · National and international comparative perspectives on the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Past and present media or popular representations of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · The past or present roles of science, rationalism, religion and belief in national, social or cultural identity and related geopolitical narratives;
  • · Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of science, religion and non-religion in society;
  • · Methodological approaches to, and issues in, the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Avenues for future research and developments within the social scientific and historical study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Public policy research relating to any aspect of public policy that intersects with issues connected to science, religion and belief in society. Including studies on theimpact of publics’ views on science and religion on policy making, and provision for religious, spiritual or non-religious communities across a range of geographies and issues (e.g. healthcare provision, educational policy, science policy, environmental policy or development);
  • · International studies of religious or spiritual communities’ perspectives on the intersection, and possible relationships, between science and religion over time.

We are interested in papers that relate to any aspect of STEMM in society (science, technology, engineering, medicine, and mathematics) and that discuss any religious, spiritual or non-religious tradition, position or worldview, including unbelief.

Keynote papers will be given by historian Professor Peter Harrison, Australian Laureate Fellow and Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland (Australia), and psychologist Professor Cristine Legare, associate professor of psychology and the director of the Evolution, Variation, and Ontogeny of Learning Laboratory at The University of Texas at Austin (USA).

Individual paper submissions:

To submit a paper proposal, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 200 words including name, institutional affiliation, email address and if possible a web-link to your institutional bio page.

Biographies of successful applicants will be added to the International Network’s Research Directory when our new website launches in the spring. Please indicate on your application if you would like to opt out of being added to the Research Directory.

Panel session proposals:

We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals with a maximum of four speakers. To submit a panel proposal, please send a session summary of no more than 250 words alongside abstracts of no more than 300 words for each paper and biographical notes of no more than 200 words for each contributor (please include institutional affiliation(s), e-mail contact details, and other info as above).

Individual or panel session submissions may cross over several of the themes listed above, and those intending to submit papers are encouraged to consider the relevance of their work to other academic disciplines.

Please send all individual paper and session proposals to Dr Harris Wiseman (h.wiseman@bham.ac.uk) for the attention of the conference organisers, Professor Fern Elsdon-Baker (University of Birmingham), and Dr Alexander Hall (University of Birmingham).

All abstracts must be submitted by 1st March 2019.

Conference Costs and Bursaries:

Please note that for all successful applicants, accommodation and registration costs will be covered by the International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society as part of a 1 year grant from the Templeton Religion Trust.

In addition to this, a limited number of bursaries are available to support those who may not have institutional support to attend international conferences, including but not limited to: postgraduate, early career, retired, or low income or unwaged.  To request this additional support please e-mail Dr Harris Wiseman at h.wiseman@bham.ac.uk, including your contact details, a short biography (including a clear statement regarding your career stage), your abstract and a statement of interest to be considered for one of the bursaries. We also have a range of other bursaries for covering other needs (e.g. support with day care costs). The deadline for submission of bursary applications is 1st March 2019.

Please note that we will be running a fully funded early career workshop in the days prior to this conference, but this will be announced and advertised via a separate call.

Key Dates:

  • Abstract submission: Open now
  • Deadline for abstracts and conference bursary applications: 1st March 2019
  • Decision notification: 15th March 2019
  • Registration opens: 15th March 2019
  • Registration deadline for presenters: 29th March 2019

Call for Papers: American Academy of Religion, Nov 23-26, 2019

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Annual Meeting
San Diego, CA
November 23-26, 2019

Sociology of Religion Unit
Call for Papers

https://papers.aarweb.org/content/sociology-religion-unit

Statement of Purpose:

The Sociology of Religion (SOR) Unit of the American Academy of Religion (AAR) serves as a bridge between religious studies and the subdiscipline of sociology of religion. It functions as a two-way conduit not only to import sociological research into religious studies but also to export the research of religious studies into both the subdiscipline and the broader field of sociology. Only through a cross-fertilization transgressing departmental boundaries can there be breakthroughs in research in both fields. The unit has a wide conception of sociology of religion. It is open to a multiplicity of paradigms and methodologies utilized in the subfield and sociology more broadly: theoretical as well as empirical, quantitative, qualitative, and comparative-historical. By liaising with other Program Units, the Sociology of Religion Unit is able to bring the rich diversity of critical and analytical perspectives that are housed in the American Academy of Religion into mainstream sociology of religion. Conversely, it aims to provide scholars of the study of religion with a deeper understanding of the landscape of sociology of religion.

Call for Papers:
The purpose of the Sociology of Religion program unit of the American Academy of Religion is to bridge the gap and generate cross-fertilization between the Sociology of Religion and Religious Studies. We are open to papers in all areas and therefore encourage submissions of any topic relevant to the sociology of religion. This year, we are particularly interested in the following topics:

  • Topics related to San Diego (Immigration/Latinx experiences, militarism, etc.) and public intellectuals (which is the theme of the conference)
  • Pedagogical panel: sociology of religion is taught in both sociology and religious studies departments. However, in religious studies departments, so as not to conflict with the turf of sociology departments, it is often called “religion and society.” For this panel, we are interested in comparing how sociology of religion is taught in sociology and religious studies departments
  • W.E.B. DuBois’s relevance to the sociology of religion
  • A return to Jane Addams and others whose work refutes an epistemic split between sociology and activism
  • Relevance/relationship of quantitative to qualitative research
  • Applied sociology as a form of pubic intellectual work

Publication:
The Sociology of Religion Unit of AAR regularly co-sponsors panels with the peer-reviewed print and online journal Critical Research on Religion (CRR) (http://crr.sagepub.com). Published by SAGE Publications, the journal has over 8000 subscriptions worldwide and is ranked by Scopus #16 out of 432 religion journals (https://www.scimagojr.com/journalrank.php?category=1212). Presenters of promising papers in SOR panels will be invited to turn their papers into articles and submit them for peer review to CRR.

Method:

Please submit paper and session proposals through the AAR SOR Unit Portal: https://papers.aarweb.org/content/sociology-religion-unit

Process:
Proposals are anonymous to chairs and steering committee members during review, but visible to chairs prior to final acceptance or rejection

For further information, please contact AAR SOR Unit Co-Chairs:
Rebekka King, rebekka.king@mtsu.edu

Warren S. Goldstein, goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org

CFP: Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements

The Centre for the Critical Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements (CenSAMM) is pleased to announce its first annual conference, to be held at the University of Bedfordshire (Bedford Campus) 27-28 June
2019.

The theme of the conference is The Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements: Critical and Interdisciplinary Approaches.

The aim of the conference is to facilitate critical and interdisciplinary discussion of apocalypticism, millenarianism and associated movements across time, place, and culture, and will cover academic fields such as anthropology, archaeology, biblical studies, critical theory, cultural studies, history, literary studies, Political studies, psychology, religious studies, sociology, etc. The interdisciplinary scope is broadly understood to include methodologies, comparative approaches, and showcasing of research more specific to individual fields of expertise.

Speakers include:

  • John J. Collins (Yale Divinity School)
  • Vanessa Harding (Birkbeck College, University of London)
  • Bill McGuire (University College London)
  • Sarah Rollens (Rhodes College)
  • Beth Singler (University of Cambridge)
  • Fatima Tofighi (EUME, Berlin/University of Religions, Qom)
  • Paul-Francois Tremlett (Open University)

We invite individual paper proposals from scholars at all stages of their career, including postgraduates, and we welcome suggestions for group panels. Please submit proposals to conference@censamm.org.

Submissions for papers should include a 300-word abstract and short CV.
Deadline for proposals: 31 March 2019.

Please see the CenSAMM website for more information https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcensamm.org%2Fconferences&data=01%7C01%7Cmunnikm%40cardiff.ac.uk%7Cbb29cb68eed24657341e08d6610d800a%7Cbdb74b3095684856bdbf06759778fcbc%7C1&sdata=tB7V9mCVO4RkmVKpghrBa15UiCGwHcEYVm9rfh4ncuE%3D&reserved=0

CFP: Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements

The Centre for the Critical Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements (CenSAMM) is pleased to announce its first annual conference, to be held at the University of Bedfordshire (Bedford Campus) 27-28 June
2019.

The theme of the conference is The Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements: Critical and Interdisciplinary Approaches.

The aim of the conference is to facilitate critical and interdisciplinary discussion of apocalypticism, millenarianism and associated movements across time, place, and culture, and will cover academic fields such as anthropology, archaeology, biblical studies, critical theory, cultural studies, history, literary studies, Political studies, psychology, religious studies, sociology, etc. The interdisciplinary scope is broadly understood to include methodologies, comparative approaches, and showcasing of research more specific to individual fields of expertise.

Speakers include:

  • John J. Collins (Yale Divinity School)
  • Vanessa Harding (Birkbeck College, University of London)
  • Bill McGuire (University College London)
  • Sarah Rollens (Rhodes College)
  • Beth Singler (University of Cambridge)
  • Fatima Tofighi (EUME, Berlin/University of Religions, Qom)
  • Paul-Francois Tremlett (Open University)

We invite individual paper proposals from scholars at all stages of their career, including postgraduates, and we welcome suggestions for group panels. Please submit proposals to conference@censamm.org.

Submissions for papers should include a 300-word abstract and short CV.
Deadline for proposals: 31 March 2019.

Please see the CenSAMM website for more information https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcensamm.org%2Fconferences&data=01%7C01%7Cmunnikm%40cardiff.ac.uk%7Cbb29cb68eed24657341e08d6610d800a%7Cbdb74b3095684856bdbf06759778fcbc%7C1&sdata=tB7V9mCVO4RkmVKpghrBa15UiCGwHcEYVm9rfh4ncuE%3D&reserved=0

CFP: Transatlantic Roundtable on Religion & Race, Nairobi, Kenya

The Transatlantic Roundtable on Religion and Race (TRRR) invites presentation proposals for its 2019 conference, which will convene at Hekima Institute of Peace Studies and International Relations (HIPSIR), Hekima University College in Nairobi, Kenya, July 1-5.

This conference takes place against the backdrop of an era of increased political authoritarianism and a noticeable rise in racial and religious intolerance across the world. In Africa the issues of migration, review of conflict intervention mechanisms and an ideological shift on the war on terrorism have raised questions on US strategy in Africa. There has also been a noticeable increase in recent years of suspicions toward known and settled facts and of an economic and cultural nationalism that is fuelling conflicts across the World.

This time of global uncertainty requires a bold and progressive agenda, that also recognizes assets and cultures of cooperation to challenge the existing order. We seek papers that will address these issues with urgency, clarity and an understanding of what is at stake and what can be imagined.

Themes to be addressed include:
  *   Political and Religious Authoritarianism: Past, Present and Future
  *   Deconstructing Conflict, Violence and Sovereignty in Africa and Across the Diaspora
  *   Assets, Cooperatives and the Culture of Cooperation
  *   Patriarchy, Sexism and the Role of Culture in Africa and the Diaspora
  *   Faith-based Responses to the Immigration Crisis
  *   New Formations of African Identity on the Continent and Across the Diaspora
  *   Old Media New Media, Social Media and the Production of Knowledge-based Development
  *   Religion, Race and Morality in the Age of New Social Movements

We invite analysis of these and other tensions at the intersections of religion, race, class, gender and nationality, especially bearing upon faith sector positioning and responses within Africa and diasporic contexts. Contemporary and historical analysis of these contexts are welcome. Best practices presentations and scholarly papers should be outlined in an abstract of 250 words or fewer and emailed by January 30th, 2019 to Dr. William Ackah  (w.ackah@bbk.ac.uk<mailto:w.ackah@bbk.ac.uk>) and Dr. R. Drew Smith (rsmith@pts.edumailto:rsmith@pts.edu).

Further details at: http://www.religionandrace.org

CFP: “Church-State Relations: Religion in the Public Square”

International Conference in Manilla, July 26-27, 2019

We are pleased to announce the International Conference in Theology and Religious Studies, jointly organized by Liverpool Hope University (LHU) through the Andrew Walls Center for the Study of African and Asian Christianity and the Theology and Religious Education Department of De la Salle University (DLSU), Manila, Philippines. The Conference shall take place on July 26 – 27, 2019 in De La Salle University Manila, Philippines under the theme, “Church-State Relations: Religion in the Public Square”. The Conference shall bring together scholars engaged in the academic study of Theology/ Religion in public life in Asia and other regions. The conference will have paper presentations from notable scholars from Europe, Asia and the Philippines.

The “separation of Church and State” is a modern development that ensures freedom of religious expression. At the same time, it prevents governments from imposing particular religious doctrines on everyone. While modern states have upheld the separation between Church and State, the Church, in particular, has supported particular political interventions, movements, and advocacies pertaining to moral issues (e.g. on dictatorships and other human rights violations, legislations on reproductive health issues, divorce, LGBTQ rights, etc.).

This conference therefore explores the varied ways of living out and interpreting the separation and interaction between Church and State. It seeks to respond to the questions: What have been the various models of relations between Church and State? How has religion informed public advocacy? What were the extra and intra-ecclesial factors that shaped religious intervention? What were the consequences of such relations? What can scholarship learn from the experiences that is useful for facing issues today?

We invite scholars from other regions to join in the interdisciplinary conversations to understand the challenges Church-State relations pose for theological reflection and religious studies.

Follow this link for online registration: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfUHCExTLFwWgotWdMl2_8ZGrG24gW0lEaZ_3bmczI4fvxZUw/viewform

  • Please send your abstracts (250 words) with 5 keywords (and brief author background) to rito.baring@dlsu.edu.ph by December 15, 2018
  • Payment Schemes for the Conference Registration (Inclusive of Simple Conference Kit, 2 Lunches, 4 snacks and certificates):

Local Participants Regular Registration – Php 1,500

Foreign Participants – US $ 50.00 – UCPB P. Ocampo Branch Savings Account 01-120-300035-8 Swift Code: UCPBPHMM

For other conference-related inquiries, kindly email: rito.baring@dlsu.edu.ph

thank you.

Dr. Rito Baring

Chair

Theology and Religious Education Department

De La Salle University

Manila

Call for Papers: Methodological Challenges in Studying Digital Religion (Open Session)

EASR 2019: Religion – Continuations and Disruptions

(Chairs: Frederik Elwert and Maren Freudenberg, Ruhr University Bochum)

Changes and disruptions in the religious field challenge the methodological approaches of scholars studying the field, as new phenomena might require modification to traditional methods or require new methods altogether. This holds particularly true for the rapid changes due to the digitization of society and the emergence of digital religious forms. Scholars face difficulties applying traditional qualitative and quantitative methods to the Internet and other digital spaces, which only partly mirror offline phenomena.

For example, when it comes to webpages, traditional methods of visual and textual analysis are of limited help, given the multi-modality and non-linearity of visual, textual, and audio components and the discrepancies between the user paths intended by the web design and the actual paths taken by users. There are, indeed, many aspects of digital spaces that can inform the study of digital religion, including networks of actions and platforms, interconnections between users, and non-traditional forms of expression. Therefore, there are some questions that need to be explored: In which ways can we, as scholars, approach digital venues? What is the impact of the chosen methodology on the object of study?

Thus we invite scholars to discuss the methodological challenges they face when studying digital religion.

These might include but are not limited to

  • * multi-mediality of websites, e.g. text and image and video,
  • * interactivity and usage studies,
  • * non-linearity and network structures of web pages,
  • * availability of large-scale data, e.g. web forums, YouTube comments,
  • * multi-method studies (ex. textual analysis combined with interviews),
  • * social network analysis of social media data, e.g. Twitter.
  • While some of the challenges can be discussed from an abstract methodological perspective, many of them become apparent through concrete experiences in studying digital religion. The panel puts emphasis on the reflection of methodological approaches and challenges rooted in empirical studies that deal with specific cases of digital religion. However, more theoretical contributions are also invited.
  • Case studies can include (but are by no means limited to)
  • * the online self-representation of minority religions,
  • * the appropriation of digital media by majority religions,
  • * digital media beyond the web, e.g. mobile apps,
  • * networks of religious media,
  • * examples of religious contact and material forms of religion on the Internet,
  • * hashtags as a frame for religious communication in the web (for example to foster critical discourses of religion).

We welcome innovative and interdisciplinary contributions that bring together new empirical and methodological perspectives, especially if they focus on under-researched phenomena. A possible outcome of the session is a special journal issue on methods for the study of digital religion.

If you are interested in submitting an abstract to this open session, please do so by December 15, 2018 on the conference website: https://easr2019.org/call-for-individual-papers/

We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Dr. Maren Freudenberg