Call for Papers: Worldviews in creating meaning and purpose for learning

The sixth biennial conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction EARLI, Special Interest Group 19: Religious and Spiritual Education provides an international academic forum for presenting and discussing latest research findings on religious and spiritual education taking place in different societal and educational settings and across age groups. The EARLI SIG 19 is addressing both junior and senior scholars to present their work.

The topic of the conference discusses how worldviews impact people’s motivation to learn, how worldviews guide people’s life choices and future orientation, and how worldviews and religions help people to find meaning and purpose in life.

The conference includes keynote addresses from Professor Alyssa Bryant Rockenbach (North Carolina State University, USA), Associate Professor Jenny Berglund (Södertörn University, Sweden), Professor Kirsi Tirri (University of Helsinki, Finland) and Professor Ulrich Riegel (University of Siegen, Germany).

For submissions you will need to prepare:
An abstract of 200-250 words maximum (excluding references) submission by January 31st, informing about:
– Mention your preference for a paper or a poster presentation, or a particular roundtable session.
– Include your research questions and objectives,
– Theoretical framework and the referred literature,
– Research design (research approach, methods and tools for collecting and analyzing data) for empirical research or data sources, evidences and materials for others research projects,
– Findings of the study.

Proposal submission via conference website by January 31, 2018
http://www.uef.fi/en/web/sig19conference2018/submissions

Repostings from the AASR: Calls for Papers, Book Announcements, and Job Openings.

Here are the latest event, book, and job announcements from the newsletter of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Click the links or visit https://www.aasr.org.au/january-2018/ for information.

Call for Papers

Islamic Ethics and the Trusteeship Paradigm: Interdisciplinary Explorations

Religious Marriages in the Mediterranean Conference 20-21st March 2018

Religion Area for the 9th Annual International Conference of the Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand July 2-4, 2018

Disputing Religion and Politics Research: How Western/Eurocentric is its Agenda? Hamburg 24-26 August 2018

Populist politics and the minority voice: British Muslims, extremisms and inclusion 19 April 2018

Multiple Religious Identities – Individuals, Communities, Traditions
16th Annual Conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR) / IAHR Regional Conference, Bern 2018

Religions and Identities in the European Migration Crisis – Abstract deadline: January, 31

Post-global Religion, EASR conference 17-21 June in Bern

Academic Publications

Siddiqi, Bulbul (2018) Becoming ‘Good Muslim’: The Tablighi Jamaat in the UK and Bangladesh, Springer

Chakrabarti, Anindita (2018) Faith and Social Movements: Religious Reform in Contemporary India, published by Cambridge University Press

Knut A. Jacobsen (2018) Yoga in Modern Hinduism: Hariharānanda Āraṇya and Sāṃkhyayoga, Routeldge

Foroutan, Y. (2017), Muslim Minority of New Zealand in Global Context: Demographic Perspective, Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, 37 (4): 511-519.

Račius, Egdūnas (2018) Muslims in Eastern Europe, Edinburgh University Press

Academic Positions

Four Ph.D. research fellowships available at MF-Norwegian    School of Theology

Two vacancies as postdoc at MF-Norwegian School of Theology, with effect from 1st of September 2018

(Thanks to Dr Milad Milani)

Call for Papers for the Panel On Religion and Politics: Post- and Decolonial Interventions

ECPR General Conference, Hamburg 24-26 August 2018

Section: Revisiting Religion and Politics Research: Achievements, Critique, Future Questions

Panel Chair: Zubair Ahmad, BGSMCS, Freie Universität Berlin (zubair@zedat.fuberlin.de)

Discussant: N.N.
Deadline: 4th February, 2018 Panel Description

Postcolonial and Decolonial analyses have developed an extensive and valuable body of scholarship. In doing so, they have problematized and critiqued the Eurocentric formation of colonial modernity, along with its forms of epistemic and sociopolitical violence, its contradictions, and contingencies. Furthermore, they have altered analytical avenues in order to critically reevaluate the persistence of Eurocentric hegemonies (normative assumptions, epistemological structures, and power effects) accompanying and underpinning our present. Whereas these scholars have significantly shaped disciplines such as history, comparative literature, anthropology, or the study of religion, it is remarkable how their contributions remain marginal, if not absent, within the study of politics.

Against this backdrop, this panel seeks to provide a forum for critically engaging with postcolonial and decolonial scholarship. It does this by specifically turning toward the, by now, famous dyad of religion and politics. Departing from the premises that European colonization has been a “major, extended and ruptural world-historical event” (Stuart Hall), postcolonial and decolonial interrogations have long suggested convoluted histories of religion and politics. The epistemic, conceptual, and effective formation and history of religion and politics, as a dyad, these scholars suggest, has taken place in close proximity with Europe’s colonial endeavors – their reverberation and duress haunting our very present. From knowing and governing the colonized and (post-)colonial Other to ordering the colony, religion and politics have a longer history and much more complex presence than the liberal paradigm of investigation usually suggests, or forces upon our very inquiries. Engaging with the relationship of religion and politics since the 1970s and 1980s, subfields such as comparative politics or political theory have neglected these and other postcolonial/decolonial insights while keeping colonial epistemologies, divisions, questions, and orders in tact.

In order to address this troubling state-of-affairs within the study of politics, the panel invites contributions from decisively postcolonial or/and decolonial perspectives. The overall aim is twofold: Firstly, to evaluate and problematize the hegemonic, and therefore persistent, analytical avenues taken within a more mainstream engagement with religion and politics and, secondly, to broaden the scope of engagement, depth, and analysis by introducing postcolonial/decolonial questions, epistemologies, modes of investigation, and problematizations to an important and still ongoing debate.

Please submit your abstract (350-500 words) to Zubair Ahmad (zubair@zedat.fu-berlin.de) no later than 4th February.

Zubair Ahmad

Doctoral Fellow

Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies

Freie Universität Berlin

Altensteinstraße 48 | 14195 Berlin

Call for Papers: panel on “ Being religious, being scientific: the dynamics of science and religion in the laboratory ”

(Submitted by Joseph Satish, from the University of Hyderabad, India.)

I write to invite paper abstracts from members of the ISA Sociology of Religion Network, to our open panel, “ Being religious, being scientific: the dynamics of science and religion in the laboratory ” (Panel #30), at this year’s Annual Meeting of the  Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) in Sydney, 29 August – 1 September 2018.

In keeping with the theme of the conference “TRANSnational STS”, we invite contributions from scholars all over the world, who have explored questions related to the panel, from the perspectives of Science, Technology & Society Studies (STS), Religious Studies, Sociology and Anthropology of Religion, History of Science and related disciplines, across local, national and transnational units of analysis.

Abstract submissions (upto 250 words) to our panel can be made at the conference website via:  https://4s2018sydney.org/call-for-papers-open-panels/ . The abstract should contain the paper’s main arguments, methods, and contributions to STS and related disciplines. The deadline is February 1, 2018.

CALL FOR PAPERS: RELIGION AT THE ROYAL COMMISSION

JOURNAL FOR THE ACADEMIC STUDY OF RELIGION

SPECIAL ISSUE

VOL 31. NO 3

CALL FOR PAPERS

RELIGION AT THE ROYAL COMMISSION

Editor: Kathleen McPhillips, University of Newcastle

 The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse (2013-2017) has been internationally recognized as one of the most successful state inquiries into the culture of organizations and child safety and protection ever held. The Commission has amassed a huge repository of knowledge and research and the final report (December 2017) has made many recommendations that aim to increase the safety of children across organizations in Australian social life.

From the earliest days of Royal Commission public hearings, it became clear that religious organizations experienced the most difficulty with keeping children safe and addressing complaints. Research undertaken on behalf of the Royal Commission (Palmer et al 2017) and others (Keenan, 2012; Salter, 2017) indicates clearly that religious groups and particularly the Catholic and Anglican faiths were putting the reputation of their organizations ahead of child safety and protecting perpetrators rather than children. This is hugely problematic for such organizations that have a special claim on articulating moral authority and ethical standards. The full impact of this travesty is yet to be appreciated.

This special issue of JASR looks closely at the religious organizations that appeared before the Royal Commission, and the complex outcomes of child sexual abuse for survivors and organisations. In particular we encourage papers that address the following: mechanisms of organizational management and cultures of leadership; relevant theological discourses; the relationship between gender, religious organizations and child sexual abuse; evaluations of processes of organizational change; intersections between (secular) law and religion; and analysis of the impact of the Royal Commission findings on the authority and legitimacy of religious groups, particularly the Anglican and Catholic churches.

Abstracts of up to 200 words should be submitted no later than March 1st 2018 to the Editor of the Special Issue, Kathleen McPhillips (Kathleen.mcphillips@newcastle.edu.au).

Full papers are due July 1st 2018.

The Journal for the Academic Study of Religion is a highly regarded journal in the field of religious studies and is the leading journal in religion in the Pacific region: https://journals.equinoxpub.com/index.php/JASR

It has been in publication for 30 years and regularly publishes special issues.  The journal is committed to publishing cutting edge research from both new and established scholars, both in the Pacific region and internationally.

 

CFP:Conference of the International Research Training Group June 21-22 Rome 2018

Call for papers: Conference of the International Research Training Group “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Religion and Transnational Religious Discourses: Globality Construction and Resistance

Rome, June 21-22, 2018

Venue: German Historical Institute Rome, Via Aurelia Antica, 391

The International Research Training Group (IRTG) “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe” is based at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Charles University in Prague and Masaryk University in Brno. Cooperation partners are the Collegium Carolinum in Munich and the German Historical Institute in Rome.

The IRTG aims to contribute in a fundamental, both theoretically and methodologically innovative way to the analysis of the relationship between religion and modernity in Europe. Its research projects are interdisciplinary and international. Through joint methodology seminars and summer schools, it offers a study program that is carried out in Czech-German-Polish cooperation.

The conference deals with the ambivalent relationship between religion and globalization. The geographical distribution of religious communities has been used time and again to define supposedly immovable boundaries of civilization. Particular identities, such as local or national affiliations, are often backed by religious arguments and practices. At the same time, religion is one of the most important driving forces of transnational integration. Religion often claims universal validity and cross-border relationships are rather the rule than the exemption for religious communities. A religion contained within the boundaries of a single national state is an exception.

The conference poses the question of how religions and religious thinkers have responded to phenomena of globalization since the 19th century and how they have themselves been involved in the construction of transnational and global self-understanding. It focuses equally on the analysis of deliberate defense against cross-border influences, justified by a territorialized claim to validity of a particular “native” religious community, on the analysis of the area of tension between particularity and universality and the analysis of globalization strategies of religion, in confessional as well as in ecumenical contexts.

Organizers:

Martin Baumeister, Director of the German Historical Institute in Rome

Martin Schulze Wessel, Speaker of the IRTG “Religious cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Martina Niedhammer, Historical Seminar of LMU Munich

CFP:Conference of the International Research Training Group June 21-22 Rome 2018

Call for papers: Conference of the International Research Training Group “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Religion and Transnational Religious Discourses: Globality Construction and Resistance

Rome, June 21-22, 2018

Venue: German Historical Institute Rome, Via Aurelia Antica, 391

The International Research Training Group (IRTG) “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe” is based at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Charles University in Prague and Masaryk University in Brno. Cooperation partners are the Collegium Carolinum in Munich and the German Historical Institute in Rome.

The IRTG aims to contribute in a fundamental, both theoretically and methodologically innovative way to the analysis of the relationship between religion and modernity in Europe. Its research projects are interdisciplinary and international. Through joint methodology seminars and summer schools, it offers a study program that is carried out in Czech-German-Polish cooperation.

The conference deals with the ambivalent relationship between religion and globalization. The geographical distribution of religious communities has been used time and again to define supposedly immovable boundaries of civilization. Particular identities, such as local or national affiliations, are often backed by religious arguments and practices. At the same time, religion is one of the most important driving forces of transnational integration. Religion often claims universal validity and cross-border relationships are rather the rule than the exemption for religious communities. A religion contained within the boundaries of a single national state is an exception.

The conference poses the question of how religions and religious thinkers have responded to phenomena of globalization since the 19th century and how they have themselves been involved in the construction of transnational and global self-understanding. It focuses equally on the analysis of deliberate defense against cross-border influences, justified by a territorialized claim to validity of a particular “native” religious community, on the analysis of the area of tension between particularity and universality and the analysis of globalization strategies of religion, in confessional as well as in ecumenical contexts.

Organizers:

Martin Baumeister, Director of the German Historical Institute in Rome

Martin Schulze Wessel, Speaker of the IRTG “Religious cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Martina Niedhammer, Historical Seminar of LMU Munich

CFP: Joint Conference in Belfast, Sept 2018

Call for Papers

Joint Conference between the British Association for the Study of Religions and the Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions

3–5 September 2018, Queen’s University, Belfast

Held in Association with the Religious Studies Research Forum at the Institute of Theology and the School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics.

 Keynote Speakers:
Gladys Ganiel (Queen’s University, Belfast)
Naomi Goldenberg (University of Ottawa)

 Borders and boundaries define limits and margins, centres and peripheries. They demarcate territories, and separate entities and bodies and, as such, they function to guard space, limit action and exclude. They are, however, also contact zones and places of exchange, the ‘limen’ or threshold, the in-between, and the places of temptation and transgression. In the current political context when Ireland and the UK are faced with the dilemmas, paradoxes and implications of Brexit, this special joint conference of the Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions (ISASR) and the British Association for the Study of Religions (BASR) invites paper, research slam, panel and roundtable proposals on the theme of Borders and Boundaries. Scholars based outside the Republic of Ireland or the UK are invited to submit proposals related to this theme regardless of whether their work relates to these islands. Scholars who are based in the UK or the Republic of Ireland and are working on religion and related categories are welcome to submit proposals on any topic whether or not it relates to the conference theme.

Borders and boundaries of states, religions and identities have played a defining role in relations between Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, and Great Britain, perhaps most significantly the boundaries between religious communities. The negotiation between different religious lifeworlds, worldviews, constructs and dogmas takes place across perceived borders, whether real or imagined. Of concern amongst these for scholars of religions are the distinctions drawn between ‘religion’ and related categories, and between the ‘insider’ and ‘outsider’, which require the scholar to engage with the complexity of symbolic divides associated with identity, belief and belonging. In anthropological studies of religions, the crossing of borders or the ‘limen’ constitutes a transformational experience. Participation in ritual, pilgrimage and ecstatic practices often requires the crossing of thresholds between different states, between human and divine, human and animal, between different realms, of the living and the dead, material and spirit or otherworlds. Things that are normally kept separate, physically, conceptually and symbolically, meet at crossing points in the landscape, in ritual and in spiritual journeys.

These topics and more will provide the substantive content for this first-ever joint conference between these two member associations of the International Association for the History of Religions (IAHR).

Please note that papers should contribute to the aims of both societies, ISASR and BASR, specifically to advance research and education through the academic study of religions by providing a forum for the critical, analytical and cross-cultural study of religions, past and present. The conference will not be a forum for confessional, apologetical, interfaith or other similar concerns.

Proposals to be submitted to isasrbasr2018@gmail.com by 27 April 2018 (please include name, title, affiliation, and email address).

Paper Proposals: please submit title and abstract of 200 words.

Research Slam: A research “slam” is a quick succession of presentations of max. 7 minutes per presenter that gives a lively impression of a project, a programme, a network, or a collaboration the presenter is participating in. Please submit research slam proposals in the form of a title and brief (max. 150 words) abstract. It is possible to submit a research slam proposal as well as a paper proposal.

Panel proposals: please submit abstracts of 200 words for panel proposals. All panel proposals should include the name, title, affiliation, and email address of each presenter plus the chair and discussant (if applicable) plus abstracts for each of the papers on the panel.

Confirmation of acceptance on the conference programme will be sent by 15 June 2018. A small number of bursaries for postgraduate students and ECRs will be available.

See https://basr.ac.uk/ and/or https://isasr.wordpress.com/ for more information and updates.

Call for Proposals: “Religion and Politics: Conflict and Peace”

Religion and Politics – Conflict and Peace
13th International Conference of the SIEF Ethnology of Religion Working Group
Siena, September 20th-23rd, 2018

Politics and religion have never existed in isolation but always stood in continuous interaction throughout times. The “growing salience of religion on the world stage” (Hackett 2005:145) is to a great part due to the politization of religion in different contexts and dimensions: already in the early 2000s Grace Davie pointed to the European exceptionalism to the former persistent secularization thesis (cf. Berger 1967): “New arrivals”, especially Muslim Immigrants, challenged the image of the secular state. Right wing oriented, anti-Muslim political parties arose all over Europe as a reaction to the supposedly Muslimization of certain sectors of society. At the same time, orthodoxy was re-established in Putin´s Russia and conservative or contestative Roman Catholic movements address political developments all over the world. Nationalist Hinduism rose in India up to the election of a respective prime-minister. These various developments in political discourse also drew attention to the scientific study of religion. For the ethnography of religion it is a chance to broaden its objects of study and increase its public visibility.

While the aforementioned interactions between religion and politics gave way to conflicts on various levels, attention must also be paid to the “ambivalence of the sacred” (Appleby 2000): Reconciliation processes in South Africa and Northern Ireland for example have been informed by Christian ideas of peace. Other examples of political peacebuilding work can be found in Muslim or Buddhist discourse or the role of religions in the African-American emancipation movements.

Grasping the relationship of religion and politics in conflict and peace can also be framed in historical context. The conference invites papers that take up the context of fascism and racism with relation to religion in the year of the 80th anniversary of the Italian race-laws.

The 13th conference of the SIEF Ethnology of Religion Working Group aims to explore from ethnological / anthropological perspective the general theme of politics and religion in various national and political contexts, either in historical or contemporary times. Theoretical proposals and papers illustrating the productivity of ethnographic methods in research into the connection between religion and politics are especially welcome.

Possible subthemes of the conference are:

  • The role of religion in ongoing conflicts and peacebuilding initiatives
  • The politization of religion in discursive and historical dimensions
  • Grassroots movements and religious creativity under different political regimes
  • Sacred spaces, religious art, performances: objects, rituals, languages and practices in terms of religious and political tension.

Proposals can be sent to ethnorelsiena(at)unisi.it; the deadline for sending the proposals is January, 31st 2018.

Notification about acceptance will be sent before March, 31st 2018.

Conference fee: 90 EUR (also covers drinks and food at the welcome reception and snacks/brunch during coffee or lunch breaks).

The organizers are not able to support the participants financially. Participants are responsible for covering their own travel and accommodation expenses.

For more information: ethnorelsiena(at)unisi.it

International Conference on Universality v Particularity: Human Rights and Religions

Call for Papers

The Joint PhD Program on «Human Rights, Society, and Multi-Level Governance» offered by the University of Padova, University of Zagreb-Faculty of Law, University of Western Sydney, Panteion University of Athens, and the University of Nicosia

invites submissions for an international Conference on

Universality v Particularity: Human Rights and Religions

Nicosia, Cyprus

8-9th of June, 2018

The two-day conference will examine the aspects of the relationship between human rights and religions, universality and particularity, considering both the internal aspects of regulating human rights within a religious group, as well as the external aspects of regulating the interaction between religion and human rights on behalf of the state.

Religion is a salient aspect of a global public order. Extensive migration flows and the growth of religious plurality alongside with different levels of secularization have led to diverse models of relationship between human rights and religion. The particularity of ethnic and cultural diversities highlights the need for a re-evaluation of the traditional legal and socio-political thinking on religious freedom within the universality of human rights.

All these aspects will be considered through a multi- and interdisciplinary approach which encompasses law, sociology, philosophy, and political science. Participants are invited to address these issues and propose papers in line with the conference rationale, in relation to the following topics:

  1. 1. Universal human rights, domestic regimes, and dominant religions/ religious minorities
  2. 2. The religious effect on the states’ commitment to human rights
  3. 3. Religious freedom and ECtHR rulings
  4. 4. Religious freedom governance in domestic and international perspectives
  5. 5. Generational evolution of rights and the impact of religions
  6. 6. Political and legal secularisms and religious freedom
  7. 7. Regional negotiations of religious freedom practices
  8. 8. Religion and LGBT rights
  9. 9. Women inside and outside religions: human rights approaches
  10. 10. Grassroots society initiatives and religious freedom engagement
  11. 11. Global ethics and moral and cultural particularities
  12. 12. Religion, migration, and human rights
  13. 13. Human rights rhetorics within a religious tradition
  14. 14. Interreligious dialogue and human rights
  15. 15. Religion, human rights, and economic crisis

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Prof. Marco Ventura, University of Siena

Dr. Effie Fokas, Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Study (ELIAMEP)


Key Dates

January 15th, 2018 – Abstracts (400 words) should be sent to christodoulidou.e@unic.ac.cy

February 10th, 2018 – Notification of acceptance

There are no fees for attendance. Participants are, however, responsible for securing their own funding for travel and lodging.

Questions

Please direct inquiries in connection with this Conference to:

Prof. Achilles Emilianides: emilianides.a@unic.ac.cy