CALL FOR Papers: Religious Practices and the Internet

RESET:

  • recherches en sciences sociales sur internet
  • social scienceresearch on the internet

reset@openedition.org
http://reset.revues.org
ISSN 4939–0247

CALL FOR Papers

Religious Practices and the Internet

Deadline for abstract submissions: SEPTEMBER 7th, 2018

Special issue edited by Fabienne Duteil-Ogata (Clare EA4596, Université Bordeaux-Montaigne / IIAC [EHESS/CNRS]) and Isabelle Jonveaux (CéSor, EHESS)

In the past few years, when tragic events have been associated with religious radicalization, the Internet has been often pointed out. For instance, for fundamentalist groups such as Daesh or Al Qaida, digital social networks may be an opportunity to recruit people beyond geographical borders (Udrescu 2013, Torok 2010, 2011). Nevertheless, behind such specific and highly mediatized cases, it must not be forgotten that the Internet’s uses have grown in almost any religious group, to become today something as common as unavoidable (Dawson & Cowan, 2004, Knoblauch, 2009, Campbell, 2010, Cheong et al., 2012, Jonveaux, 2013).

This special issue precisely aims at exploring how the Internet affects religion or conversely, how religion can transform digital media. These questions may be discussed at least from two standpoints. On the one hand, one can consider that religions have always used media and that there is in fact no religion without media (Krotz, 2007). This theory relies on the conceptualization of religions as communication systems. The use of digital media by religious institutions is consequently unsurprising, because throughout history and often very fast, they have invested the major communication developments, such as the printing press in the Middle Age (Eisenstein, 2005 [1983]) or telephone and then television since the end of the 19th century (Sastre Santos, 1997). In this perspective, digital media has brought nothing really new to religions and what is observed online is nothing but an extension or the reflection of the current trends related to religious matters and its modernity (Jonveaux, 2013). On the other hand, the opposite position considers that new media transform both religions’ contents and practices (Hjarvard, 2013). They lead precisely to the creation of new religious forms or “cyberreligions” (Hojsgaard, 2005) in which religious institutions as well as religious practices exist only online, like in the case The Church of the Blind Chihuahua or the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster for example, even though some of these religions have clearly a parodic dimension (Obadia, 2015). In this perspective, the Internet can be seen as a tool that has carried something original and exclusive to the practice of religions, far from only reproducing online offline practices.

To go beyond these seemingly antithetical approaches, a solution may be to go back to the classic categories of the sociology of religion and ask how much the Internet has (or not) transformed them. Simultaneously, this implies to lead empirical studies dedicated to the description of religions as lived by online users or to the religious institutions which observe and integrate digital uses to a certain extent. For this special issue, we have therefore identified at least four research directions (detailed below) in which potential contributors could inscribe their article proposals.

Areas of research/submissions  (please write the editors for details)

  1. Rituals, Worship, Prayers and Celebrations

  2. Identities, Belongings, Avatars and Communities

  3. Asceticism, Fasting and Prohibitions

  4. Conversion, Education and Transmission

Calendar and practical information

The abstracts (500 words maximum) are due by September 7th, 2018. They should be sent to the following address: reset@openedition.org.

Proposals may be written either in English or in French, and should state the research question, the methodology, and the theoretical framework. They will focus on the scientific relevance of the proposed article in light of the existing literature and the call for papers, and may be accompanied by a short bibliography. We also would like to draw the authors’ attention to a special section in the journal called “Revisiting the Classics”, devoted to new readings of classical authors and theories in the context of digital media: for this special issue, papers centered on the re-exploration of classical authors and categories from the social sciences of religion will be particularly appreciated.

The abstracts will be reviewed anonymously by the issue editors and the members of the journal editorial board. Authors of submissions selected at this stage will be asked to e-mail their full papers by November 12th, 2018 for another double-blind peer review evaluation.

The journal RESET also accepts submissions for its “Varia” section, open to scholarly works in the Humanities and Social Sciences dealing with Internet-related objects or methods of research.

Calendar :

Deadline for abstract submission (500 words maximum, plus references): September 7th, 2018.

Responses to authors: September 20th, 2018.

Deadline for full papers (6 000 to 10 000 words, plus references): November 12th, 2018.

Contact:

Editorial board reset@openedition.org

Coordinators:

fabienne.duteil-ogata@u-bordeaux-montaigne.fr

isabellejonveaux@yahoo.fr

Conference / Call for Papers: Formatting Nonreligion in Late Modern Societies – Institutional and Legal Perspectives

26-27 sept. 2018 Oslo (Norway)

The conference is jointly organised by the research project Good Protestant, Bad Religion? Formatting Religion in Modern Society (GOBA) at the University of Oslo and the Eurel project.

Conference deadlines:

  • submission of abstracts 28 February 2018
  • notification of results 31 March 2018
  • Conference 26-27 September 2018

* * * *

Formatting Non-religion in Late Modern Society – Institutional and Legal Perspectives invites scholars across disciplines to address the conceptualisation and knowledge of nonreligion in the late modern society. The starting point of the conference is that nonreligion is a culturally contingent concept that displays sociocultural variations across different geographical regions and socio-political systems. With an increasing nonreligious population, the maps of religious belonging needs to be reconfigured, which also could impact how both religious and nonreligious affiliations are recognised by the state. 

The conference features keynote speeches by Professors Lori Beaman (University of Ottawa) and Lois Lee(University of Kent).

The conference invites papers with approaches based in political science, sociology, and law. Sociological approaches can draw on both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Papers will address any of the following questions: 

  • How can nonreligion be defined, and how can the “nones” be grasped and taken into account in studies on religion?
  • How does the sociocultural and religious backdrop of different countries affect the regulation and representation of nonreligion in law and policymaking?
  • Where and how do nonreligious individuals and collectives fit into institutions in contemporary societies?
  • In which ways do services developed to satisfy the existential needs of citizens provided by the state through law and politics (“from above”) – recognise worldviews and sentiments that are something other than religious? How can nonreligious beliefs be addressed by the law?
  • How does nonreligion “from above” affect notions of citizenship and national belonging? 

Paper proposals of no more than 300 words can be submitted here by February 28th, 2018. Proposals must specify which conference theme the paper addresses, and indicate the author’s contact information and institutional affiliation.

The Eurel prize will be awarded at the 2018 conference. It is open to PhD students and young researchers (less than 3 years after defence of the doctorate). Specify in your proposal if you are in such a situation.

Authors will be notified by March 31st 2018 if their proposal has been accepted. The organizers will cover accommodation for one night and all meals for presenters. Transportation fees will not be taken in charge.

Papers must be presented in English or French, normally no more than 20 minutes. If possible, the presentation documents will be in the language not used for the presentation. Although not not mandatory for participation, this would be appreciated.

Scientific Committee: Helge Årsheim (Norway), Erlend From (Norway), Sylvie Toscer-Angot (France), Michał Zawiślak (Poland), Anne-Laure Zwilling (France).

https://non-religion.sciencesconf.org/.

Conference Announcement / Call for Papers: Ecclesiology and Ethnography Conference 2018

START: September 11, 2018 – 11:00 am

END: September 13, 2018 – 1:30 pm

ADDRESS: St John’s College, 3 South Bailey, DH1 3RJ   VIEW MAP

This is the annual conference for the network bringing together scholars working on ethnographic approaches to ecclesiology.

It is is a wide ranging conference, and part of the joy is discovering a diversity of specialisms and learning.  Past papers have included ethnography, anthropology, systematic theology, ecclesiology, practical theology and social science approaches.  Attendees range from professors to local ministers and this is an excellent place to present as a post graduate or early career researcher, or as a pastor/scholar in ministry.  Learning is generously shared and critiques are supportive.  We encourage single and multi-authored papers.  All papers are to be circulated prior to the event to enhance conference conversations and interaction. Established scholars, doctoral students as well as pastor/scholars working in church settings are welcome to propose papers.

If you are interested in proposing a paper, please click here to find more information and a proposal form.

The Conference is run in association with The Department of Theology and Religion and St John’s College, Durham University and is based in St John’s College, in the centre of historic Durham. Our meals and accommodation will also be within the college. There will be the usual folk music evening on 12th September.  A limited number of en-suite rooms are available, allocated on a first come, first served basis.  Please email avril.c.baigent@durham.ac.uk with any dietary restrictions that you may have. If you require an additional night of accommodation, please email Sue Hobson at the college directly at s.l.hobson@durham.ac.uk. Please also let Sue know if you will be arriving later in the evening.  St John’s College is about a fifteen minute walk from Durham Rail Station. From Newcastle airport you can ride the Metro to Newcastle Central Station, where you can find frequent trains to Durham. Otherwise, you can book a car with Airport Express to take you from the airport directly to St John’s College.

Booking is now open: please click here to register.

Click HERE to see a conference timetable.

Conference Call for Papers Conference: ‘Religion Matters’

Conference: ‘Religion Matters’: Celebrating the Work of Professor Peter Lineham

Dates: Monday 3 and Tuesday 4 December 2018
Location: Massey University (Albany Campus)

At the end of 2018 Professor Peter Lineham will ‘retire’ after a lifetime of service and employment as an historian at Massey University. Over that time Peter has made exceptional contributions on many fronts, perhaps most notably through enriching scholarly and public understanding of religion and the history of Aotearoa New Zealand. In this respect, his many writings, conference papers, radio and TV interviews, and his influence on countless students and thesis writers all bear testimony to a remarkable impact and legacy. Peter is best known as an historian of religion. Yet his work has always been characterised by an extraordinary range – addressing diverse traditions, historical and contemporary concerns, and issues extending from print culture to politics, sectarianism to sport, and welfare to demographic change. A consistent thread has been to examine, through bold arguments and in more intimate detail, how and why ‘religion matters’; and to tease out the interwoven dimensions of religion, society and culture, whether in Aotearoa New Zealand, our region, or in a wider global perspective. Peter has also consistently sought to provoke curiosity and spark healthy debate, typically with a splash of sparkle and fun.

‘Religion Matters’ seeks to honour Peter and his contributions through a dedicated conference, exploring this theme in the context of New Zealand and further afield. This two-day event will be based at Massey University’s Albany campus. It will combine lively academic examinations of the ‘Religion Matters’ theme, a celebration dinner, and opportunity for colleagues and connections of Peter to interact together and with him.

The keynote speaker is Dr Meredith Lake, author of the recently-published and already acclaimed volume The Bible in Australia: A Cultural History (New South Books, 2018); see further https://www.meredithlake.com/meet-meredith . Professor Michael Belgrave and the Rev. Dr Allan Davidson will directly address Peter’s academic career and public contribution. Peter will also have a right of reply.

Therefore, we invite offers of papers from historians and others that address the conference theme, ‘Religion Matters’, in relation to New Zealand or other contexts. In keeping with Peter’s wide interests, we anticipate that papers will cover a range of relevant approaches and issues, including critique of the conference theme.

Paper proposals should be sent by email to Dr Hugh Morrison (hugh.morrison@otago.ac.nz ) in the form of a 200 word (maximum) abstract, with a paragraph outlining academic or professional background.

All proposals need to be received by Friday 10 August, 2018. Accepted papers will be notified by Friday 7 September.

Sponsored by the Religious History Association of Aotearoa New Zealand and the School of Humanities, Massey University

Call for Papers & Sessions: AASR and NZASR joint Conference 2018

Australian Association for the Study of Religion and the New Zealand Association for the Study of Religion

November 29, 2018 – November 30, 2018
at: University of Auckland – visit site: http://www.nzasr.ac.nz/conference/index.php/annual/2018

Theme:  Ngā Wāhi Tapu/Sacred Place: Continuity and Change

Due date for proposals: July 15, 2018

The third Joint Conference of the New Zealand Association for the Study of Religions (NZASR) and the Australian Association for the Study of Religions (AASR) will be hosted by the University of Auckland 29-30 November 2018. The plenary sessions of the conference this year will be held in the Waipapa Marae and the Maclaurin Chapel, two sacred sites on the University of Auckland campus, which reveal both continuity and change in this particular context.

The study of sacred place has been receiving renewed attention in the interdisciplinary study of religion. It includes a consideration of familiar institutions—temples, shrines, and churches—but also extends to less visible sites that ground everyday life in ritual practices in the home or in public spaces that are outside the boundaries of “official” religion. In spite of the evidence for secularization, the renewal and revitalization of sacred places is occurring in contemporary societies and transforming many urban areas such as Auckland, Sydney, and Melbourne. This is due in part to recent patterns of immigration and the growth in religious diversity with the arrival of new religious traditions and the flourishing of diaspora communities. The movement of peoples and the increase in interreligious encounters is creating a dynamic situation of mutual transformation and contributing to both de/re-territorialization of religion as some sacred sites are appropriated by new actors and groups representing alternatives to established religious institutions.

Paper and panel proposals are invited to address a number of questions and issues surrounding the conference theme. How do demographic trends—both domestic and international migration—impact the religious landscape? How is sacred place being represented materially in new ways? What consequences do these new expressions of the sacred have for shaping human values and civil society? How is gender and sexuality regulated in these places? What role do governments play in the protection of traditional sacred sites and in the construction of new ones? Papers addressing these concerns and their relevance for the academic study of religion in the Antipodes are particularly welcome. In addition to proposals related to the conference theme, we also invite submissions on the full range of topics and issues that reflect the diverse fields of specialization, disciplinary approaches, and research interests of our members.

The programme this year will include several keynotes and plenary sessions. Associate Professor Cristina Rocha (Western Sydney University) will give the AASR Presidential Address and Associate Professor Jay Johnston will give the Penny Magee lecture. The NZASR keynote and plenary session will be announced shortly.

Guidelines for Paper and Panel Proposals:

  • Paper proposals should be submitted online at the link below and include the following information: Title, Author, Abstract (maximum 200 words), and University affiliation.
  • For panel proposals, the convener should submit one document that includes the abstracts and author information of each presenter, here: http://www.nzasr.ac.nz/conference/index.php/annual/2018/schedConf/cfp

Bursaries:

The AASR will be offering 6 bursaries of AUD $500 each for postgraduate students to attend the Auckland conference. We invite students to submit abstracts and their CVs by 30 of August in order to apply for these bursaries. Please email A/Professor Cristina Rocha (Western Sydney University / President, AASR): C.Rocha@westernsydney.edu.au

Key information and dates to remember:

  • Deadline for paper proposals: April 4, 2018 – July 15, 2018.
  • An early-bird registration rate (NZ$250) is available to members who register on or before 30 September 2018.
  • An early-bird registration rate (NZ$125) is available to students or other unwaged attendees who register on or before 30 September 2018.
  • The NZASR site will be updated in July with a link to the University of Auckland’s Events Centre, which will manage conference registration and payment, and provide information on accommodations, including both nearby hotels and on-campus options.
  • Principal Conference Contact: Professor Mark Mullins (University of Auckland): m.mullins@auckland.ac.nz

Call for papers for a special edition of the Journal of Beliefs and Values

Special Issue:  Critical Issues and Research in Religious Literacy

Guest Editor: Prof. Adam Dinham, Goldsmiths University, London.

Religious Education in schools evokes mixed memories – and feelings – for  most in those countries where it exists. Where it does not, it can be mystifying that schools might have anything to do with religion or belief. Yet migration and globalisation mean daily encounter with increasing diversity, whatever our own religion, belief or none. How we teach, and learn, about religion is a critical part of how we respond religion, often framing our capability to do so.

This special issue focuses upon how we teach and learn about religion and belief across sectors of society – in schools, universities, professional training, workplace learning, and informal, community and citizen settings, as well as a range of international perspectives – through the lens of religious literacy. Papers are particularly invited which engage with any of the following domains and themes:

  • school RE
  • religion and belief in Higher Education
  • engaging with religion and belief identity in the public professions: social work, nursing, counselling, medicine, policing, prison service, armed forces, civil service and others
  • citizenship and lifelong learning about religion and belief
  • communities of learning about religion and belief
  • comparative – especially international – approaches
  • methodological issues and historical perspectives in religious literacy
  • pedagogies of religious literacy
  • definitions and measures of religious literacy

The deadline for papers is 28 February 2019. Publication will be in early 2020. Papers should be submitted according to the journal style guide and will be peer-reviewed according to the journal’s policy.  Further instructions for submitting can be found here

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=cjbv20&page=instructions

Please submit via the Editorial Manager online submission system, indicating that you wish your submission to be considered for this special issue.

http://www.edmgr.com/cjbv/default.aspx

very best wishes

Adam 

Professor Adam Dinham | Director, Faiths & Civil Society Unit |

Goldsmiths, University of London | New Cross, London, SE14 6NW | UK

www.gold.ac.uk/faithsunit | www.religiousliteracy.org | @RelLitProg

Call for Papers: Following ‘The Way’: Historicizing the Interspace among Indic Religions

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1khH0NJ2Qi9vgHmRnnoSb11mRtswcd03Q


Panth, matam, dharm, rah, and ṣirāṭ, meaning ‘The Way’, are some of the terms used by faith communities in South Asia to define their tradition’s path. This conference will explore how these ways were expressed in ritual, belief, and praxis to create distinction. For example, among the 19th century Khōjā of Sindh and Gujarat, the term satpanth ‘The True Way’, referred to numerous vernacular religious practices that incorporated Vaiṣṇav, Svāminārāyaṇ, Jain, Shia, and Sunni practices within a caste faith. Their liturgical materials originally were written in a caste script in a mélange of dialects from Sindhi, Gujarati, Kacchi, Rajasthani, and Urdu. This liminality was not exclusive to the north, in Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka araputamiḻ, the Muslim dialect of Tamil in the Arabic script, records the cosmologies and worldview of Muslim merchant communities that intersperses Vaishnava imagery with Arabic vocabulary.
This conference is intended to bring together scholars of the Adivasi, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Sikhism, and Zoroastrianism to explore how aesthetics, authority, narratives, rituals, and script have been historically shared and divided by faith communities in South Asia. How do we make sense of such heterogeneity that was distant from ‘orthodox’ literature being produced in urbane Sanskrit and Persian? How did rural religion differ and connect to larger faith communities across linguistic and script divides? Where were ethno-religious boundaries drawn between pragmatic mobile merchant communities and how fluid were they until early colonization? South Asian vernacular religion in local languages is a large untapped historical archive from which scholars can produce incisive microhistories. This is an open call for scholars across disciplines who wish to engage with the themes of endangered/extinct languages and scripts, merchant religion, modern religious identity formation, and the transmission of sacred narratives across the Persianate, Turkic, and Indic worlds.
The conference will be held at the University of Mumbai, Mumbai, January 30-31, 2019. The deadline for the submission of paper proposal is July 31, 2018. Successful applicants will be notified by August 30, 2018. The travel allowances ($500) as well as accommodation and board will be covered through the ‘Khoja Studies Conference’. Send your abstracts to: khojastudies@world-federation.org.

http://www.khojastudies.org

Publishing Opportunity: Handbook of Religion and Migration

Religion and Migration has become an important area of study, yet remains diverse.  Research in this area has expanded as audiences become more interested in the topic.  Transnational migration calls into question the relationship of religion in the diaspora.  Religious identities are changing in the face of pluralism and multiculturalism. This volume will examine universalist ideas of religion, as well as constructed ideas of religion, in the global world.

We are currently seeking papers for a peer-reviewed edited volume, The Bloomsbury Handbook of Religion and Migration, to be published by Bloomsbury Press in their Handbooks in Religion Series and edited by Rubina Ramji (ruby_ramji@cbu.ca) and Alison Marshall (marshalla@brandonu.ca).

The volume will provide a broad geographic representation with a focus on the present-day immigration issues. The aim of this interdisciplinary collection is to provide a scholarly introduction to a variety of audiences. We are looking for in-depth introductory essays chronicling migration in regional and transnational contexts, as well as dominant and emerging theories and approaches to the study of religious identities in a global context.  Overall, the volume is aimed at scholars and students who seek entry points in the range of critical issues and themes related to religion and migration.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • A survey of religious groups that have migrated
  • The negotiation of religion in the diaspora
  • The “religionization” of political, cultural, ethnic and gender identity in the diaspora
  • The rise of anti-immigration stances in the face of religious extremism and terrorism
  • The rise of religious intolerance towards religious minorities
  • The suppression of religious freedoms in secular societies
  • Religious integration versus religious assimilation of religious minorities
  • The transformation of religious identities across social/geographic boundaries

Full submissions may range from 5,000–10,000 words depending on topic.

Proposals

Please send a proposal (300-500 words), an abstract (100 words), anticipated word count, and CV to Rubina Ramji and Alison Marshall at  RelMigration@gmail.com. Feel free to direct any questions to the editors before submission.

Extended Proposal Deadline:  July 15, 2018

Full Draft Submissions of Complete Papers Due: January 1, 2019

Call for Papers: “CURRENTS, PERSPECTIVES, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODOLOGIES FOR WORLD CHRISTIANITY”

An International, Interdisciplinary Conference organized by The World Christianity & History of Religions Program (Dept. of History & Ecumenics)
Princeton, New Jersey, USA

Description
Recent decades mark a watershed in World Christianity as an emerging academic field, its development into an interdisciplinary endeavor in particular. Reflection on the complexity of Christianity as a pluricultural, global phenomenon has been robust. As was highlighted by our 2018 conference, World Christianity as a field has been shaped in large part by its distinctive historiography and diverse methodologies. In 2019, our primary focus will be ethnographic. Accordingly, a wide range of questions about the nature and relevance of ethnography to the study of World Christianity will be explored, along with the difference ethnography makes (or could make) in providing granular accounts of local Christianities around the world. Likewise, in view of the fact that ethnographic research is being increasingly incorporated into studies of World Christianity at a time when concepts of ‘culture’ are rigorously contested and the loci of research extraordinarily diverse, what are the major challenges scholars face? The conference seeks to explore and reflect on past practices and new directions, drawing on case studies representative of the currents and eddies of Christianity in the majority world and beyond. In short, the conference seeks to inquire into the state of the field and provide a common interdisciplinary space for intellectual encounter and exchange.

  • Paper or panel proposals should be submitted via email to: worldchristianityconference@ptsem.edu
  • Proposal Deadline: September 30, 2018. Include: name, institutional affiliation and status, email address, contact phone, paper/panel title, and abstract (not to exceed 250 words).
  • Notification of successful proposals will be made by October 20, 2018.
  • Conference Registration: early-bird registration begins on October 25and ends on December 31. A higher fee will be charged thereafter.
  • Conference fees: (including refreshments, lunches, and the conference banquet)
    • $155.00 – early bird / $185.00 – late registration (faculty based in USA, Canada and Europe)
    • $100.00 – early bird / $120.00 – late registration (faculty based in the Global South, graduate students/retirees)
    • Accommodations: Limited availability (single/shared rooms) at Erdman Center on the Princeton Seminary campus. Other options for accommodation will be announced later.
  • Limited travel subsidies will be available for selected participants from the Global South with accepted paper/panel proposals.

Conveners: Afe Adogame, Raimundo Barreto, Richard F. Young

Call for Papers: “CURRENTS, PERSPECTIVES, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODOLOGIES FOR WORLD CHRISTIANITY”

An International, Interdisciplinary Conference organized by The World Christianity & History of Religions Program (Dept. of History & Ecumenics)
Princeton, New Jersey, USA

Description
Recent decades mark a watershed in World Christianity as an emerging academic field, its development into an interdisciplinary endeavor in particular. Reflection on the complexity of Christianity as a pluricultural, global phenomenon has been robust. As was highlighted by our 2018 conference, World Christianity as a field has been shaped in large part by its distinctive historiography and diverse methodologies. In 2019, our primary focus will be ethnographic. Accordingly, a wide range of questions about the nature and relevance of ethnography to the study of World Christianity will be explored, along with the difference ethnography makes (or could make) in providing granular accounts of local Christianities around the world. Likewise, in view of the fact that ethnographic research is being increasingly incorporated into studies of World Christianity at a time when concepts of ‘culture’ are rigorously contested and the loci of research extraordinarily diverse, what are the major challenges scholars face? The conference seeks to explore and reflect on past practices and new directions, drawing on case studies representative of the currents and eddies of Christianity in the majority world and beyond. In short, the conference seeks to inquire into the state of the field and provide a common interdisciplinary space for intellectual encounter and exchange.

  • Paper or panel proposals should be submitted via email to: worldchristianityconference@ptsem.edu
  • Proposal Deadline: September 30, 2018. Include: name, institutional affiliation and status, email address, contact phone, paper/panel title, and abstract (not to exceed 250 words).
  • Notification of successful proposals will be made by October 20, 2018.
  • Conference Registration: early-bird registration begins on October 25and ends on December 31. A higher fee will be charged thereafter.
  • Conference fees: (including refreshments, lunches, and the conference banquet)
    • $155.00 – early bird / $185.00 – late registration (faculty based in USA, Canada and Europe)
    • $100.00 – early bird / $120.00 – late registration (faculty based in the Global South, graduate students/retirees)
    • Accommodations: Limited availability (single/shared rooms) at Erdman Center on the Princeton Seminary campus. Other options for accommodation will be announced later.
  • Limited travel subsidies will be available for selected participants from the Global South with accepted paper/panel proposals.

Conveners: Afe Adogame, Raimundo Barreto, Richard F. Young