CFP: The Growth of Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism in the Global South and in Europe

SISR conference, Barcelona, 9-12 July 2019:

La croissance du philosémitisme chrétien et du sionisme chrétien dans les pays du Sud et en Europe

Thematic session / Session thématique

Convener(s):
Paul Freston
Wilfrid Laurier University
pfreston@wlu.ca
and
Manoela Carpenedo
University of Kent
M.Carpenedo@kent.ac.uk

Abstract (English):
Two closely-related but not identical phenomena have grown lately in the Christian world: Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism. Most growth has been among the evangelical and Pentecostal forms of Christianity mushrooming in much of the global south and which also play a growing role in otherwise struggling European Christianity. Philo-Semitism is “support or admiration for the Jewish people by non-Jews” (Rubinstein and Rubinstein). Christian Philo-Semitism can take many forms: a diffuse fascination with Jews and Israel; adoption of Jewish rituals and vestments, often associated with recovering the Jewish origins of Christianity; sometimes even adherence to laws of the Hebrew scriptures or cultivation of a presumed Jewish descent. Christian Zionism means geopolitical activism in favour of the state of Israel and its territorial expansion, including attempts to influence the foreign policy of one’s own nation-state. Christian Philo-Semitism and Christian Zionism appear to have diverse motivations, especially when straddling global north and south. While studies in the United States have been numerous, it has become increasingly obvious that these phenomena are much more widespread and diverse, and cannot be interpreted purely in American terms. To this end, we welcome proposals focusing on Christian Philo-Semitic or Christian Zionist attitudes and activities in the Global South and/or in Europe. Papers might address, although they are not limited to: analytical approaches; ethnographies and case studies; transformations in Christian Philo-Semitic religious identities; Christian Zionism, international relations and the geopolitics of faith.

Abstract (French):
Deux phénomènes liés mais non identiques se sont développés récemment dans le monde chrétien : le philosémitisme et le sionisme chrétien. La plus grande partie de leur croissance s’est déroulée au sein des formes évangéliques et pentecôtistes du christianisme qui se sont multipliées dans les pays du Sud et qui jouent également un rôle croissant dans le christianisme européen, par ailleurs en difficulté. Le philo-sémitisme est « un soutien ou une admiration pour le peuple juif par les non-juifs ». Le philo-sémitisme chrétien peut prendre plusieurs formes : une fascination pour les juifs et pour Israël ; l’adoption de rituels et vêtements juifs, souvent associés à la récupération des origines juives du christianisme ; parfois l’adhésion aux lois des écritures hébraïques ou la quête d’une descendance juive présumée. Le sionisme chrétien signifie un activisme géopolitique en faveur de l’État d’Israël et de son expansion territoriale. Le philo-sémitisme chrétien et le sionisme chrétien semblent avoir des motivations diverses, lorsqu’ils englobent les pays du Nord et du Sud. Bien que les études aux États-Unis aient été nombreuses, il est devenu de plus en plus évident que ces phénomènes sont beaucoup plus répandus et diversifiés et ne peuvent être interprétés uniquement en termes américains. Nous accueillons les propositions centrées sur les attitudes et activités philo-sémitiques chrétiennes ou sionistes chrétiennes dans les pays du Sud et/ou en Europe. Les articles peuvent aborder, bien qu’ils ne soient pas limités à : des approches analytiques ; des études de cas ; les transformations des identités religieuses chrétiennes philosémites ; Sionisme chrétien, relations internationales et géopolitique de la foi.

You can access the list of sessions here.

The call for papers will run until 16 December 2018.

You may propose a paper by using this link. Before doing that, have a look at the list of sessions, names of convener(s), and abstracts for each of the sessions, and decide to which one you would like to submit your paper.

The proposal (title and abstract up to 250 words) should be only in one language– English or French – in which you would like to present your paper.

Important:

You need to be an ISSR member, or renew your membership to submit a proposal, otherwise you will not be able to access the submission page (see Note on Membership, https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/sessions

CFP: “Gendering Jesus”

Special Issue of Religion and Gender

Guest editors Jamie Pitts (Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary, US) and Peter-Ben Smit (Free University Amsterdam/Utrecht University, the Netherlands) have just issued a call for papers for the Religion and Gender special issue entitled ‘Gendering Jesus’.

We invite you to review the call for papers at https://www.religionandgender.org/announcement/, or check it in attachment.
Please, do forward the call for papers in your networks and/or feel warmly invited to consider submitting a manuscript.
Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel) Annual Conference 2019: “Communicating Religion”

9-11 July 2019, Cardiff University

Charles Hirschkind (University of California-Berkeley)

Mia Lövheim (Uppsala University)

Jolyon Mitchell (University of Edinburgh)

As scholars of religion, we are all tasked with communicating religion in one way or another – to students, to the public, and to our research community. Moreover, what we study is itself a message: participants in our studies and creators of the documents we analyse are communicating religion, and what we receive as data is what Giddens referred to as the ‘double hermeneutic,’ or ideas and experiences that have already been mediated. What is the religion communicated to us? How do we communicate religion, and what is it that we communicate when we’re doing it?

Our focus is on “communicating” as a verb-like gerund rather than “communication” as a static, abstract noun. Scholars from different strands of the sociology of religion can imagine their work in it, and our topic engages the interests of colleagues in journalism, media and cultural studies; geography; music; English, communications and philosophy; social psychology; and law and politics.

The substance of communication can include evangelistic and apologistic discourse, education, media, and public policy interventions. We welcome diverse methodological approaches, including multi-modal and multi-sensory approaches to communicating religion. We understand communicating in multiple contexts, including academia, politics, education, social media and mass media. We imagine multiple frameworks that contour how we imagine communicating religion, encompassing the secular and the digital, the individual and the collective, the implicit and the explicit, the theoretical and the empirical.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

Please submit your abstracts online, before midnight Friday 1 February 2019, at:

https://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/Abstracts.aspx

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel) Annual Conference 2019: “Communicating Religion”

9-11 July 2019, Cardiff University

Charles Hirschkind (University of California-Berkeley)

Mia Lövheim (Uppsala University)

Jolyon Mitchell (University of Edinburgh)

As scholars of religion, we are all tasked with communicating religion in one way or another – to students, to the public, and to our research community. Moreover, what we study is itself a message: participants in our studies and creators of the documents we analyse are communicating religion, and what we receive as data is what Giddens referred to as the ‘double hermeneutic,’ or ideas and experiences that have already been mediated. What is the religion communicated to us? How do we communicate religion, and what is it that we communicate when we’re doing it?

Our focus is on “communicating” as a verb-like gerund rather than “communication” as a static, abstract noun. Scholars from different strands of the sociology of religion can imagine their work in it, and our topic engages the interests of colleagues in journalism, media and cultural studies; geography; music; English, communications and philosophy; social psychology; and law and politics.

The substance of communication can include evangelistic and apologistic discourse, education, media, and public policy interventions. We welcome diverse methodological approaches, including multi-modal and multi-sensory approaches to communicating religion. We understand communicating in multiple contexts, including academia, politics, education, social media and mass media. We imagine multiple frameworks that contour how we imagine communicating religion, encompassing the secular and the digital, the individual and the collective, the implicit and the explicit, the theoretical and the empirical.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

Please submit your abstracts online, before midnight Friday 1 February 2019, at:

https://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/Abstracts.aspx

CFP: “Post-global Religion”

We are welcoming submission for the open session “post-global religion” for the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR) conference “Religion – Continuations and Disruptions” from June 25 to June 29, 2019 in Tartu, Estonia. The deadline for individual papers is December 15, 2018.

OPEN SESSION (J. BORUP): Post-global Religion

Just like globalisation has been challenged by new political realities (walls, borders, boundaries, diversifications, enclavisations) in a post-global world, critical responses to globalisation also affects religious worlds. Reports from Pew Forum show more religious intolerance and less freedom of belief, and also religious voices applaud discourses of contraction. What could be termed ‘post-global religion’ is characterised by the strategic disruption of existing orders, and the articulation of a particularity re-enchantment. Just like post-colonial voices were critical responses to Western hegemony, post-global discourses and practices at both individual, institutional and national levels are critical reactions to globalisation, favouring the forces of centrifugal dispersion. This can be represented by anti-global religious re-nationalisation, re-ethnification, re-culturalisation, re-traditionalisation, re-racialisation, re-tribalism, re-territorialisation and re-configuration of the codes appropriating religious diversity. It can be seen in discourses and practices favouring monolithic cultural/national narratives, minority suppression, fractionalisation, downscaling of religious freedom. And it has increasingly been articulated in ‘culture wars’ with challenges of cultural appropriation and religionisation of political, cultural, ethnic or gender-related identity politics being turned into sacred authenticity claims.

This open session investigates disruptive responses to globalisation and articulations of strategic particularity in (the study of) religions. The session is explorative and invites scholars of religion to think with the term ‘post-global religion’ through both theoretical perspectives as well as empirical cases from around the world. Especially papers related to religious or cultural appropriation and identity politics (and their challenges to the study of religion) will be welcomed.

Deadline: 15th Dec 2018
Chair/contact: jb@cas.au.dk    
For more information about the call for papers please see: https://easr2019.org/call-for-individual-papers/

CFP: Religion and Urban Politics” as part of the ISSR Conference in Barcelona in July 2019

Convener(s):
Julia Martínez-Ariño
University of Groningen
j.martinez.arino@rug.nl

Abstract (English):
This panel addresses the general topic of the conference from an urban perspective. The panel will delve into the interaction(s) between religion and politics in city contexts, namely how religious discourses, practices, imaginaries, expectations and mobilisations affect or influence urban politics and how urban politics deal with, shape, regulate or ignore religion. Papers that analyse the intersection of and interaction between the two fields in different geographical and religious contexts are welcome. Some questions that the papers may address are: What are the channels of interaction between religion and politics in cities? How are these shaped, maintained, contested? Are religious actors present in governance networks and political structures? Does this involvement entail forms of co-optation of, and cooperation or competition between, religious and political actors? How do religious/spiritual groups and organisations get in contact with, influence or ignore urban political arenas? How are religion, spirituality and non-religion mobilised in identity claims and claims to the right to the city? How do religious actors articulate struggles over visibility and recognition in urban contexts? What is the scope of intervention of religious and spiritual leaders, groups, and advocates in urban politics? How do urban political processes and policies transform local religious groups? What are urban policy tools used to govern and regulate religion in urban contexts?

Abstract (French):
Ce panel aborde le sujet général de la conférence d’un point de vue urbain. Le panel explorera les interactions entre la religion et la politique dans les contextes urbains, à savoir comment les discours, les pratiques, les imaginaires, les attentes et les mobilisations religieux affectent ou influencent la politique urbaine et comment la politique urbaine traite, façonne, régule ou ignore la religion. Les articles qui analysent l’intersection et l’interaction des deux domaines dans différents contextes géographiques et religieux sont les bienvenus. Certaines questions que les contributions peuvent aborder sont : quels sont les canaux d’interaction entre la religion et la politique dans les villes ? Comment sont-ils façonnés, entretenus, contestés ? Les acteurs religieux sont-ils présents dans les réseaux de gouvernance et les structures politiques ? Cette participation implique-t-elle des formes de cooptation et de coopération ou de compétition entre les acteurs religieux et politiques ? Comment les groupes et organisations religieux / spirituels entrent-ils en contact, influencent-ils ou ignorent-ils les arènes politiques urbaines ? Comment la religion et la spiritualité sont-elles mobilisées dans les revendications identitaires et du droit à la ville ? Comment les acteurs religieux et non-religieux articulent les luttes sur la visibilité et la reconnaissance dans les contextes urbains ? Quel est le champ d’intervention des leaders et groupes religieux et spirituels dans la politique urbaine ? Comment les processus politiques et les politiques urbaines transforment-ils les groupes religieux locaux ? Quels sont les outils de l’action publique urbaine utilisés pour régir et réguler la religion ?

SUBMIT A PAPER

The deadline for submitting your abstracts is 16 December 2018

Call for papers: The 2nd Annual Conference of the East Asian Society for the Scientific Study of Religion

Theme: “East-West Encounters and Religious Change in Modernizing East Asia”

Dates: July 27-28, 2019

Place:  Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

East Asia has undergone globalization and modernization in the last five hundred years. The first encounter between East Asia and the modernizing West was with the Jesuit missionaries in the late 16th century in China, Korea, and Japan, where their inculturation strategy succeeded in attracting some converts in certain social circles. The cultural and political elites in these countries began to realize the uniqueness of the institutional religion of Catholicism in contrast to the local customary religiosities originated from Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. In response, Christianity was suppressed in East Asia until the mid-19th century, when the second encounter between the East and the West brought about waves of modernization to East Asian countries. Under the Western-hegemony, Asian countries were coerced to modernize or Westernize, adopting a modern system of law, bureaucracy, education system, and abolishing many of their own traditions. The concept of religion and the relationship between religion and the state have been constructed and reconstructed in the process of this East-West encounter in the process of modernization. Along with the introduction of science and technology, theory of evolution, atheism, and various ideologies, East Asian societies became rapidly secularized. In the first half of the 20th century, most states in East Asia enforced administrative control over religions.

Since the end of World War II in 1945, East Asian societies have diverged in their paths of social development and religious change. In mainland China, following a period of eradication of religion in the 1960s and 1970s, some religions have revived in spite of strong state control. In Taiwan, institutional Buddhism and other Chinese religions have undergone modernization and many religions have thrived since the end of martial law. South Korea has experienced the rapid rise of Christianity, with nearly 30% of the population identifying as either Protestant or Catholic. Japan retained traditional religions and added many new religions in the free market religious economy, but today organized religions are in steady decline due to aging and secularization. Why are these societies so different even though they shared similar traditional religiosities and experiences of modernization in response to the West? 

At present, East Asian countries have strengthened their economic and cultural exchanges despite occasional political tension among them. Religious exchange has also accelerated with the growth of missionaries and migrant populations. Religious diversity has increased and nationalism has risen in response to the perceived foreign religions. Meanwhile, religions or religiosities originating in East Asia have spread to the West and other parts of the world. How do the various states in the region manage religious pluralism and provide social space for migrants and missionary religions? How do individuals and communities of the Global East practice religion in late modernity?

In short, East Asia has varieties of religious institutions and communities, folk religions and new religions, and atheism and other secularisms. The research on religion in East Asia needs historical, sociological, political, and other perspectives. While all topics on religion are welcome at the conference, we especially invite papers that address one or more of the following research questions:

· How did religions and their practitioners in the Global East encounter and respond to Christianity backed by western modernity and hegemonic power in recent centuries?

· How were the concepts of the boundary between religion and secularity, administrative control of religions in authoritative regimes and the policy of religious pluralism formed in the Global East?

· What kind of similarity and difference in traditional and new religions are there in the Global East?

· How has secularization proceeded in the Global East and manifested in the growth of religious “nones” and in the new forms of “believing without belonging” and “belonging without believing”?

Beyond addressing these questions, we seek a range of papers that draw on different geographical contexts and religious traditions. We particularly encourage proposals of organized sessions with 3-4 papers addressing the same religion or topic. For individual papers we will arrange them in the session of similar topics.

DEADLINES:

  • Presentation proposals are due by January 31, 2019.  Please submit your paper’s title, abstract (200 to 500 words), author’s information by clicking here: Submit Paper Presentation Proposal for EASSSR 2019 Conference. For submission-related questions, please email: Lily C Szeto,  lszeto@purdue.edu .
  • Notification of acceptance of presentation proposals will be sent out by February 28, 2019.
  • Meeting Registration will be open between March 1 and 31, 2019.
  • Participants need to make their own hotel reservations (see information below).

CFP: “Approaching esotericism and mysticism: Cultural influences”

Call for Papers

The Donner Institute will arrange a symposium 5–7 June 2019 in Åbo/Turku, Finland

Approaching esotericism and mysticism: Cultural influences

Conference website: www.abo.fi/esomyst

Hashtag: #esomyst2019

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1954347284622536/

This multidisciplinary conference approaches the traditions of Western esotericism and mysticism from a cultural-historical perspective. The aim is to analyse the diverse influences of esoteric ideas and practices and the various forms of mysticism in their cultural-historical surroundings. We promote approaches that focus on individuals, groups and networks, and various archival source materials, but we also welcome papers dealing with esoteric or mystical textual traditions.

The conference will consist of keynote lectures and sessions that can be either traditional paper sessions or roundtable talks, panels and/or artistic performances. The social program of the conference will consist of e.g. esoteric and occult walking tours in Turku and artistic performances (plans for an event together with Art Teatro Circus -group). An excursion to the exhibition on Finnish art and clairvoyance at the Gallen-Kallela Museum (Espoo/Esbo, 11.5.–8.9.2019) is also being planned. The exhibition is part of the research project Seekers of the New and is curated by Nina Kokkinen.

Keynote speakers:

  • Per Faxneld, senior lecturer/associate professor at Södertörn University, Stockholm
  • Christine Ferguson, professor in English Literature at the University of Stirling

  • Olav Hammer, professor in the Department of History, Study of Religions at The University of Southern Denmark

  • Maarit Leskelä-Kärki (PhD, Adjunct Professor), University Lecturer at the Department of Cultural History at the University of Turku

The expert symposium is arranged jointly by the Donner Institute for Research in Religious and Cultural history and the research project Seekers of the New: Esotericism and the transformation of religiosity in the modernising Finland at the University of Turku. The project is funded by the Kone Foundation.

To apply, please send an abstract (or panel proposal with abstracts) of approximately 150 words to the Donner Institute, donner.institute@abo.fi, no later than 31 December 2018. Letters of acceptance will be posted no later than 31 January, 2019.

CFL: The Sixth Annual Conference of the British Association for Islamic Studies

*The deadline for abstracts (individual papers and panels) has been extended until 6 January 2019*

15 April – 16 April 2019 (Arrival and Registration from 14 April)
University of Nottingham

Following BRAIS’s successful conferences in Edinburgh (2014), London (2015 and 2016), Chester (2017) and Exeter (2018), the organisers invite proposals for whole panels or individual papers for the Sixth Annual Conference of BRAIS. Islamic Studies is broadly understood to include all disciplinary approaches to the study of Islam and Muslim societies (majority and minority), modern and premodern.

Plenary sessions at the conference

  • – Maribel Fierro (CSIC, Madrid) on ‘Rulers as Authors in the Medieval Islamic West’
  • – Khaled Fahmy (University of Cambridge) on ‘Implementing Shari’a in Modern Egypt: A Medical Perspective’
  • – Alison Scott-Baumann (SOAS, London) and the ‘Re/presenting Islam on Campus’ team

Abstract Deadline: Sunday 6 January 2019

For details on how to submit an abstract, see here <http://www.brais.ac.uk/conferences/brais-2019-call-for-papers>

Call for Papers: Gender and Religion: Correlates and Causes

Please submit here : https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/call-for-papers

ISSR 2019 Conference, https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conferences/conference-2019

International Society for the Sociology of Religion (Barcelona, Spain, 9-12 July 2019)

Convener(s):
Dr Yaghoob Foroutan,
Associate Professor at The University of Mazandaran

Abstract (English):
This panel focuses on the place of religion in gender dynamics and women’s status. The term ‘religion’ here refers to all religions around the world (Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, etc.), focusing either on a specific religion or on varying religions in order to highlight their role on women’s status from a comparative perspective. In particular, this panel explains the association between religion and gender in terms of a wide range of issues such as family formation patterns including marriage, childbearing and fertility, separation and divorce, new and emerging forms of family formation (like cohabitation etc.), religiosity, labour force participation and employment status, migration, intergenerational gaps related to the impact of religion on gender and women’s status. This panel addresses such key questions as, but limited to, how gender and religion are correlated? Whether and how women’s status is associated with their religion? What does happen to the association between religion and gender upon migration? Whether and how significantly do intergenerational variations exist in terms of the effect of religion on women’s status? Does the effect of a specific religion on women’s status vary in different settings? From a comparative perspective, what are the effects of varying religions (Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, etc.) on gender dynamics and women’s status? What are more important determinants than religion on women’s status? We welcome both quantitative and qualitative papers with central focus on the association between religion and gender from cultural, economic, demographic and sociological perspectives.