New Book: “Somali, Muslim, British: Striving in Securitized Britain”

Giulia Liberatore (2017) Somali, Muslim, British: Striving in Securitized Britain. Bloomsbury/ LSE Monographs in Social Anthropology

A paperback version will be available in 2018.

Preview chapters are available here:

http://Bloomsburycp3.codemantra.com/Widget_Marketing.aspx?ID=1234567&ISBN=9781350027718&sts=r

About the book:

Somalis are one of the most chastised Muslim communities in Europe. Depicted in the news as victims of female genital mutilation, perpetrators of gang violence, or more recently, as radical Islamists, Somalis have been cast as a threat to social cohesion, national identity, and security in Britain and beyond.  Somali, Muslim, British shifts attention away from these public representations to provide a detailed ethnographic study of Somali Muslim women’s engagements with religion, political discourses, and public culture in the United Kingdom. The book chronicles the aspirations of different generations of Somali women as they respond to publicly charged questions of what it means to be Muslim, Somali, and British. By challenging and reconfiguring the dominant political frameworks in which they are immersed, these women imagine new ways of being in securitized Britain. Giulia Liberatore provides a nuanced account of Islamic piety, arguing that it needs to be understood as one among many forms of striving that individuals pursue throughout their lives. Bringing new perspectives to debates about Islam and multiculturalism in Europe, this book makes an important contribution to the anthropology of religion, subjectivity, and gender

New Issue of Religion & Gender, with emphasis on Shari’a Family Law Studies

Religion and Gender has just published its latest issue (Summer issue 2017) at https://www.religionandgender.org/.

It includes independent research articles, the special issue ‘New Perspectives on Gender in Shari‘a-Based Family Law Studies: Moving Beyond the Women’s Issue’ guest edited by Betty de Hart, Nadia Sonneveld and Iris Sportel, and a number of book reviews.

Table of Contents
https://www.religionandgender.org/jms/issue/view/581

Articles (open section)
——–
Gendering Prayer: Millennial-generation Catholics and the Embodiment of Feminine Genius and Authentic Masculinity (1-17)
        Katherine Anne Dugan
The Embodied Mother of God and the Identities of Orthodox Women in Finland and Setoland (18-41)
        Andreas Kalkun, Elina Vuola

Guest Editorial
——–
New Perspectives on Gender in Shari‘a-Based Family Law Studies: Moving Beyond the Women’s Issue (42-52)
        Betty de Hart,  Nadia Sonneveld, Iris Sportel

Articles (special issue)
——–
Who’s Afraid of Islamic Family Law? Dealing with Shari‘a-based Family Law Systems in the Netherlands (53-69)
        Iris Sportel
Divorce among Transnational Finnish Somalis: Gender, Religion, and Agency (70-87)
        Mulki Al-Sharmani
From the Liberation of Women to the Liberation of Men? A Century of Family Law Reform in Egypt (88-104)
        Nadia Sonneveld
Judicial Activism in the Context of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution: Emerging Conceptions of Femininity and Masculinity (105-120)
        Monika Lindbekk

New Issue of Religion & Gender, with emphasis on Shari’a Family Law Studies

Religion and Gender has just published its latest issue (Summer issue 2017) at https://www.religionandgender.org/.

It includes independent research articles, the special issue ‘New Perspectives on Gender in Shari‘a-Based Family Law Studies: Moving Beyond the Women’s Issue’ guest edited by Betty de Hart, Nadia Sonneveld and Iris Sportel, and a number of book reviews.

Table of Contents
https://www.religionandgender.org/jms/issue/view/581

Articles (open section)
——–
Gendering Prayer: Millennial-generation Catholics and the Embodiment of Feminine Genius and Authentic Masculinity (1-17)
        Katherine Anne Dugan
The Embodied Mother of God and the Identities of Orthodox Women in Finland and Setoland (18-41)
        Andreas Kalkun, Elina Vuola

Guest Editorial
——–
New Perspectives on Gender in Shari‘a-Based Family Law Studies: Moving Beyond the Women’s Issue (42-52)
        Betty de Hart,  Nadia Sonneveld, Iris Sportel

Articles (special issue)
——–
Who’s Afraid of Islamic Family Law? Dealing with Shari‘a-based Family Law Systems in the Netherlands (53-69)
        Iris Sportel
Divorce among Transnational Finnish Somalis: Gender, Religion, and Agency (70-87)
        Mulki Al-Sharmani
From the Liberation of Women to the Liberation of Men? A Century of Family Law Reform in Egypt (88-104)
        Nadia Sonneveld
Judicial Activism in the Context of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution: Emerging Conceptions of Femininity and Masculinity (105-120)
        Monika Lindbekk

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Religion & Poverty

Religion and Poverty

Editors: Dr Gottfried Schweiger and Dr Helmut P Gaisbauer (Centre for Ethic and Poverty Research, University of Salzburg, Austria); Prof Clemens Sedmak (Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College London, UK/Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research, University of Salzburg, Austria).

Poverty and religion are interrelated in different ways. On the one hand, for various religious traditions poverty is both an aspect of a particular faithful life (e.g. monastic communities) and giving to the poor is seen as a religious duty. Such traditions have evolved over time and expanded the role of faith-based organisations nowadays play in welfare provision and international development. Faith-based organizations play an important role in poverty alleviation both in rich and poor countries. These actions and practices, as well as their religious and theological underpinnings, deserve scrutiny. On the other hand, religion plays an important role in the life of people living in poverty: how they experience and shape their living, and how they find their place in society and the communities in which they. The role of religion in justifying certain inequalities and processes of exclusion (e.g. in India) and thus contributing to the sustainability of poverty is another important theme worth reflection.

We invite papers, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, that consider the following overarching question: how can religion be used as a vehicle to overcome structures of poverty, and how does it sometimes hinder such processes?

Contributions from sociology, development studies, religious studies, economics, theology, and other social sciences and humanities are welcomed; as are insights from different geographical settings, forms of poverty, and religious traditions.

This is a rolling article collection and as such submissions/proposals will be welcome throughout 2017. However, full submissions received by September 30 will be considered for publication as part of the collection’s formal launch.

This special issue is run in collaboration with the 2017 Salzburg Conference on Interdisciplinary Poverty Research, organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research of the University of Salzburg.

See: https://www.nature.com/palcomms/for-authors/call-for-papers#religion-poverty

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Religion & Poverty

Religion and Poverty

Editors: Dr Gottfried Schweiger and Dr Helmut P Gaisbauer (Centre for Ethic and Poverty Research, University of Salzburg, Austria); Prof Clemens Sedmak (Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College London, UK/Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research, University of Salzburg, Austria).

Poverty and religion are interrelated in different ways. On the one hand, for various religious traditions poverty is both an aspect of a particular faithful life (e.g. monastic communities) and giving to the poor is seen as a religious duty. Such traditions have evolved over time and expanded the role of faith-based organisations nowadays play in welfare provision and international development. Faith-based organizations play an important role in poverty alleviation both in rich and poor countries. These actions and practices, as well as their religious and theological underpinnings, deserve scrutiny. On the other hand, religion plays an important role in the life of people living in poverty: how they experience and shape their living, and how they find their place in society and the communities in which they. The role of religion in justifying certain inequalities and processes of exclusion (e.g. in India) and thus contributing to the sustainability of poverty is another important theme worth reflection.

We invite papers, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, that consider the following overarching question: how can religion be used as a vehicle to overcome structures of poverty, and how does it sometimes hinder such processes?

Contributions from sociology, development studies, religious studies, economics, theology, and other social sciences and humanities are welcomed; as are insights from different geographical settings, forms of poverty, and religious traditions.

This is a rolling article collection and as such submissions/proposals will be welcome throughout 2017. However, full submissions received by September 30 will be considered for publication as part of the collection’s formal launch.

This special issue is run in collaboration with the 2017 Salzburg Conference on Interdisciplinary Poverty Research, organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research of the University of Salzburg.

See: https://www.nature.com/palcomms/for-authors/call-for-papers#religion-poverty

New Book: Sexual Diversity and Religious Systems: Transnational Dialogues in the Contemporary World

by Martín Jaime (Editor)

http://urpilibros.com/diversidad-sexual-y-sistemas-religiosos-dialogos-trasnacionales-en-el-mundo-contemporaneosexual-diversity-and-religious-systems-transnational-dialo-p-1086.html?zenid=9bcc60fc5607f10142845bb4bf25397e

Programa de Estudios de Género, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

Flor Tristán Centro de la Mujer Peruana

ISBN: 978-612-4033-24-7

Sexual Diversity and Religious Systems analyzes the relations between numerous expressions of sexual diversity and, some religious systems today. In contemporary societies, the relation between sexual diversity and the religious phenomenon has proven to be impressively rich.

On one hand, we witness the continuous rejection of sexual diversity within many religions through different strategies appealing to concepts like tradition, moral and nature. On the other, many groups has addressed the question and challenge within the LGBTI movement and within its own religious communities of thinking on the production of spirituality from the position of the sexual subject itself. In this scenario, we see how the work of representing spirituality within said communities is a way to go beyond the sexual subject and subvert spiritual expropriation. Currently, we can find several ways; we see the construction of religious communities based on sexual orientation and, in some cases, on gender identity and, at the same time, some religions with a brutal rejection on the same topic. Both ways live and meet at the same time.

This book, written in English and Spanish, consists of ten papers studying this phenomenon within Christianity, Judaism and Islam. Based on different methods and sources, they insist on understanding how religions influence and embody homoerotic and transgender practices and how the latter embrace and transform them. It takes us through the realities of many countries such as Chile, Argentina, Canada, United Kingdom, France and Iran.

Thus, in the face of this scenario, is crucial to take a comparative and systematic look on the relations between religious systems and LGTBI corposubjectivities in the contemporary world. In that way, this compilation seeks to present different perspectives of analysis on said relation from a comparative perspective within specific local and regional frames. These articles show us numerous analysis on the spirituality of people with homoerotic and transgender practices and desires, emphasizing on the study of historical, social and cultural dynamics where religious traditions play a relevant role on the encouragement or rejection of the rights of LGBTI people in contemporary societies. Also, this book aims at reflecting on spiritual productions (practices, rituals, perceptions, among others) carried out by LGBTI people within religious traditions.

New Book: Sexual Diversity and Religious Systems: Transnational Dialogues in the Contemporary World

by Martín Jaime (Editor)

http://urpilibros.com/diversidad-sexual-y-sistemas-religiosos-dialogos-trasnacionales-en-el-mundo-contemporaneosexual-diversity-and-religious-systems-transnational-dialo-p-1086.html?zenid=9bcc60fc5607f10142845bb4bf25397e

Programa de Estudios de Género, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

Flor Tristán Centro de la Mujer Peruana

ISBN: 978-612-4033-24-7

Sexual Diversity and Religious Systems analyzes the relations between numerous expressions of sexual diversity and, some religious systems today. In contemporary societies, the relation between sexual diversity and the religious phenomenon has proven to be impressively rich.

On one hand, we witness the continuous rejection of sexual diversity within many religions through different strategies appealing to concepts like tradition, moral and nature. On the other, many groups has addressed the question and challenge within the LGBTI movement and within its own religious communities of thinking on the production of spirituality from the position of the sexual subject itself. In this scenario, we see how the work of representing spirituality within said communities is a way to go beyond the sexual subject and subvert spiritual expropriation. Currently, we can find several ways; we see the construction of religious communities based on sexual orientation and, in some cases, on gender identity and, at the same time, some religions with a brutal rejection on the same topic. Both ways live and meet at the same time.

This book, written in English and Spanish, consists of ten papers studying this phenomenon within Christianity, Judaism and Islam. Based on different methods and sources, they insist on understanding how religions influence and embody homoerotic and transgender practices and how the latter embrace and transform them. It takes us through the realities of many countries such as Chile, Argentina, Canada, United Kingdom, France and Iran.

Thus, in the face of this scenario, is crucial to take a comparative and systematic look on the relations between religious systems and LGTBI corposubjectivities in the contemporary world. In that way, this compilation seeks to present different perspectives of analysis on said relation from a comparative perspective within specific local and regional frames. These articles show us numerous analysis on the spirituality of people with homoerotic and transgender practices and desires, emphasizing on the study of historical, social and cultural dynamics where religious traditions play a relevant role on the encouragement or rejection of the rights of LGBTI people in contemporary societies. Also, this book aims at reflecting on spiritual productions (practices, rituals, perceptions, among others) carried out by LGBTI people within religious traditions.

Deadline for World Congress Paper Proposals is approaching!

Paper Proposal Deadline: 30 September, 2017

World Congress of Sociology, Toronto, Canada, July 15-21, 2018

The deadline for submitting paper proposals for the 2018 World Congress is fast approaching.  They must be submitted online by midnight GMT on 30 September.

Read the session descriptions and find the most appropriate session for your paper.  Follow the links to submit your paper.

Each session organizer will choose 10 papers for formal presentation — 5 as primary (“oral”) papers and 5 as backups (“distributed papers”), many of which will end up being presented orally.

The remaining acceptable submissions will be passed to the Program Coordinators, who will find another place for them on the program.

Each scholar can appear on the program a maximum of twice.

Deadline for World Congress Paper Proposals is approaching!

Paper Proposal Deadline: 30 September, 2017

World Congress of Sociology, Toronto, Canada, July 15-21, 2018

The deadline for submitting paper proposals for the 2018 World Congress is fast approaching.  They must be submitted online by midnight GMT on 30 September.

Read the session descriptions and find the most appropriate session for your paper.  Follow the links to submit your paper.

Each session organizer will choose 10 papers for formal presentation — 5 as primary (“oral”) papers and 5 as backups (“distributed papers”), many of which will end up being presented orally.

The remaining acceptable submissions will be passed to the Program Coordinators, who will find another place for them on the program.

Each scholar can appear on the program a maximum of twice.

New books from the Center for Religion and Civic Culture

We are excited to announce that two books from our Pentecostal and Charismatic Research Initiative were published this summer:

Congrats to all the authors!