Job Opening: Post-Doc on Clerical Authority in Transhational Shii Islam

The Department of Theology and Religion seeks to appoint a Post-doctoral Research Fellow to work on the ERC-funded project ‘Creating an Alternative umma: Clerical Authority and Religio-political Mobilisation in Transnational Shii Islam (ALTERUMMA)’ project, led by Professor Oliver Scharbrodt. This interdisciplinary project investigates the transformation of Shii Islam in the Middle East and Europe since the 1950s. The research fellow will investigate the role of exilic and diasporic networks and their hubs (e.g. Kuwait, Damascus, London etc.) in the transnational mobilisation of Twelver Shii communities in the last 50 years.

The research fellow will have PhD on a topic related to thematic remit of the post (e.g. transnational religio-political activism in the contemporary Middle East), a very good command of Arabic, a high level analytical capability, as well as a demonstrated ability to work independently to the very highest levels of research excellence.

The Department of Theology and Religion has an outstanding international reputation in the study of all types of religion in the contemporary world, including inter-cultural theology, textual studies, pentecostal and charismatic studies, inter-religious relations, Islamic studies and Quaker studies. The department came second in the country in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 and is home to a number of important research groups and projects. As a member of Department, the research fellow will join a lively and flourishing department where they will enjoy opportunities for intellectual and other leadership in a collegiate and highly ambitious research community.

Further information about the project: http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/211385_en.html

This is a full-time post with duration of three years, with an anticipated start date of January 2019.

Full time starting salary is normally in the range £29,799 to £38,832. With potential progression once in post to £41,212 a year.

To download the details and submit an electronic application online please click on the Apply Online button below; please quote Job Reference 59423 in all enquiries. Alternatively information can be obtained from 0121 415 9000 or visit www.birmingham.ac.uk/jobs

Valuing excellence; sustaining investment

Informal enquiries should be directed to Oliver Scharbrodt at O.Scharbrodt@bham.ac.uk

Job Opening: Post-Doc on Clerical Authority in Transhational Shii Islam

The Department of Theology and Religion seeks to appoint a Post-doctoral Research Fellow to work on the ERC-funded project ‘Creating an Alternative umma: Clerical Authority and Religio-political Mobilisation in Transnational Shii Islam (ALTERUMMA)’ project, led by Professor Oliver Scharbrodt. This interdisciplinary project investigates the transformation of Shii Islam in the Middle East and Europe since the 1950s. The research fellow will investigate the role of exilic and diasporic networks and their hubs (e.g. Kuwait, Damascus, London etc.) in the transnational mobilisation of Twelver Shii communities in the last 50 years.

The research fellow will have PhD on a topic related to thematic remit of the post (e.g. transnational religio-political activism in the contemporary Middle East), a very good command of Arabic, a high level analytical capability, as well as a demonstrated ability to work independently to the very highest levels of research excellence.

The Department of Theology and Religion has an outstanding international reputation in the study of all types of religion in the contemporary world, including inter-cultural theology, textual studies, pentecostal and charismatic studies, inter-religious relations, Islamic studies and Quaker studies. The department came second in the country in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 and is home to a number of important research groups and projects. As a member of Department, the research fellow will join a lively and flourishing department where they will enjoy opportunities for intellectual and other leadership in a collegiate and highly ambitious research community.

Further information about the project: http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/211385_en.html

This is a full-time post with duration of three years, with an anticipated start date of January 2019.

Full time starting salary is normally in the range £29,799 to £38,832. With potential progression once in post to £41,212 a year.

To download the details and submit an electronic application online please click on the Apply Online button below; please quote Job Reference 59423 in all enquiries. Alternatively information can be obtained from 0121 415 9000 or visit www.birmingham.ac.uk/jobs

Valuing excellence; sustaining investment

Informal enquiries should be directed to Oliver Scharbrodt at O.Scharbrodt@bham.ac.uk

Call for Papers: “CURRENTS, PERSPECTIVES, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODOLOGIES FOR WORLD CHRISTIANITY”

An International, Interdisciplinary Conference organized by The World Christianity & History of Religions Program (Dept. of History & Ecumenics)
Princeton, New Jersey, USA

Description
Recent decades mark a watershed in World Christianity as an emerging academic field, its development into an interdisciplinary endeavor in particular. Reflection on the complexity of Christianity as a pluricultural, global phenomenon has been robust. As was highlighted by our 2018 conference, World Christianity as a field has been shaped in large part by its distinctive historiography and diverse methodologies. In 2019, our primary focus will be ethnographic. Accordingly, a wide range of questions about the nature and relevance of ethnography to the study of World Christianity will be explored, along with the difference ethnography makes (or could make) in providing granular accounts of local Christianities around the world. Likewise, in view of the fact that ethnographic research is being increasingly incorporated into studies of World Christianity at a time when concepts of ‘culture’ are rigorously contested and the loci of research extraordinarily diverse, what are the major challenges scholars face? The conference seeks to explore and reflect on past practices and new directions, drawing on case studies representative of the currents and eddies of Christianity in the majority world and beyond. In short, the conference seeks to inquire into the state of the field and provide a common interdisciplinary space for intellectual encounter and exchange.

  • Paper or panel proposals should be submitted via email to: worldchristianityconference@ptsem.edu
  • Proposal Deadline: September 30, 2018. Include: name, institutional affiliation and status, email address, contact phone, paper/panel title, and abstract (not to exceed 250 words).
  • Notification of successful proposals will be made by October 20, 2018.
  • Conference Registration: early-bird registration begins on October 25and ends on December 31. A higher fee will be charged thereafter.
  • Conference fees: (including refreshments, lunches, and the conference banquet)
    • $155.00 – early bird / $185.00 – late registration (faculty based in USA, Canada and Europe)
    • $100.00 – early bird / $120.00 – late registration (faculty based in the Global South, graduate students/retirees)
    • Accommodations: Limited availability (single/shared rooms) at Erdman Center on the Princeton Seminary campus. Other options for accommodation will be announced later.
  • Limited travel subsidies will be available for selected participants from the Global South with accepted paper/panel proposals.

Conveners: Afe Adogame, Raimundo Barreto, Richard F. Young

Call for Papers: “CURRENTS, PERSPECTIVES, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODOLOGIES FOR WORLD CHRISTIANITY”

An International, Interdisciplinary Conference organized by The World Christianity & History of Religions Program (Dept. of History & Ecumenics)
Princeton, New Jersey, USA

Description
Recent decades mark a watershed in World Christianity as an emerging academic field, its development into an interdisciplinary endeavor in particular. Reflection on the complexity of Christianity as a pluricultural, global phenomenon has been robust. As was highlighted by our 2018 conference, World Christianity as a field has been shaped in large part by its distinctive historiography and diverse methodologies. In 2019, our primary focus will be ethnographic. Accordingly, a wide range of questions about the nature and relevance of ethnography to the study of World Christianity will be explored, along with the difference ethnography makes (or could make) in providing granular accounts of local Christianities around the world. Likewise, in view of the fact that ethnographic research is being increasingly incorporated into studies of World Christianity at a time when concepts of ‘culture’ are rigorously contested and the loci of research extraordinarily diverse, what are the major challenges scholars face? The conference seeks to explore and reflect on past practices and new directions, drawing on case studies representative of the currents and eddies of Christianity in the majority world and beyond. In short, the conference seeks to inquire into the state of the field and provide a common interdisciplinary space for intellectual encounter and exchange.

  • Paper or panel proposals should be submitted via email to: worldchristianityconference@ptsem.edu
  • Proposal Deadline: September 30, 2018. Include: name, institutional affiliation and status, email address, contact phone, paper/panel title, and abstract (not to exceed 250 words).
  • Notification of successful proposals will be made by October 20, 2018.
  • Conference Registration: early-bird registration begins on October 25and ends on December 31. A higher fee will be charged thereafter.
  • Conference fees: (including refreshments, lunches, and the conference banquet)
    • $155.00 – early bird / $185.00 – late registration (faculty based in USA, Canada and Europe)
    • $100.00 – early bird / $120.00 – late registration (faculty based in the Global South, graduate students/retirees)
    • Accommodations: Limited availability (single/shared rooms) at Erdman Center on the Princeton Seminary campus. Other options for accommodation will be announced later.
  • Limited travel subsidies will be available for selected participants from the Global South with accepted paper/panel proposals.

Conveners: Afe Adogame, Raimundo Barreto, Richard F. Young

News and Events Reposted from AASR (May/June, 2018)

Here is a set of events, updates, and conferences/calls-for-papers reposted from the website of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion (https://www.aasr.org.au/mayjune/)

Events:

Updates:

Conferences / call for papers:

Call for Papers: Religion and Secularism on Campus: The Changing Dimensions of the University Experience

I am writing on behalf of the research team for the Re/presenting Islam on Campus – a three-year research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) that explores the complexities of lived experience, representation and perception of Islam on UK university and higher education campuses. As we near the end of the project we have organised a conference that aims to engage with cutting-edge research that explores diverse religious and non-religious identities on campus, how these are ‘lived’ on campus and how these are dealt with in university policy, practice, management and curricula.

Please can you share our CFP with your mailing list. Brief details for the conference are as follows:

Title: Religion and Secularism on Campus: The Changing Dimensions of the University Experience

Conference Dates: 6th and 7th September 2018

CFP deadline: 5pm on Friday, 6th July 2018

Submission process: Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words together with names and short biographies (150 words) of the presenter/s, institutional affiliation/s (if relevant), and contact details. Proposals should be sent to the project co-ordinator Kareem Darwish – kd27@soas.ac.uk. Academic enquiries should be sent to Dr Aisha Phoenix – ap85@soas.ac.uk

Full details: https://www.soas.ac.uk/representingislamoncampus/conference/

Dr Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor
Research Fellow in Faith and Peaceful Relations

Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations (CTPSR)

Coventry University

Call for Papers: Religion and Secularism on Campus: The Changing Dimensions of the University Experience

I am writing on behalf of the research team for the Re/presenting Islam on Campus – a three-year research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) that explores the complexities of lived experience, representation and perception of Islam on UK university and higher education campuses. As we near the end of the project we have organised a conference that aims to engage with cutting-edge research that explores diverse religious and non-religious identities on campus, how these are ‘lived’ on campus and how these are dealt with in university policy, practice, management and curricula.

Please can you share our CFP with your mailing list. Brief details for the conference are as follows:

Title: Religion and Secularism on Campus: The Changing Dimensions of the University Experience

Conference Dates: 6th and 7th September 2018

CFP deadline: 5pm on Friday, 6th July 2018

Submission process: Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words together with names and short biographies (150 words) of the presenter/s, institutional affiliation/s (if relevant), and contact details. Proposals should be sent to the project co-ordinator Kareem Darwish – kd27@soas.ac.uk. Academic enquiries should be sent to Dr Aisha Phoenix – ap85@soas.ac.uk

Full details: https://www.soas.ac.uk/representingislamoncampus/conference/

Dr Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor
Research Fellow in Faith and Peaceful Relations

Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations (CTPSR)

Coventry University

Summer School “Islam in Russia”.

During 20-26 of Ausgust the European University at Saint Petersburg organize the 4th Summer School “Islam in Russia”.

Working languages are Russian and English.

Please send your CV, Motivation letter and writing sample to ababushkina@eu.spb.ru  before 30 of May, 2018 г.

Here is the call in Russian:
Исследовательская лаборатория
«Ислам в России IV: городская культура и конвенции памяти»
Пенза, 20-26 августа 2018 г.

Организаторы:
Европейский университет в Санкт-Петербурге
Культурно-просветительский центр им. Х.Д. Тенишевой
Цель мероприятия – формирование исследовательских навыков у молодых
ученых, изучающих исламскую культуру в России и в ближнем зарубежье.
Наша исследовательская лаборатория ориентирована на начинающих
исследователей, делающих первые шаги в науке. Мы поможем с написанием
научных текстов, обсудим тонкости работы в «поле», будь то городская
среда или сельская местность. Все занятия в лаборатории интерактивны.
Каждый участник будет иметь возможность обсудить свой текст,
исследовательские планы, протестировать гипотезы и поработать с
коллегами над общим проектом. В рамках мероприятия запланированы квесты,
экскурсии, открытые лекции и мастер-классы в татарской слободе г. Пензы,
на городище Наровчат, а также в с. Средняя Елюзань.
Участниками школы могут стать:
студенты всех курсов гуманитарных направлений (бакалавры и магистры,
аспиранты первых курсов);
приветствуется знание английского и/или одного восточного языка.
За несколько недель до мероприятия участникам будут разосланы учебные
материалы.


Заявка на участие должна включать: CV, мотивационное письмо и письменную
работу (статья, эссе, дипломная работа и т.п.).
Принимающая сторона оплачивает проживание и питание участников.
Просьба присылать заявки на адрес ababushkina@eu.spb.ru до 30 мая 2018
г.
https://eu.spb.ru/announcements/18903-islam-v-rossii-iv

CFP: International Workshop “Religious Contacts in Early Modern Scandinavia 1500-1750”

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe of the Center for Religious Studies (CERES) invites papers to be presented at the international workshop “Religious Contacts in Early Modern Scandinavia 1500-1750” to be held 10-11 October 2018 in Bochum, Germany.

The workshop will bring together scholars of religious studies, history and cultural studies from the Northern countries as well as Baltic States, German-speaking countries and beyond to explore further the multitude of religious contacts on and around the Scandinavian Peninsula and the Baltic in Early Modern Age.

Among others we would like to compare case studies of different religious contacts and how they were executed by the actors involved. The focus will be rather on the situation and effect of religious contact than on a single religious group.

Examples to be discussed are among others:
– indigenous religions’ (Sami, Karelian, Inuits of Greenland) encounters with Lutheranism and/or Pietism,
– adaption and local alignments of, or resistance towards ideas derived from Protestant Reformation,
– encounters of Scandinavian colonists with the religious beliefs practiced by native peoples (of North America, Africa, Asia),
– early encounters between Protestantism and Orthodox Christianity in Finland and the Baltic,
– Jewish communities of and Jewish migration towards the Scandinavia peninsula in Early Modern Times,
– the spread of non-theistic Enlightenment ideas in Scandinavia and the Baltic before 1750.

Each participant is invited to present a paper in English.

The paper shall later be published in the Käte Hamburger Kolleg’s peer reviewed online journal Entangled Religions (https://er.ceres.rub.de/). All costs (travel expenses, accommodation, dining) will be covered by the Käte Hamburger Kolleg.

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe is an international research institution directly funded by the German government. It conducts research in the field of religious studies and history of religion that is dedicated to the formation and expansion of religions, the mutual permeation of religious traditions and their densifications into the complex figurations called ‘world religions.’ Find more information here: https://khk.ceres.rub.de/en/

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg welcomes applications including an abstract on the intended paper to be presented (max 1,500 words) and a short notice about the academic affiliation of the applicant. Applications should be submitted electronically to ulf.plessentin@rub.de no later than June 15, 2018.


New Pew Study Released

Being Christian in Western Europe

The majority of Europe’s Christians are non-practicing, but they differ from religiously unaffiliated people in their attitudes toward Muslims and immigrants, views on God, and opinions about religion’s role in society

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 29, 2018) – Western Europe, where Protestant Christianity originated and Catholicism has been based for most of its history, has become one of the world’s most secular regions. Although the vast majority of adults say they were baptized, today many do not describe themselves as Christians. Some say they gradually drifted away from religion, stopped believing in religious teachings, or were alienated by scandals or church positions on social issues, according to a major new Pew Research Center survey of religious beliefs and practices in Western Europe.

Yet most adults surveyed still do consider themselves Christians, even if they seldom go to church. The survey shows that non-practicing Christians (defined, for the purposes of this report, as people who identify as Christians, but attend church services no more than a few times per year) make up the biggest share of the population across the region. In every country except Italy, they are more numerous than church-attending Christians (those who go to religious services at least once a month). Non-practicing Christians also outnumber the religiously unaffiliated population (people who identify as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular,” sometimes called the “nones”) in most of the countries surveyed.

The Pew Research Center study – which involved more than 24,000 telephone interviews with randomly selected adults, including nearly 12,000 non-practicing Christians – finds that Christian identity remains a meaningful marker in Western Europe, even among those who seldom go to church. It is not just a “nominal” identity devoid of practical importance. On the contrary, the religious, political and cultural views of non-practicing Christians often differ from those of church-attending Christians and religiously unaffiliated adults.

Indeed, Christian identity in Western Europe is associated with higher levels of negative sentiment toward immigrants and religious minorities. On balance, self-identified Christians – whether they attend church or not – are more likely than religiously unaffiliated people to express negative views of immigrants, as well as of Muslims and Jews.

For example, in the UK, 45% of church-attending Christians say Islam is fundamentally incompatible with British values and culture, as do roughly the same share of non-practicing Christians (47%). But among religiously unaffiliated adults, fewer (30%) say Islam is fundamentally incompatible with their country’s values. There is a similar pattern across the region on whether there should be restrictions on Muslim women’s dress in public, with Christians more likely than “nones” to say Muslim women should not be allowed to wear any religious clothing in public.

Churchgoing Christians, non-practicing Christians and religiously unaffiliated people also differ in their attitudes on nationalism. Non-practicing Christians are less likely than church-attending Christians to express nationalist views. Still, they are more likely than “nones” to say that their culture is superior to others and that it is necessary to have the country’s ancestry to share the national identity (e.g., one must have Spanish family background to be truly Spanish).

For instance, in France, nearly three-quarters of church-attending Christians (72%) say it is important to have French ancestry to be “truly French.” Among non-practicing Christians, 52% take this position, but this is still higher than the 43% of religiously unaffiliated French adults who say having French family background is important in order to be truly French.

The survey, which was conducted following a surge of immigration to Europe from Muslim-majority countries, asked many other questions about national identity, religious pluralism and immigration.

Most Western Europeans say they are willing to accept Muslims and Jews in their neighborhoods and in their families, and most reject negative statements about these groups. And, on balance, more respondents say immigrants are honest and hardworking than say the opposite.

But a clear and consistent pattern emerges: Both church-attending and non-practicing Christians are more likely than religiously unaffiliated adults in Western Europe to voice anti-immigrant, anti-minority and nationalist views.

There also are other factors beyond religious identity that are closely connected with these positions. For example, higher education and personally knowing someone who is Muslim tend to go hand in hand with more openness to immigration and religious minorities. And identifying with the political right is strongly linked to anti-immigration stances. Still, even after using statistical techniques to control for these factors (and several others, including age and gender) Western Europeans who identify as Christian are more likely than those who have no religious affiliation to express negative feelings about immigrants and religious minorities.

Other key ways in which non-practicing Christians, churchgoing Christians and religiously unaffiliated adults in the region differ include:

• Although many non-practicing Christians say they do not believe in God “as described in the Bible,” they do tend to believe in some other higher power or spiritual force. By contrast, most church-attending Christians say they believe in the biblical depiction of God. And a clear majority of religiously unaffiliated adults do not believe in any type of higher power or spiritual force in the universe.

• Non-practicing Christians tend to express more positive than negative views toward churches and religious organizations, saying they serve society by helping the poor and bringing communities together. Their attitudes toward religious institutions are not quite as favorable as those of church-attending Christians, but they are more likely than religiously unaffiliated Europeans to say churches and other religious organizations contribute positively to society.

• The vast majority of non-practicing Christians, like the vast majority of the unaffiliated in Western Europe, favor legal abortion and same-sex marriage. Church-attending Christians are more conservative on these issues, though even among churchgoing Christians, there is substantial support – and in several countries, majority support – for legal abortion and same-sex marriage.

• Nearly all churchgoing Christians who are parents or guardians of minor children (those under 18) say they are raising those children in the Christian faith. Among non-practicing Christians, somewhat fewer – though still the overwhelming majority – say they are bringing up their children as Christians. By contrast, religiously unaffiliated parents generally are raising their children with no religion.

These are among the key findings of the new Pew Research Center survey. The study, funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John Templeton Foundation, is part of a larger effort by Pew Research Center to understand religious change and its impact on societies around the world.

Read the report: http://www.pewforum.org/2018/05/29/being-christian-in-western-europe/

For more information, or to arrange an interview with the study’s lead authors, Associate Director of Research Neha Sahgal and Director of Religion Research Alan Cooperman, please contact Anna Schiller at (+1) 202-419-4372 or aschiller@pewresearch.org.

###

Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. It does not take policy positions. The Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. Subscribe to our daily and weekly email newsletters or follow us on ourFact Tank blog.