Call for Papers: SISR/ISSR Conference in Barcelona, July 9-12, 2019

The next conference of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion (ISSR) will take place in Barcelona, 9-12 July, 2019.  The conference theme is: “The Politics of Religion and Spirituality”.

The deadline for paper submissions is the 16th December 2018.  Please submit your titles and abstracts at:  https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/call-for-papers

Practical information on the conference location, transports, accommodation etc. from the Local Committee can be found here: https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/conference-2019

See you in Barcelona !
Jörg Stolz, Véronique Altglas, Olivier Servais, Inger Furseth
Executive Committee ISSR

CFP: RC22-Sponsored Sessions at the SISR/ISSR Meeting in Barcelona

ISA’s Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion is co-sponsoring sessions at the next meeting of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion (ISSR) in Barcelona, 9-12 July, 2019.  The conference theme is: “The Politics of Religion and Spirituality”.

Papers may be presented in either English or French.  The deadline for to submit proposals is the 16th December 2018.  Please submit your titles and abstracts at:  https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/call-for-papers

Here are the joint sessions  and other sessions sponsored by ISA members:

1) Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?

Conveners:
Jim Spickard, University of Redlands jim_spickard@redlands.edu
Marian Burchardt, University of Leipzig marian_burchardt@uni-leipzig.de

Abstract: There have been several recent claims that sociology needs to be “decolonized”. Some authors focus on the discipline’s tendency to apply Euro-American models of society to the rest of the world, whether or not those models adequately illuminate those local social patterns (Akiwowo 1988; Park 1988; Gutiérrez Rodriquez et al. 2010; Go 2016). Others focus on the structure of its intellectual production, including its valorizing of “Northern” intellectuals and institutions over the intellectuals and institutions of the “Global South” (Gareau 1988; Steinmetz 2013; Qi 2014; Connell 2018).* Others explore alternative sociologies by locating ideas from non-Western sources that increase our understanding of Western societies as well as their own (Connell 2007; Alatas 2014; Spickard 2017). All these efforts take place in the context of wider critiques of Euro-American intellectual dominance in several fields (Bulbeck 1998; Alatas 2006; Bhambra 2007; Patel 2010; Reuter and Villa 2010).

Euro-American approaches to the sociology of religion have also had their critics (Bender et al. 2013; Spickard 2017). Few of these, however, have engaged deeply with postcolonial thinking, nor with the effect that global power imbalances have on the subdiscipline’s intellectual content. Nor have most of them engaged with the concept “decolonializing” itself—a distinctly problematic term (Barker et al. 1994; Harding 1998; Young 2001; Cooper 2005; Go 2016).

This session offers participants an opportunity to join this discussion. We seek paper proposals that do one or more of the following:

  1. Address the limitations of contemporary approaches to the sociology of religion in the context of global inequality and cultural difference.
  2. Assess the nuances, strengths, and weaknesses of the decolonization paradigm for improving the sociology of religion.
  3. Explore alternatives to standard approaches in the sociology of religion, particularly those that stem from ignored, repressed, or otherwise overlooked positions in the global field.

We welcome paper proposals that will produce a rich discussion.

2) The Politics of Religion and Spirituality in Cross Cultural Research

Convener(s):
Jualynne E. Dodson (RC-22 Member)
Michigan State University
dodsonj2@msu.edu

Abstract: In our globalized world, societies are progressively more politically active and diverse in demographic characteristics and religious practices. Sociology of Religion is challenged by these realities even as we study politics, religion and their interrelated impact in a variety of cultural situations. A fundamental question is whether research has provided systematic knowledge on humans’ socio-religious practices that is sufficiently accurate and culturally grounded to equal ‘baseline data’ for further predictive investigations. We need culturally reflective comprehensions about religion, spirituality, and socio-political issues, including their interrelatedness, to ensure the integrity of our data findings for guiding human society to more inclusive and productive goals. This is a RC-22 proposal for a thematic session on topics related to politics, religion, spirituality and cross-cultural research. The session wishes papers that share research experiences and findings from reflective studies of religion in cultures not their own. The session is open for papers but core presentations will be from work of three investigators who study organic, Africa-inspired religious traditions in Cuba’s eastern region. The three persons have agreed to present papers on: “The Political Life of Spirits: Palo Monte/Mayombe in Oriente, Cuba,” “Organic Religious Production & Shifting Political Landscapes: Cuba” and “Swearing Oaths and Prophesying Ruin: Plácido as a Prophet of the African Diaspora.” I propose to Chair the session and can present a paper if that will complete a panel. It also is possible that there could be a sufficient number of paper proposals to equal two or more panels. I am open.

3) Social Theory and Religion 2

Convener(s):
Titus HJELM, University College London, t.hjelm@ucl.ac.uk
James V. SPICKARD,(RC22 Member) University of Redlands, jim_spickard@redlands.edu

Abstract: The aim of this session is to stimulate the debate about theoretical ideas that have a bearing on sociological research on religion. Contributions are welcome from researchers applying both familiar and less familiar traditions of social theory to the study of religion.

CFP: RC22-Sponsored Sessions at the SISR/ISSR Meeting in Barcelona

ISA’s Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion is co-sponsoring sessions at the next meeting of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion (ISSR) in Barcelona, 9-12 July, 2019.  The conference theme is: “The Politics of Religion and Spirituality”.

Papers may be presented in either English or French.  The deadline for to submit proposals is the 16th December 2018.  Please submit your titles and abstracts at:  https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/call-for-papers

Here are the joint sessions  and other sessions sponsored by ISA members:

1) Decolonizing the Sociology of Religion?

Conveners:
Jim Spickard, University of Redlands jim_spickard@redlands.edu
Marian Burchardt, University of Leipzig marian_burchardt@uni-leipzig.de

Abstract: There have been several recent claims that sociology needs to be “decolonized”. Some authors focus on the discipline’s tendency to apply Euro-American models of society to the rest of the world, whether or not those models adequately illuminate those local social patterns (Akiwowo 1988; Park 1988; Gutiérrez Rodriquez et al. 2010; Go 2016). Others focus on the structure of its intellectual production, including its valorizing of “Northern” intellectuals and institutions over the intellectuals and institutions of the “Global South” (Gareau 1988; Steinmetz 2013; Qi 2014; Connell 2018).* Others explore alternative sociologies by locating ideas from non-Western sources that increase our understanding of Western societies as well as their own (Connell 2007; Alatas 2014; Spickard 2017). All these efforts take place in the context of wider critiques of Euro-American intellectual dominance in several fields (Bulbeck 1998; Alatas 2006; Bhambra 2007; Patel 2010; Reuter and Villa 2010).

Euro-American approaches to the sociology of religion have also had their critics (Bender et al. 2013; Spickard 2017). Few of these, however, have engaged deeply with postcolonial thinking, nor with the effect that global power imbalances have on the subdiscipline’s intellectual content. Nor have most of them engaged with the concept “decolonializing” itself—a distinctly problematic term (Barker et al. 1994; Harding 1998; Young 2001; Cooper 2005; Go 2016).

This session offers participants an opportunity to join this discussion. We seek paper proposals that do one or more of the following:

  1. Address the limitations of contemporary approaches to the sociology of religion in the context of global inequality and cultural difference.
  2. Assess the nuances, strengths, and weaknesses of the decolonization paradigm for improving the sociology of religion.
  3. Explore alternatives to standard approaches in the sociology of religion, particularly those that stem from ignored, repressed, or otherwise overlooked positions in the global field.

We welcome paper proposals that will produce a rich discussion.

2) The Politics of Religion and Spirituality in Cross Cultural Research

Convener(s):
Jualynne E. Dodson (RC-22 Member)
Michigan State University
dodsonj2@msu.edu

Abstract: In our globalized world, societies are progressively more politically active and diverse in demographic characteristics and religious practices. Sociology of Religion is challenged by these realities even as we study politics, religion and their interrelated impact in a variety of cultural situations. A fundamental question is whether research has provided systematic knowledge on humans’ socio-religious practices that is sufficiently accurate and culturally grounded to equal ‘baseline data’ for further predictive investigations. We need culturally reflective comprehensions about religion, spirituality, and socio-political issues, including their interrelatedness, to ensure the integrity of our data findings for guiding human society to more inclusive and productive goals. This is a RC-22 proposal for a thematic session on topics related to politics, religion, spirituality and cross-cultural research. The session wishes papers that share research experiences and findings from reflective studies of religion in cultures not their own. The session is open for papers but core presentations will be from work of three investigators who study organic, Africa-inspired religious traditions in Cuba’s eastern region. The three persons have agreed to present papers on: “The Political Life of Spirits: Palo Monte/Mayombe in Oriente, Cuba,” “Organic Religious Production & Shifting Political Landscapes: Cuba” and “Swearing Oaths and Prophesying Ruin: Plácido as a Prophet of the African Diaspora.” I propose to Chair the session and can present a paper if that will complete a panel. It also is possible that there could be a sufficient number of paper proposals to equal two or more panels. I am open.

3) Social Theory and Religion 2

Convener(s):
Titus HJELM, University College London, t.hjelm@ucl.ac.uk
James V. SPICKARD,(RC22 Member) University of Redlands, jim_spickard@redlands.edu

Abstract: The aim of this session is to stimulate the debate about theoretical ideas that have a bearing on sociological research on religion. Contributions are welcome from researchers applying both familiar and less familiar traditions of social theory to the study of religion.

Early CFP: Association for the Sociology of Religion Annual Meeting

Our Program Committee is hard at work planning for our 2019 meeting in New York, “Engaging Religion in a Contested Age.” You can look forward to two engaging joint ASA/ASR sessions, an insightful Presidential Address by our President, Paula D. Nesbitt, a thought-provoking Furfey Lecture, and plenty of socializing opportunities during our three evening receptions. In fact, our welcome reception on August 11 will be a joint reception with the ASA Religion Section.

Our meeting will be held at the Park Central New York Hotel located at 870 Seventh St., just a few steps from the ASA hotel. Stay turned for hotel reservation information so you can get the discounted ASR price on a room. Rooms with king beds will be $185/night, and rooms with two double beds will be $205/night.

INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING A COMPLETED SESSION PROPOSAL OR PAPER ABSTRACT?

Complete session proposals are due by March 31, and paper abstracts are due by April 30. All submissions will be accepted through the Member Portal on the ASR website. Stay tuned for additional information regarding when the submission process opens. If you have any questions about the program content of our meeting, please contact our 2019 Program Chair, Holly Folk, at holly.folk@wwu.edu.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE ANNUAL MEETING IS AVAILABLE

Please visit the Grants & Awards page on the ASR website for information on the Gallagher Travel Grants along with other grant and award opportunities.

www.sociologyofreligion.com

Call for Papers: International Society for the Sociology of Religion conference

The next conference of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion (ISSR) will take place in Barcelona, 9-12 July, 2019.  The conference theme is: “The Politics of Religion and Spirituality”.

The deadline for paper submissions is the 16th December 2018.  Please submit your titles and abstracts at:  https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/call-for-papers

Practical information on the conference location, transports, accommodation etc. from the Local Committee can be found here: https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/conference-2019

See you in Barcelona !
Jörg Stolz, Véronique Altglas, Olivier Servais, Inger Furseth
Executive Committee ISSR

CFP: Artificial Intelligence and International Relations – April 12, 2019 Shanghai University

Conference: Artificial Intelligence and International Relations 

April 12, 2019

Shanghai University

Organized by 

The Center for Global Governance  

Institute of Global Studies 

Shanghai University

People’s Republic of China

http://internationalstudiesandsociology.blogspot.com/2018/07/artificial-intelligence-and-social.html

http://internationalstudiesandsociology.blogspot.com/2018/07/conference-artificial-intelligence-and.html

This is the first conference on this topic. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Artificial Intelligence and International Relations
  • Artificial Intelligence and Politics
  • Artificial Intelligence and Work/Labor
  • Artificial Intelligence and Religion
  • Artificial Intelligence and Security
  • Artificial Intelligence and Gender
  • Artificial Intelligence and Society
  • Artificial Intelligence and Human Rights

Please submit the following information for abstract submission:

  • Author full name;
  • Affiliation;
  • Email address: university email address should be provided;
  • Abstract in Word format;
  • Title of your paper;
  • A short bio, 100 words (not CV or resume).

To: tugrulkeskin@t.shu.edu.cn

Or

Ryan Kiggins rkiggins@uco.edu  

IMPORTANT DATES · 

  • Abstract Submission for the Conference:       February 4, 2019
  • Official Acceptance Letter:                             February 11, 2019
  • Official Invitation Letter for VISA:               February 18, 2019
  • Confirmation of Your Participation:               February 25, 2019
  • Conference Draft Paper Submission:              March 25, 2019  
  • The Conference Dates:                                   April 12, 2019

OFFICAL ACCEPTANCE AND INVITATION LETTER AND VISA:

If your paper is accepted by the conference committee, first you will receive an official acceptance letter. Then, you need to email us a pdf or jpeg copy of the first page of your passport for you to receive official invitation letter from Shanghai University for VISA application. 

There is no fee for this conference. please note that we will cover your accommodations (lehu hotel, Shanghai University)  for 3 nights and food during your stay in Shanghai.

When:  April 12, 2019

Where: Shanghai University

Lehu Hotel, 99 Shangda Road, 

BaoShan District, Shanghai 20044 – China

Time:   9:00 – 17:00

For more information, please contact:

Tugrul Keskin 

tugruk@vt.edu or tugrulkeskin@t.shu.edu.cn 

Ryan Kiggins 

rkiggins@uco.edu  

Tugrul Keskin

Professor

Director of Center for the Global Governance 

Shanghai University  

Email: tugrulkeskin@t.shu.edu.cn

China: 86+15000-465734

Turkey Cell: (90) 533-607-8465

Recent Books:

·         Middle East Studies after September 11 Neo-Orientalism, American Hegemony and Academia. Brill, 2018. https://brill.com/view/title/26757

·         U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East: From American Missionaries to the Islamic State. Routledge, 2018. https://www.routledge.com/US-Foreign-Policy-in-the-Middle-East-From-American-Missionaries-to-the/Gresh-Keskin/p/book/9780815347149

Editor of Sociology of Islam Journal (Brill)

http://www.brill.nl/sociology-islam

Region Editor of Critical Sociology (Middle East and North Africa)

http://crs.sagepub.com/

Call for papers for a special edition: Fashion/Religion Interfaces TM

Call for papers for a special edition: Fashion/Religion Interfaces

The complex interconnections between religious beliefs and fashion in clothing have been increasingly recognised by researchers, journalists and fashion producers. At the same time, fashion has begun to be a force that can shape religious communities and create debates, often of a controversial nature, within and between faiths. This special issue will explore these matters, focusing on sartorial fashion/religion interfaces in their diverse and multiple forms across the world today.

Fashion scholarship has long claimed that no-one exists fully outside of fashion systems. Yet many religious believers, especially those with more conservative mindsets, think that they are not influenced by secular and commercial fashion trends. So, who is right? At the same time, some religiously-oriented individuals may embrace fashion fully, while others might seek to balance fashionability with religious precepts and forms of conduct. Which sorts of balancing and mediating are occurring across the world today, among different religious groups in diverse locations? Which social and cultural forces and contexts shape these balancing acts? What are the differences between religiously-oriented dress practices in ‘home’ countries and in diasporic contexts? How are these matters bound up with globalization processes?

Most scholarly attention on fashion/religion interfaces has been on women’s dress practices, but what about men? In what ways do dynamics to do with sexualities, ethnicities, classes, disabilities, and other social factors impact on religiously-aware dress choices?

While the major scholarly and political focus has recently been on the relations between Islam and fashion, especially in terms of veiling, people with other religious affiliations must also make choices regarding fashion and dress issues. Papers focusing on any religion and belief system, and on any geographical (and/or virtual) location, are welcomed for this special edition. Articles comparing different religious and/or sectarian groups are also invited. 

Contributions are sought from diverse disciplinary and inter-disciplinary backgrounds across the social sciences and humanities. Papers which report novel empirical findings, and innovate in theoretical and methodological terms, are particularly encouraged.

Special issue website with submission instructions: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/fashion

Submission deadline: 1 April 2019

Queries: Anna-Mari Almila a.almila@fashion.arts.ac.uk

Keywords: fashion, clothes, dress, religion, faith, beliefs, globalization

 

Dr Anna-Mari Almila
Research Fellow in Sociology of Fashion

NEW BOOK: https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-International-Handbook-to-Veils-and-Veiling/Almila-Inglis/p/book/9781472455369

London College of Fashion
University of the Arts London
20 John Prince’s Street
London W1G 0BJ

a.almila@fashion.arts.ac.uk

http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/ual-staff-researchers/a-z/dr-anna-mari-almila/

CFP: The Faith Lives of Women and Girls:

Conference: “The Faith Lives of Women and Girls: Identities, Experiences, Practices, and Beliefs

26- 27 March 2019
Queen’s Foundation, Birmingham

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

  • Dr Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor,  Centre for Trust, Peace, and Social Relations, Coventry University
  • Prof. Chia Longman, Director of the Centre for Research on Culture and Gender, University of Gent
  • Dr Yafa Shanneik, University of Birmingham
  • Prof. Nicola Slee, Queen’s Foundation (Birmingham) and Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

This two day conference explores the diverse faith lives, identities, experiences, practices, and beliefs of self-identifying girls and women, in their individual, community, and institutional contexts. The conference welcomes

  • postgraduate
  • early-career
  • academic researchers
  • grassroots practitioners

The conference examines gender and feminism in religions, spiritualities, and theologies. The event is grounded in qualitative and quantitative approaches and also addresses the methodological questions that arise when researchers consider contemporary female faith.

We welcome 200 – 300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers from a range of disciplines and religious and spiritual traditions, and emerging themes in non-religion. We are very open to broad range of topics and issues. Alternative formats, panel proposals, and posters are also encouraged.

The conference is committed to ensuring an inclusive environment for discussion and the dissemination of work.

Please submit your abstract as a word document and include your name, affiliation, title of paper, and email address, and send to both the following email addresses:

Deadline for submission: *14 December 2018*

CFP: Conference on Leadership, Authority and Representation in British Muslim Communities

This one-day conference brings together academics and activists to explore issues of leadership, authority and representation in British Muslim communities.  Who speaks for British Muslims?  How is authority construed, constructed and exercised in an age of mass media and the Internet?  What internal and external factors shape leadership structures and modalities of representation for British Muslims living as a minority in a culturally Christian but largely secular social context?  Where do leaders come from in a decentralised religious tradition lacking a priestly hierarchy?  How do government discourses and media representations impact upon dynamics of leadership and authority in British Muslim communities?

  • Keynote Lectures by:
  • Ataullah Siddiqui (Markfield Institute of Higher Education)
  • Shaukat Warraich (Faith Associates)

Panel Discussion on ‘The Future Role of Imams in the UK’ with:

  • Saleem Kidwai (Chair)
  • Shuruq Naguib
  • Atif Imtiaz
  • Mufti Abdur Rahman Mangera
  • Myriam Francois-Cerrah
  • Imam Qari Asim

This conference has been organised in conjunction with a special issue of the international journal Religions jointly edited by Professor Sophie Gilliat-Ray and Dr Riyaz Timol.  Delegates may be invited to submit a paper for publication, subject to normal peer-review procedures, after the event.  The deadline for final paper submissions is 25 April 2019.

Call for Papers: (EASR) “Religion – Continuations and Disruptions”

17th Annual Conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions

Religions are works in progress. New ideas, doctrines and practices have appeared time and again and often spread across cultural and confessional boundaries. Some of the changes have been intentional, introduced by powerful individuals and institutions, others have emerged more spontaneously as vernacular reactions to innovations imposed from ‘above’.  Some elements in religions have persisted for centuries, some have disappeared and some reappeared in completely new forms or acquired new meanings. Similar processes can be observed around us in contemporary societies as well.

Yet, oftentimes scholars of religion have struggled with studying such constantly changing and transforming phenomena. This leads us to ask how many disruptions or interruptions can a tradition adapt or even embrace, while still maintaining its identity. At the same time studying change (or the lack thereof) arises several conceptual and methodological problems. First of all, how does one conceptualize change without implying a static research object? This is also a problem of evaluation and rhetorical power – who has the authority to claim that something is extinct or that a new tradition has been established? What is the scholar’s responsibility for the field of studies? When and to what extent do scholars have to take into account the views of insiders in reflecting upon religious traditions or in drawing boundaries between them?

Aside from ‘conventional’ religion and religiosity, considering various ‘spiritualities’ and the rise of the numbers of people with no clear religious affiliation, how does one study a phenomenon which has lost its visibility or moved into the private sphere?  Or how does one make sense of the continuities and disruptions in a world where more and more people simultaneously participate in several traditions, either religious or secular?

The conference will focus on these and related questions, examining religious traditions worldwide. In addition, it calls for reflecting upon continuities and disruptions in the history of religious studies. Our conceptual tools, theoretical frameworks, methodologies and even the category of religion have been changing. Is it necessary to strive for unity in the discipline or rather celebrate the pluralism in the study of religions? And how to depict change, so that the complicated dynamic of religious transformation is also reflected through the conceptual tools we use?

See details at https://easr2019.org/