Call for Papers: Ritual Year Working Group Conference on City Rituals

The Call for the 13th conference of The Ritual Year WG is now open!
Our 13th conference will take place in Bucharest, 7-9 November 2018.
Paper submission deadline 15 April 2018.

The conference theme is City Rituals

Click here to download the Cfp.

For the 2018 conference of The Ritual Year Working Group, we ask ethnologists, anthropologists, sociologists and scholars in related fields to reflect on the following questions and topics in relation with the ritual year:

• The ritual year in the city (life cycle customs, calendric customs, other customs);
• Differences and similarities between the ritual year of multicultural urban and traditional rural societies;
• Religious versus non-religious rituals in the city;
• Urban holidays, celebrations and ceremonies;
• Urban feasts, festivals, events, carnivals;
• Cityscape before-during-after the celebration;
• Advertising city celebrations (media channels, actors, implications);
• Actors of city celebrations (organizers, performers, spectators, inhabitants);
• City celebrations and their multiple implications (political, social, economic, religious);
• The use of rituals in city planning and place marketing;
• The use of public urban space in the performance of rituals;
• Any other subject connected to the ritual year;

PAPER SUBMISSION
Please submit the title of your paper, an abstract of no more than 250 words, together with your name, academic affiliation, postal address and e-mail to ritualyear@siefhome.org. A confirmation message will be sent to you upon arrival, if you do not receive a confirmation within 24 hours of your submission, please resubmit. The papers must be written and presented in English or French. The conference papers will be published in a volume (as part of The Ritual Year Working Group’s yearbook series).

CONFERENCE VENUE
Romanian Academy (Casa Academiei – The House of the Academy) Calea 13 Septembrie nr.13 050711 Bucharest ROMANIA 44°25’20.6″N 26°05’13.6″E

Looking forward to being your host, in Bucharest,

Irina Stahl
Researcher, Institute of Sociology, Romanian Academy
Secretary of The Ritual Year Working Group (SIEF)
ritualyear@siefhome.org

CALL FOR PAPERS: Religion and Poverty

Thematic Collection in Palgrave Communications

Editors: Dr Gottfried Schweiger and Dr Helmut P Gaisbauer (University of Salzburg); Prof Clemens Sedmak (University of Notre Dame).

Website: https://www.nature.com/palcomms/for-authors/call-for-papers#religion-poverty

Submissions welcome on a rolling basis throughout 2018!

Poverty and religion are interrelated in different ways. On the one hand, for various religious traditions poverty is both an aspect of a particular faithful life (e.g. monastic communities) and giving to the poor is seen as a religious duty. Such traditions have evolved over time and expanded the role of faith-based organisations nowadays play in welfare provision and international development. Faith-based organizations play an important role in poverty alleviation both in rich and poor countries. These actions and practices, as well as their religious and theological underpinnings, deserve scrutiny. On the other hand, religion plays an important role in the life of people living in poverty: how they experience and shape their living, and how they find their place in society and the communities in which they. The role of religion in justifying certain inequalities and processes of exclusion (e.g. in India) and thus contributing to the sustainability of poverty is another important theme worth reflection.

We invite papers, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, that consider the following overarching question: how can religion be used as a vehicle to overcome structures of poverty, and how does it sometimes hinder such processes?

Contributions from sociology, development studies, religious studies, economics, theology, and other social sciences and humanities are welcomed; as are insights from different geographical settings, forms of poverty, and religious traditions.

This is a rolling article collection and as such submissions/proposals will be welcome throughout 2018.

This special issue is run in collaboration with the 2017 Salzburg Conference on Interdisciplinary Poverty Research, organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research of the University of Salzburg: www.poverty-conference.org

The 24th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion (NCSR 2018)

August 1-3, 2018 in Oslo, Norway.

Growing religious diversity characterizes most countries across the world, often linked to the globalization of migration, politics, economies, and the media. The diversity offers new challenges of managing religion in countries that previously were more religiously homogenous.

The 24th Nordic Conference for Sociology of Religion seeks a more thorough understanding, theoretically as well as empirically, of religion, politics, and boundaries. While sociologists often have attempted to understand these developments in terms of single dimension theories, we would like to find out how this complexity is part of processes of change and continuity in contemporary society.
We invite papers that focus on these and other topics in the sociology of religion.

CHOOSE A SESSION AND SUBMIT YOUR PAPER

Deadlines:

  • Paper proposals are due on April 6. 2018
  • Decision Notification: April 30. 2018
  • Registration open: April 30. 2018
  • Registration closes: June 15. 2018

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS AT THE CONFERENCE:

KEYNOTE #1
Mark Juergensmeyer,
University of California at Santa Barbara, USA

The Global Rise of Religious Violence.
KEYNOTE #2
Line
Nyhagen,
Reader in sociology, Loughborough University, UK

Contestations of Feminism, Secularism and Religion.
KEYNOTE #3
Lorne
Dawson,
University of Waterloo,
Canada

Understanding the Role of Religion in the Radicalization of Foreign Fighters in Syria and Iraq.

PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Ecclesiology and Ethnography Conference, Winnipeg, June 2018.

We are delighted to announce that Dr. Christopher Brittain, formerly of Aberdeen, and now Dean of Trinity College University of Toronto, will be keynote presenter at the inaugural Canadian Conference on Ecclesiology and Ethnography. We have had an excellent response to our first CFP as well as sustained interest in the conference. We are therefore sending out this second Call For Papers for the conference for those who might still be interested. Please pass it on to any students, scholars, and others who might want to participate and/or present.

Details for submission for papers and can be found here: http://www.ecclesiologyandethnography.com/event/ecclesiology-and-ethnography-canada/

For further information contact the organising group at eande2018@cmu.ca

Populist Politics & the Minority Voice: British Muslims, Extremisms & Inclusion

A one-day Muslims in Britain Research Network (MBRN) conference organised in partnership with the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College London (KCL), University of London

19 April 2018

Register at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/populist-politics-the-minority-voice-british-muslims-extremisms-inclusion-tickets-42902695116

Our hosts King’s College have generously provided financial support for the event which means we are able to keep the costs for registration down to £15 for general admission and £10 for PhD students and unwaged members (plus booking fee).

Themes include:

  • Muslim activism and populist politics;
  • New media, populism and the representation of Muslims and other minorities;
  • Recognising, opposing and offering alternatives to anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and other extremisms;
  • British Muslims and national identity after Brexit;
  • Challenges to, and for, principles of tolerance, free speech and accommodation.

Plenary speakers

Narzanin Massoumi, University of Exeter & editor, What is Islamophobia?
Aaron Winter, University of East London
David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism

More TBC…

Additional speakers

Reza Gholami, University of Birmingham
Khadijah Elshayyal, University of Edinburgh
Mirjam Aeschbach, University of Zurich
Shanon Shah, Critical Muslim
Ajmal Hussain, University of Manchester
Laura Jones, Cardiff University
Waqas Tufail, Leeds Beckett University
Gillian Kennedy, King’s College London
Kristin Henrard, ESL, Rotterdam
Ayesha Chowdhury, Leeds Becket University
Laurens de Rooij, University of Cape Town

Conference outline

Across Europe and North America populist parties and leaders have surged in recent years, with figures such as Donald Trump and Andrej Babiš and parties such as UKIP and Alternative für Deutschland making significant electoral gains. Although different in important respects, these movements share certain themes, such as emphasis on national self-interest and hostility toward international co-operation, liberal political norms and established news media. In almost all cases this desire to reassert national identity has also involved renewed hostility toward ethnic and religious minorities – especially Jewish and Muslim minorities – as well as toward any frameworks of liberal accommodation that have allowed minorities to participate in public life on an equal footing. In the UK, this was evident in the referendum on European Union membership in 2016, which not only destabilised previously taken-for-granted political and legal frameworks but also contributed to a sustained rise in hate crime, anti-immigration rhetoric and Islamophobia.

This one-day conference on ‘Populist politics and the minority voice’ will discuss the effects of these changes on British Muslims, and how the concerns of British Muslims relate to those of other minority groups as well as wider debates about the future of liberal states, free speech and ‘fake news’. Since at least the 1970s, British Muslims – as a group and alongside other minorities – have been involved in a struggle for rights, for media and political representation and for recognition. What might these struggles look like in the future? What is the future of British Muslim identity, post-Brexit? How might rights and legal accommodations be affected by withdrawal from the EU? How do concerns about rising Islamophobia intersect with concerns about resurgent anti-Semitism and far-right and populist movements? How should debates about Muslims and the media proceed in an era of ‘fake news’? How can standards of debate about minorities be preserved and what can higher education and Muslim institutions contribute?

Lecture/Event: “Is God Really Dead? Why Belief Matters”, Professor Eileen Barker

Monday 12 February 2018, 6.30-8pm
London School of Economics, Old Theatre, Old Building
Hosted by the Department of Sociology

  • Speaker: Professor Eileen Barker, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at LSE with Special Reference to the Study of Religion.
  • Respondent: Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law at LSE
  • Chair: Professor Nigel Dodd, Professor of Sociology, LSE

Thirty years after founding INFORM, the information network on religious movements, Eileen Barker argues that the sociology of religion still has an important role in “knowing the causes of things”.

This event will celebrate Eileen’s work over the past 30 years. A celebratory drinks reception
will follow the lecture.

This event is free and open to all.
Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

More information at: http://www.lse.ac.uk/Events/2018/02/20180212t1830vOT/is-god-really-dead

Poster for “Is God Really Dead?”, with Prof. Eileen Barker

Repostings from the AASR: Calls for Papers, Book Announcements, and Job Openings.

Here are the latest event, book, and job announcements from the newsletter of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Click the links or visit https://www.aasr.org.au/january-2018/ for information.

Call for Papers

Islamic Ethics and the Trusteeship Paradigm: Interdisciplinary Explorations

Religious Marriages in the Mediterranean Conference 20-21st March 2018

Religion Area for the 9th Annual International Conference of the Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand July 2-4, 2018

Disputing Religion and Politics Research: How Western/Eurocentric is its Agenda? Hamburg 24-26 August 2018

Populist politics and the minority voice: British Muslims, extremisms and inclusion 19 April 2018

Multiple Religious Identities – Individuals, Communities, Traditions
16th Annual Conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR) / IAHR Regional Conference, Bern 2018

Religions and Identities in the European Migration Crisis – Abstract deadline: January, 31

Post-global Religion, EASR conference 17-21 June in Bern

Academic Publications

Siddiqi, Bulbul (2018) Becoming ‘Good Muslim’: The Tablighi Jamaat in the UK and Bangladesh, Springer

Chakrabarti, Anindita (2018) Faith and Social Movements: Religious Reform in Contemporary India, published by Cambridge University Press

Knut A. Jacobsen (2018) Yoga in Modern Hinduism: Hariharānanda Āraṇya and Sāṃkhyayoga, Routeldge

Foroutan, Y. (2017), Muslim Minority of New Zealand in Global Context: Demographic Perspective, Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, 37 (4): 511-519.

Račius, Egdūnas (2018) Muslims in Eastern Europe, Edinburgh University Press

Academic Positions

Four Ph.D. research fellowships available at MF-Norwegian    School of Theology

Two vacancies as postdoc at MF-Norwegian School of Theology, with effect from 1st of September 2018

(Thanks to Dr Milad Milani)

Call for Papers for the Panel On Religion and Politics: Post- and Decolonial Interventions

ECPR General Conference, Hamburg 24-26 August 2018

Section: Revisiting Religion and Politics Research: Achievements, Critique, Future Questions

Panel Chair: Zubair Ahmad, BGSMCS, Freie Universität Berlin (zubair@zedat.fuberlin.de)

Discussant: N.N.
Deadline: 4th February, 2018 Panel Description

Postcolonial and Decolonial analyses have developed an extensive and valuable body of scholarship. In doing so, they have problematized and critiqued the Eurocentric formation of colonial modernity, along with its forms of epistemic and sociopolitical violence, its contradictions, and contingencies. Furthermore, they have altered analytical avenues in order to critically reevaluate the persistence of Eurocentric hegemonies (normative assumptions, epistemological structures, and power effects) accompanying and underpinning our present. Whereas these scholars have significantly shaped disciplines such as history, comparative literature, anthropology, or the study of religion, it is remarkable how their contributions remain marginal, if not absent, within the study of politics.

Against this backdrop, this panel seeks to provide a forum for critically engaging with postcolonial and decolonial scholarship. It does this by specifically turning toward the, by now, famous dyad of religion and politics. Departing from the premises that European colonization has been a “major, extended and ruptural world-historical event” (Stuart Hall), postcolonial and decolonial interrogations have long suggested convoluted histories of religion and politics. The epistemic, conceptual, and effective formation and history of religion and politics, as a dyad, these scholars suggest, has taken place in close proximity with Europe’s colonial endeavors – their reverberation and duress haunting our very present. From knowing and governing the colonized and (post-)colonial Other to ordering the colony, religion and politics have a longer history and much more complex presence than the liberal paradigm of investigation usually suggests, or forces upon our very inquiries. Engaging with the relationship of religion and politics since the 1970s and 1980s, subfields such as comparative politics or political theory have neglected these and other postcolonial/decolonial insights while keeping colonial epistemologies, divisions, questions, and orders in tact.

In order to address this troubling state-of-affairs within the study of politics, the panel invites contributions from decisively postcolonial or/and decolonial perspectives. The overall aim is twofold: Firstly, to evaluate and problematize the hegemonic, and therefore persistent, analytical avenues taken within a more mainstream engagement with religion and politics and, secondly, to broaden the scope of engagement, depth, and analysis by introducing postcolonial/decolonial questions, epistemologies, modes of investigation, and problematizations to an important and still ongoing debate.

Please submit your abstract (350-500 words) to Zubair Ahmad (zubair@zedat.fu-berlin.de) no later than 4th February.

Zubair Ahmad

Doctoral Fellow

Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies

Freie Universität Berlin

Altensteinstraße 48 | 14195 Berlin

Public lecture: “La nation, la laïcité et le pluralisme religieux”, Wednesday, January 24th, University of Sherbrook

La nation, la laïcité et le pluralisme religieux

Date : Le mercredi 24 janvier 2018

Heure : De 12 h 00 à 13 h 30

Lieu : Campus principal de Sherbrooke, Faculté de droit, local A9-162

Cette conférence sera présentée par Michel Seymour, professeur titulaire au département de philosophie de l’Université de Montréal.

Pour plus d’information sur la conférence, visitez la page suivante :https://www.usherbrooke.ca/sodrus/accueil/evenements/evenements-details/e/35376/

Call for Papers: panel on “ Being religious, being scientific: the dynamics of science and religion in the laboratory ”

(Submitted by Joseph Satish, from the University of Hyderabad, India.)

I write to invite paper abstracts from members of the ISA Sociology of Religion Network, to our open panel, “ Being religious, being scientific: the dynamics of science and religion in the laboratory ” (Panel #30), at this year’s Annual Meeting of the  Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) in Sydney, 29 August – 1 September 2018.

In keeping with the theme of the conference “TRANSnational STS”, we invite contributions from scholars all over the world, who have explored questions related to the panel, from the perspectives of Science, Technology & Society Studies (STS), Religious Studies, Sociology and Anthropology of Religion, History of Science and related disciplines, across local, national and transnational units of analysis.

Abstract submissions (upto 250 words) to our panel can be made at the conference website via:  https://4s2018sydney.org/call-for-papers-open-panels/ . The abstract should contain the paper’s main arguments, methods, and contributions to STS and related disciplines. The deadline is February 1, 2018.