CFP: Conference on Leadership, Authority and Representation in British Muslim Communities

This one-day conference brings together academics and activists to explore issues of leadership, authority and representation in British Muslim communities.  Who speaks for British Muslims?  How is authority construed, constructed and exercised in an age of mass media and the Internet?  What internal and external factors shape leadership structures and modalities of representation for British Muslims living as a minority in a culturally Christian but largely secular social context?  Where do leaders come from in a decentralised religious tradition lacking a priestly hierarchy?  How do government discourses and media representations impact upon dynamics of leadership and authority in British Muslim communities?

  • Keynote Lectures by:
  • Ataullah Siddiqui (Markfield Institute of Higher Education)
  • Shaukat Warraich (Faith Associates)

Panel Discussion on ‘The Future Role of Imams in the UK’ with:

  • Saleem Kidwai (Chair)
  • Shuruq Naguib
  • Atif Imtiaz
  • Mufti Abdur Rahman Mangera
  • Myriam Francois-Cerrah
  • Imam Qari Asim

This conference has been organised in conjunction with a special issue of the international journal Religions jointly edited by Professor Sophie Gilliat-Ray and Dr Riyaz Timol.  Delegates may be invited to submit a paper for publication, subject to normal peer-review procedures, after the event.  The deadline for final paper submissions is 25 April 2019.

Call for Papers: (EASR) “Religion – Continuations and Disruptions”

17th Annual Conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions

Religions are works in progress. New ideas, doctrines and practices have appeared time and again and often spread across cultural and confessional boundaries. Some of the changes have been intentional, introduced by powerful individuals and institutions, others have emerged more spontaneously as vernacular reactions to innovations imposed from ‘above’.  Some elements in religions have persisted for centuries, some have disappeared and some reappeared in completely new forms or acquired new meanings. Similar processes can be observed around us in contemporary societies as well.

Yet, oftentimes scholars of religion have struggled with studying such constantly changing and transforming phenomena. This leads us to ask how many disruptions or interruptions can a tradition adapt or even embrace, while still maintaining its identity. At the same time studying change (or the lack thereof) arises several conceptual and methodological problems. First of all, how does one conceptualize change without implying a static research object? This is also a problem of evaluation and rhetorical power – who has the authority to claim that something is extinct or that a new tradition has been established? What is the scholar’s responsibility for the field of studies? When and to what extent do scholars have to take into account the views of insiders in reflecting upon religious traditions or in drawing boundaries between them?

Aside from ‘conventional’ religion and religiosity, considering various ‘spiritualities’ and the rise of the numbers of people with no clear religious affiliation, how does one study a phenomenon which has lost its visibility or moved into the private sphere?  Or how does one make sense of the continuities and disruptions in a world where more and more people simultaneously participate in several traditions, either religious or secular?

The conference will focus on these and related questions, examining religious traditions worldwide. In addition, it calls for reflecting upon continuities and disruptions in the history of religious studies. Our conceptual tools, theoretical frameworks, methodologies and even the category of religion have been changing. Is it necessary to strive for unity in the discipline or rather celebrate the pluralism in the study of religions? And how to depict change, so that the complicated dynamic of religious transformation is also reflected through the conceptual tools we use?

See details at https://easr2019.org/

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel) Annual Conference 2019

9-11 July 2019, Cardiff University
THEME: Communicating Religion

Plenary Speakers:

  • Charles Hirschkind (University of California-Berkeley)
  • Mia Lövheim (Uppsala University)
  • Third speaker TBC

As scholars of religion, we are all tasked with communicating religion in one way or another – to students, to the public, and to our research community. Moreover, what we study is itself a message: participants in our studies and creators of the documents we analyse are communicating religion, and what we receive as data is what Giddens referred to as the ‘double hermeneutic,’ or ideas and experiences that have already been mediated. What is the religion communicated to us? How do we communicate religion, and what is it that we communicate when we’re doing it?
Our focus is on “communicating” as a verb-like gerund rather than “communication” as a static, abstract noun. Scholars from different strands of the sociology of religion can imagine their work in it, and our topic engages the interests of colleagues in journalism, media and cultural studies; geography; music; English, communications and philosophy; social psychology; and law and politics.

The substance of communication can include evangelistic and apologistic discourse, education, media, and public policy interventions. We welcome diverse methodological approaches, including multi-modal and multi-sensory approaches to communicating religion. We understand communicating in multiple contexts, including academia, politics, education, social media and mass media. We imagine multiple frameworks that contour how we imagine communicating religion, encompassing the secular and the digital, the individual and the collective, the implicit and the explicit, the theoretical and the empirical.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

You will be able to submit abstracts through a web portal on the BSA website. Please keep watch for further details, through this mailing list, our social media channels, and the Socrel website.

Conference Bursaries:  A limited number of bursaries are available to support postgraduate, early career, low income or unwaged SocRel members to present at the conference. Please visit http://socrel.org.uk/socrel-annual-bursary-scheme/ for instructions, and to download an application form, and submit your bursary application along with your abstract by 1 February 2019.

Socrel is mindful of the various sensitivities people carry concerning content. If you feel that the presentation you give may include material that may be upsetting, please consider including a note about this content in your abstract. We will not restrict or censor presentations that include sensitive or alarming content, but by flagging it in the abstract, those who attend the conference can make informed decisions on which panel they might choose to attend.

Abstract submission: Open soon!

  • Early bird registration opens: 3 November 2018
  • Abstract submission closes: 1 February 2019
  • Decision notification: 15 February 2019
  • Presenter registration closes: 29 March 2019
  • Early bird registration closes: 7 June 2019
  • Registration closes: 28 June 2019

Please note that after 7 June 2019, a £50 late registration fee will apply to all bookings.

Should you have other questions about the conference please also contact the conference organisers, Dr Michael Munnik (Cardiff University) or Dr Peter Hemming (Cardiff University) socrel19@cardiff.ac.uk
For further details, visit the SocRel website: www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/sociology-of-religion-study-group/ For further details about the BSA visit www.britsoc.co.uk

Conference CFP: Psychology of Religion and Spirituality: New Trends and Neglected Themes

The International Association for the Psychology of Religion (IAPR) holds bi-annual conferences that serve as a meeting point for scholars from all over the world to share the latest research findings in the field. We are pleased and honored to announce that the IAPR Conference 2019 will be held in Gdańsk, Poland and will take place from August 31st – September 3rd.

This year, we would like to summarize the current knowledge within the title Psychology of Religion and Spirituality: New Trends and Neglected Themes. We would like to encourage you to submit a paper and share this announcement with interested colleagues.  Please refer to the Conference website: https://poland2019.iaprweb.org/

Open registration: 1st of Nov. 2018

Deadline for abstracts: 1st of Feb. 2019

Organizers:

  • International Association for the Psychology of Religion
  • University of Gdańsk (Institute of Psychology)
  • Polish Society for the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

AASR and NZASR joint Conference 2018:

Ngā Wāhi Tapu/Sacred Place: Continuity and Change

at: University of Auckland – visit conference website:  http://www.nzasr.ac.nz/conference/index.php/annual/2018

November 29, 2018 – November 30, 2018

The third Joint Conference of the New Zealand Association for the Study of Religions (NZASR) and the Australian Association for the Study of Religions (AASR) will be  hosted by the University of Auckland 29-30 November 2018. The plenary sessions of the conference this year will be held in the Waipapa Marae and the Maclaurin Chapel, two sacred sites on the University of Auckland campus, which reveal both continuity and change in this particular context.

The study of sacred place has been receiving renewed attention in the interdisciplinary study of religion. It includes a consideration of familiar institutions—temples, shrines, and churches—but also extends to less visible sites that ground everyday life in ritual practices in the home or in public spaces that are outside the boundaries of “official” religion. In spite of the evidence for secularization, the renewal and revitalization of sacred places is occurring in contemporary societies and transforming many urban areas such as Auckland, Sydney, and Melbourne. This is due in part to recent patterns of immigration and the growth in religious diversity with the arrival of new religious traditions and the flourishing of diaspora communities. The movement of peoples and the increase in interreligious encounters is creating a dynamic situation of mutual transformation and contributing to both de/re-territorialization of religion as some sacred sites are appropriated by new actors and groups representing alternatives to established religious institutions.

Click HERE for the Conference Program (PDF)

INFORM Seminar: “Health & Healing in Minority Religions”, 24 November, King’s College, London

Early Bird Registration ends 4th November.

Registration is now open for the next Inform Seminar, Health and Healing in Minority Religions, in conjunction with the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College, London.

Saturday 24th November 2018, 10am-5pm (registration at 9.30). Bush House Lecture Theatre 1, King’s College, London, 30 Aldwych, London, WC2B 4BG.

Please visit http://inform.ac/seminar-payment to book tickets via paypal or credit/debit card.

Registration costs:

Standard: £38

Unwaged/ university student: £18

A Level student: £10

After 4th November, ticket prices will increase by £10, across all three categories and refunds will not be offered.

Provisional Programme:

10.00-10.10           Welcome

10.10-10.35           Eileen Barker, FAcSS, FBA, OBE, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the London School of Economics  – Religious Attitudes to the Body, Health and Healing

10.35-11.00           Tony Brace, The European Association of Jehovah’s Witnesses – Jehovah’s Witnesses and Blood Transfusion: Faith or Fanaticism?

11.00-11.25           Carole M. Cusack, University of Sydney – G. I. Gurdjieff on Health and Healing: Diet, Fasting and Spiritual Exercises

11.25-11.55           Coffee

11.55-12.20          Sarah Harvey, Senior Research Officer, Inform – Illness as Impurity: practices for cleansing and purifying the body

12.20-12.45          Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit in the Psychology Department at Goldsmiths – The psychology of belief in and use of complementary and alternative medicine 

                                (CAM)

12.45-13.10           Robin Harragin Hussey, District Manager of Christian Science Committee on Publication for UK and Ireland – Holiness and Healing in Christian Scientists’ Practice Today

13.10-14.10           Lunch

14.10-14.35           Suzanne Newcombe, Research Fellow at Inform, Lecturer in Religious Studies at the Open University – The Body in Contemporary Yoga and Ayurveda

14.35-15.00           Simon Dein, consultant psychiatrist in Essex UK, honorary clinical professor at Durham University – The End of Suffering:  Mysticism, Messianism and Medicine in Lubavitch

15.00-15.30           Tea

15.30-15.40           Website launch

15.40-16.40           Panel

We look forward to seeing you there! Feel free to circulate the attached pdf and help spread the word.

Inform@kcl.ac.uk

020 7848 1132

c/o Dept. of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College London

Virginia Woolf Building, 22 Kingsway, London WC2B 6LE.

Open-Access Book: “Glocal Religions”, ed by Victor Roudometof

Glocal Religions

Glocal Religions
Victor Roudometof (Ed.)

Pages: 152
Published: October 2018

The globalization of the world’s religions leads to a variety of fusions whereby local elements blend with global religions, leading to hybrid local-global or glocal religious forms. Glocal forms of religion provide a hitherto insufficiently explored research agenda with the potential of further growth in the future. This volume introduces the basic tenets of this research agenda and offers examples from around the globe. In the volume’s individual chapters, authors explore a diverse tapestry of such forms that cover cases from the Caribbean, Japan, Finland, Eastern Europe, US, Korea, Southeast Asia and Central America. Glocal forms of religious expression exist across diverse religious traditions. In this volume, religious traditions specifically explored include Buddhism, Hinduism, folk or traditional religions, Eastern Orthodox Christianity & Protestantism. The study of glocal religions involves a trans-disciplinary group of scholars and researchers. In this volume, contributions come from the fields of sociology, archaeology, anthropology, history and religious studies. This collection is an indispensable reader for scholars and students who wish to explore the dynamics of glocal religion in their part of the world

(This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue Glocal Religions that was published in Religions)

Download PDF

ISBN 978-3-03897-316-4 (Pbk); ISBN 978-3-03897-317-1 (PDF)
https://doi.org/10.3390/books978-3-03897-317-1 (registering DOI)
© 2018 MDPI; under CC BY-NC-ND license

CFP: Special journal issue on “Fashion/Religion Interfaces”

Call for papers for a special issue of the journal Religions

The complex interconnections between religious beliefs and fashion in clothing have been increasingly recognised by researchers, journalists and fashion producers. At the same time, fashion has begun to be a force that can shape religious communities and create debates, often of a controversial nature, within and between faiths. This special issue of Religions will explore these matters, focusing on sartorial fashion/religion interfaces in their diverse and multiple forms across the world today.

Fashion scholarship has long claimed that no-one exists fully outside of fashion systems. Yet many religious believers, especially those with more conservative mindsets, think that they are not influenced by secular and commercial fashion trends. So, who is right? At the same time, some religiously-oriented individuals may embrace fashion fully, while others might seek to balance fashionability with religious precepts and forms of conduct. Which sorts of balancing and mediating are occurring across the world today, among different religious groups in diverse locations? Which social and cultural forces and contexts shape these balancing acts? What are the differences between religiously-oriented dress practices in ‘home’ countries and in diasporic contexts? How are these matters bound up with globalization processes?

Most scholarly attention on fashion/religion interfaces has been on women’s dress practices, but what about men? In what ways do dynamics to do with sexualities, ethnicities, classes, disabilities, and other social factors impact on religiously-aware dress choices?

While the major scholarly and political focus has recently been on the relations between Islam and fashion, especially in terms of veiling, people with other religious affiliations must also make choices regarding fashion and dress issues. Papers focusing on any religion and belief system, and on any geographical (and/or virtual) location, are welcomed for this special edition. Articles comparing different religious and/or sectarian groups are also invited.

Contributions are sought from diverse disciplinary and inter-disciplinary backgrounds across the social sciences and humanities. Papers which report novel empirical findings, and innovate in theoretical and methodological terms, are particularly encouraged.

Special issue website with submission instructions: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/fashion

Submission deadline: 1 April 2019

Queries: Anna-Mari Almila a.almila@fashion.arts.ac.uk

Job Opening: Assistant Professor Position in Urban Sociology

Loyola University Chicago’s Department of Sociology seeks to fill an Assistant Professor tenure-stream position beginning in Fall 2019. We are especially interested in hiring a candidate whose primary expertise in urban sociology whose substantive interests contribute to areas of department need such as environmental sociology, race, or religion with a methodological specialty in ethnography.

Candidates must demonstrate a strong commitment to scholarly publication, grant-writing, and excellence in teaching.

Loyola is a nationally recognized research university in the Jesuit Catholic tradition. The Department of Sociology is located on Loyola’s attractive Lakeshore Campus, has a well-established doctoral program as well as a strong commitment to undergraduate teaching.

Inquiries should be addressed to Professor Rhys Williams, Chair of Search Committee, Dept. of Sociology, Loyola University Chicago, 1032 W. Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL, 60660 or rwilliams7@luc.edu.

Candidates must register their application and submit an electronic CV, a cover letter and statement of research interests, a statement of teaching philosophy, a teaching portfolio, and a writing sample at www.careers.luc.edu. Three letters of reference should be logged on to the website or sent as hard copy to the address above. Review of applications will begin November 10, 2018, continuing until the position is filled.

Call for Papers Christianity and the Rule of Law in Chinese Societies

Dates: March 29-31, 2019 (arriving on 28th and departing on April 1st)

Place: Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

The Center on Religion and Chinese Society at Purdue University invites papers that examine the relationship between Christianity and the rule of law in a Chinese society. We welcome both scholarly research papers of empirical, historical, or case studies, and personal reflection papers by Christian practitioners of the law (lawyers, judges, legislators, law enforcement agents, etc.).  A personal reflection paper by a law practitioner should reflect on one’s own conversion, Christian beliefs, and the impacts of faith on the practice of the law. A scholarly paper may address any of these topics below and the analysis may be at the micro, meso, or macro levels, but they must be on Christianity in one of the Chinese societies.  We particularly welcome papers on the following topics:

  • Christian roles in the making or remaking of the constitution in the ROC or PRC, or the Basic Law in Hong Kong or Macau
  • Christian roles in the development of the modern judiciary system
  • Christian roles in the making of some particular law or regulation
  • Christian roles in the defense of civil rights or human rights
  • Christian perceptions of the rule of law
  • Christian organizations and civil society
  • Christianity and the legal culture in Chinese societies
  • Christianity and public theology regarding the rule of law
  • Faith and law practice among Christian lawyers, legislators, judges, or enforcement agents (such as police)

Based on submitted abstracts, we will select 20 participants to make presentations. Hotel expenses of the presenters will be covered. A limited number of travel funds is available to subsidize transportation costs for those who apply.

Deadline to submit abstracts: October 31, 2018. The abstract should be between 500 and 1,000 words. Please include a brief c.v. and a note about whether or not applying for a travel subsidy and if so, how much. We will notify the selected participants of acceptance and travel funds by November 30, 2018.

Deadline to submit draft full paper: February 28, 2019. The paper should be no less than 5,000 words, with proper footnotes and referenced bibliography. We plan to publish a volume of the edited papers.

Please submit your abstract, c.v., note about travel subsidy, and full paper to Lily Szeto lszeto@purdue.edu