Call For Book Proposals: Religion and the Social Order

A Book Series from Brill Academic Publishers and the Association for the Sociology of Religion

We are now seeking book proposals for Religion And The Social Order book series. The series was initiated by the Association for the Sociology of Religion (ASR), which is an international scholarly association that seeks to advance theory and research in the sociology of religion. The aim of Religion and the Social Order (RESO) is to publish edited volumes or single topic monographs that center around a particular set of current interests within the sociology of religion. It specifically aims to advance theory and research within this field of study. The series seeks to publish at least one volume per year. Under the auspices of the Association for the Sociology of Religion, RESO has been published by Brill since 2004 and under the General Editorship of Inger Furseth since 2016.  Please view the full Call For Proposals and find out more about the Manuscript Proposal Guidelines.

Call for Papers: “Approaching Ethnoheterogenesis. Membership, Ethnicity, and Social Change in Contemporary Societies”.

 Organization: Prof. Dr. Mathias Bös, PD Dr. Nina Clara Tiesler, and Deborah Sielert. Institute of Sociology, Leibniz University of Hannover (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Soziologie – Sektion Migration und ethnische Minderheiten)

Email to: n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de

Venue: Hannover Leibnizhaus

Date: Thursday and Friday, December 12th and 13th, 2017   

The study of societal change and ethnic relations has been a core pursuit in Sociology, both in the past and in the present, especially – though not exclusively – in historical contexts marked by heightened migration. This conference aims to refine the theoretical understanding of social and cultural processes regarding the formation of ethnicities and ethnic diversity (Yancey et al 1976, Bös 2010).

The specific contribution of this conference goes to the research context of migrants and migrant descendants; wherein conceptual debates on self-perceptions, modes of belonging, group formation, and collective subjectivities continue to be at the core of theoretical considerations (Cohen 1974, Glazer and Moynihan 1975, Banton 2008). Importantly, the conference also goes beyond this context: studying the genesis and continuously shifting social forms of ethnicities is heuristically important in that it can help us clarify processes of socio-, cultural-, and political change in society at large (Bell 1975, Bös 2011, Banton 2011).

Researching the emergence of ethnicities has a long tradition in diverse social sciences and in the humanities. The term ethnogenesis originally described constitutive processes of ethnic groups, their possible fissions, de-ethnization, expansion, or new formations over time and space (Singer 1962, Voss 2008). From the mid-1970s onward, in American Sociology, ethnogenesis was also used to grasp societal assimilation, integration, and change caused by ethnic diversification (Greeley 1974), as such describing socio-cultural change among both minority and majority groupings and in society at large.

However, it appears that current analytical concepts and frameworks to describe the genesis of ethnicities and societal change through ethnic diversification are too limited to grasp these complex and multi-dimensional formative processes (Barth 1969, Fardon 1987, Thompson 2011, Bös 2015). These concepts (e.g., assimilation, identity, integration, diversity, inclusion, multi-ethnic societies, etc.) often represent normative self-descriptions by civil society rather than analytical categories of heuristic value. Therefore, we propose the concept of Ethnoheterogenesis (EHG) as a starting point to discuss multidimensional models of specific forms of societization (Vergesellschaftung), which involve ethnic framing and affiliations of individuals, groupings, and macro groups (Tiesler 2015). Rather than reducing such formative processes to linear models, new concepts such a Ethnoheterogenesis explicitly address the dialectic of homogenization and heterogenization in the genesis of ethnicities, as well as the normality of de-ethnization and multiple options regarding ethnic affiliation (Waters 1990).

The aim of the conference is to further develop EHG or other new alternatives as analytical categories for processes of socio-cultural change in complex settings of transnationally constituted societies that can be coined ethnoheterogeneous (Claussen 2013). We invite international scholars for a critical discussion in favor of further theorizing. Conceptual papers and empirical studies referring to the following themes are welcome:

  1. What changes in ethnic framing, ethnic affiliation, and multiplicity of memberships/belongings can be observed in current times of heightened mobility and how can they be analyzed?

What can be said about ethnicity as a resource for individualization, collectivization, and community building or potential counterhegemonic cultures?

– What forms of “past presencing” can be reconstructed in the processes of ethno(hetero)genesis?

– What does the analysis of the genesis and changes of ethnic framing and multiplicity of memberships add to the broader field of sociology (i.e., Sociology of Migration, Global Sociology, and Sociology of the Nation State)?

  1. How are the processes of (de-)ethnization interwoven with social inequality (economic, legal, political, etc.)?

– What role do institutions such as the family, neighborhoods, work, or communities play in this context?

– How should we think about the genesis of ethnicities in the intersection with and relation to different categories of social inequality, and most importantly race, gender, class, and/or generation?

  1. How does ethnicity function as an element in the structuring of (world) society?

– What can be said about the (changing) role of the nation in the emergence of ethnicities and membership roles?

What is the role of spatial configuration, such as transnationalism, in the genesis of ethnicities?

What insights can be gained from related fields such as diaspora or transnational studies?

Keynote Speakers:      

·        Nadje Al-Ali, Centre for Gender Studies, SOAS

·        Thomas D. Hall, Prof. Emeritus, Department of History, DePauw University

 

We are looking forward to proposals for lectures and/or workshops. The abstracts (one page long) should include the question, empirical/theoretical background, hypothesis, and brief personal details. Please send your proposals or abstracts to n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de
ABSTRACTS DUE: June 15, 2017

Call for Papers: “Approaching Ethnoheterogenesis. Membership, Ethnicity, and Social Change in Contemporary Societies”.

 Organization: Prof. Dr. Mathias Bös, PD Dr. Nina Clara Tiesler, and Deborah Sielert. Institute of Sociology, Leibniz University of Hannover (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Soziologie – Sektion Migration und ethnische Minderheiten)

Email to: n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de

Venue: Hannover Leibnizhaus

Date: Thursday and Friday, December 12th and 13th, 2017   

The study of societal change and ethnic relations has been a core pursuit in Sociology, both in the past and in the present, especially – though not exclusively – in historical contexts marked by heightened migration. This conference aims to refine the theoretical understanding of social and cultural processes regarding the formation of ethnicities and ethnic diversity (Yancey et al 1976, Bös 2010).

The specific contribution of this conference goes to the research context of migrants and migrant descendants; wherein conceptual debates on self-perceptions, modes of belonging, group formation, and collective subjectivities continue to be at the core of theoretical considerations (Cohen 1974, Glazer and Moynihan 1975, Banton 2008). Importantly, the conference also goes beyond this context: studying the genesis and continuously shifting social forms of ethnicities is heuristically important in that it can help us clarify processes of socio-, cultural-, and political change in society at large (Bell 1975, Bös 2011, Banton 2011).

Researching the emergence of ethnicities has a long tradition in diverse social sciences and in the humanities. The term ethnogenesis originally described constitutive processes of ethnic groups, their possible fissions, de-ethnization, expansion, or new formations over time and space (Singer 1962, Voss 2008). From the mid-1970s onward, in American Sociology, ethnogenesis was also used to grasp societal assimilation, integration, and change caused by ethnic diversification (Greeley 1974), as such describing socio-cultural change among both minority and majority groupings and in society at large.

However, it appears that current analytical concepts and frameworks to describe the genesis of ethnicities and societal change through ethnic diversification are too limited to grasp these complex and multi-dimensional formative processes (Barth 1969, Fardon 1987, Thompson 2011, Bös 2015). These concepts (e.g., assimilation, identity, integration, diversity, inclusion, multi-ethnic societies, etc.) often represent normative self-descriptions by civil society rather than analytical categories of heuristic value. Therefore, we propose the concept of Ethnoheterogenesis (EHG) as a starting point to discuss multidimensional models of specific forms of societization (Vergesellschaftung), which involve ethnic framing and affiliations of individuals, groupings, and macro groups (Tiesler 2015). Rather than reducing such formative processes to linear models, new concepts such a Ethnoheterogenesis explicitly address the dialectic of homogenization and heterogenization in the genesis of ethnicities, as well as the normality of de-ethnization and multiple options regarding ethnic affiliation (Waters 1990).

The aim of the conference is to further develop EHG or other new alternatives as analytical categories for processes of socio-cultural change in complex settings of transnationally constituted societies that can be coined ethnoheterogeneous (Claussen 2013). We invite international scholars for a critical discussion in favor of further theorizing. Conceptual papers and empirical studies referring to the following themes are welcome:

  1. What changes in ethnic framing, ethnic affiliation, and multiplicity of memberships/belongings can be observed in current times of heightened mobility and how can they be analyzed?

What can be said about ethnicity as a resource for individualization, collectivization, and community building or potential counterhegemonic cultures?

– What forms of “past presencing” can be reconstructed in the processes of ethno(hetero)genesis?

– What does the analysis of the genesis and changes of ethnic framing and multiplicity of memberships add to the broader field of sociology (i.e., Sociology of Migration, Global Sociology, and Sociology of the Nation State)?

  1. How are the processes of (de-)ethnization interwoven with social inequality (economic, legal, political, etc.)?

– What role do institutions such as the family, neighborhoods, work, or communities play in this context?

– How should we think about the genesis of ethnicities in the intersection with and relation to different categories of social inequality, and most importantly race, gender, class, and/or generation?

  1. How does ethnicity function as an element in the structuring of (world) society?

– What can be said about the (changing) role of the nation in the emergence of ethnicities and membership roles?

What is the role of spatial configuration, such as transnationalism, in the genesis of ethnicities?

What insights can be gained from related fields such as diaspora or transnational studies?

Keynote Speakers:      

·        Nadje Al-Ali, Centre for Gender Studies, SOAS

·        Thomas D. Hall, Prof. Emeritus, Department of History, DePauw University

 

We are looking forward to proposals for lectures and/or workshops. The abstracts (one page long) should include the question, empirical/theoretical background, hypothesis, and brief personal details. Please send your proposals or abstracts to n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de
ABSTRACTS DUE: June 15, 2017

Call for Manuscripts: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion

Volume 10: Interreligious Dialogue:
From Religion to Geopolitics
Forthcoming 2019

Edited by:
Giuseppe Giordan (University of Padua, Italy) and
Andrew P. Lynch (University of Sydney, Australia)

The topic of interreligious dialogue is of critical importance at a
time of increasing geopolitical tension.  The urgency for developing
better analytical tools for understanding interreligious dialogue is
underscored by widespread concerns about religion and violence, and
the security culture that this has given rise to in a number of nation
states.  Furthermore, globalization, technological developments, mass
migration, and recent political upheavals and the narratives of
the exclusion that has been associated with them, highlights the need for
greater levels of communication between religious groups.  This volume
seeks to investigate interreligious dialogue as a necessary component
of global affairs in post-secular times, and in multi-faith societies
facing increasing levels of cultural pluralism.

To explore these issues we propose to include articles on the
following themes, from the perspective of a range of different
religions:

  1. Changing viewpoints and theories in the study of interreligious dialogue
  2. Interreligious dialogue and politics in the context of globalization
  3. Interreligious dialogue and debates about secularism and post-secularism
  4. Interreligious dialogue in the context of social diversity,
    cultural pluralism, and multi-faith societies
  5. Interreligious dialogue and emerging information technologies
  6. Interreligious dialogue in an age of terrorism
  7. Interreligious dialogue and migration

Please send all proposals (300 words) to andrew.lynch@sydney.edu.au

Deadlines:
Submission of proposals: July 30, 2017
Notification of acceptance: September 30, 2017
Completed manuscripts (7,000 words): June 30, 2018

Call for Manuscripts: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion

Volume 10: Interreligious Dialogue:
From Religion to Geopolitics
Forthcoming 2019

Edited by:
Giuseppe Giordan (University of Padua, Italy) and
Andrew P. Lynch (University of Sydney, Australia)

The topic of interreligious dialogue is of critical importance at a
time of increasing geopolitical tension.  The urgency for developing
better analytical tools for understanding interreligious dialogue is
underscored by widespread concerns about religion and violence, and
the security culture that this has given rise to in a number of nation
states.  Furthermore, globalization, technological developments, mass
migration, and recent political upheavals and the narratives of
the exclusion that has been associated with them, highlights the need for
greater levels of communication between religious groups.  This volume
seeks to investigate interreligious dialogue as a necessary component
of global affairs in post-secular times, and in multi-faith societies
facing increasing levels of cultural pluralism.

To explore these issues we propose to include articles on the
following themes, from the perspective of a range of different
religions:

  1. Changing viewpoints and theories in the study of interreligious dialogue
  2. Interreligious dialogue and politics in the context of globalization
  3. Interreligious dialogue and debates about secularism and post-secularism
  4. Interreligious dialogue in the context of social diversity,
    cultural pluralism, and multi-faith societies
  5. Interreligious dialogue and emerging information technologies
  6. Interreligious dialogue in an age of terrorism
  7. Interreligious dialogue and migration

Please send all proposals (300 words) to andrew.lynch@sydney.edu.au

Deadlines:
Submission of proposals: July 30, 2017
Notification of acceptance: September 30, 2017
Completed manuscripts (7,000 words): June 30, 2018

Call for Papers: Religion and the Social Order

Call For Book Proposals
Religion and the Social Order
A Book Series from Brill Academic Publishers and the Association for the Sociology of Religion

We are now seeking book proposals for Religion And The Social Order book series. The series was initiated by the Association for the Sociology of Religion (ASR), which is an international scholarly association that seeks to advance theory and research in the sociology of religion. The aim of Religion and the Social Order (RESO) is to publish edited volumes or single topic monographs that center around a particular set of current interests within the sociology of religion. It specifically aims to advance theory and research within this field of study. The series seeks to publish at least one volume per year. Under the auspices of the Association for the Sociology of Religion, RESO has been published by Brill since 2004 and under the General Editorship of Inger Furseth since 2016.  Please view the full Call For Proposals and find out more about the Manuscript Proposal Guidelines.

General Editor:
Inger Furseth, University of Oslo, Norway

Editorial Committee:
Lori Beaman, University of Ottawa, Canada
Michele Dillon, University of New Hampshire, USA
David Herbert, Kingston University London, UK
Juan Marco Vaggione, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina
Rhys Williams, Loyola University, Chicago, USA
Melissa M. Wilcox, University of California at Riverside, USA

Visit the Series on the Brill Website

“Sociology of Islam” journal enters its 4th year

Greetings from Istanbul. 2017 will be our 4th year and we appreciate your support and activity as part of the mailing list. So far, we have published 16 issues including three ‘special issues.’ We are happy to accept articles related with the Sociology of Islam and Sociology of the Middle East which are related directly with the topics of inequality, social movements, political sociology, religion, nationalism and ethnicity, modernity, work and labor, criminology, aging, environment, health, deviance, sexuality, education, and social change. For your submission, we accept articles from 8000–12.000 words in length. If you have any questions or concerns please do not hesitate to contact me, Gary Wood or other members of the editorial board. Additionally, we are open to special issue proposals, please email your ideas to us!

You can submit your article to the following website: http://www.editorialmanager.com/SOI/default.aspx

or send it to us for a prescreening process.   

Please remember that this is not a religious studies journal! All submissions must be related with the themes of Sociology of Islam and the Middle East.      

Our special issues can be found at the following website pages:

The Gülen Movement (Volume 1, Issue 3-4, 2014 )

A Guest editor: Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland.

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/1/3-4

Contemporary Social Movements in the Middle East and Beyond, 2014 (Volume 2,  Issue 3-4, 2014)

A Guest editor: Mojtaba Mahdavi, University of Alberta

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/2/3-4

China, Islam and Middle East (Volume 4, Issue 1-2, 2016)

A Guest editor: Tugrul Keskin, Shanghai University

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/4/1-2

SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM:

http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/sociology-islam

Editorial Board

Editors-in-Chief
Gary Wood, Virginia Tech
Tugrul Keskin, Shanghai University
Assistant Editors
Sara Swetzoff, Howard University
Michael McCall, American University of Beirut
Associate Editors
Rachel Rinaldo, University of Colorado-Boulder
Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland
Isabel David, University of Lisbon
Mark Gould, Haverford College
Sari Hanafi, American University of Beirut
Sean Foley, Middle Tennessee State University
Book Reviews Editor:
Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland

Symposium” “Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities in Australia”

I’d like to invite you to submit abstracts to the symposium Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities in Australia, which I am convening with Mark Hutchinson and Kathleen Openshaw at the Religion and Society Research Cluster, Western Sydney University.

  • Date: 11-12 of August, 2017
  • Abstract submission date: Friday, January 13, 2017
  • Submit to: Kathleen Openshaw   k.openshaw@westernsydney.edu
  • Keynote speaker: Prof Paul Freston (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities (PCC) have grown significantly worldwide, particularly in the Global South. In Australia, the latest National Church Life Survey has shown they have overtaken Anglicans as the second largest religious group by attendance, behind the Catholic Church. Data also points to PCC adherents’ higher educational attainment, now higher than among Anglicans. Moreover, Australia’s location in Oceania, the ‘most Christian part of the world,’ means that many migrants from the region are Pentecostal and Charismatic.

On the other hand, Australian megachurches such as Hillsong, Planetshakers, COC and C3 have been influencing churches in many parts of the world, including the USA and even Brazil, the largest Pentecostal country in the world. In this symposium we are interested in teasing out the remarkable growth of PCC in Australia, a country considered largely secular. We are hoping to discuss the following questions: How have PCC grown from their humble origins to become such a force in Australia? What makes Australians join a PCC movement? What is the relationship between PCC and Australian politics? How do migrants and refugees negotiate identity, belonging and home-making in Australia through Pentecostal/Charismatic churches? How can we account for the remarkable rise of PCC in Australia in a post-secular world? How do PCC expand in and out of the country?

This call for papers seeks authors on topics which include the connections between Australian PCC and:

  • Historical developments
  • Australian politics
  • Media, music, Information Communication Technologies
  • Branding and marketing
  • Late modernity and global capitalism
  • Material culture
  • Aesthetics and embodied practices
  • Lived experiences
  • Social justice movements/activism
  • Chaplaincy in schools
  • Aboriginal Peoples
  • Migration
  • Gender and class
  • Youth and celebrity cultures

The conveners are planning to publish chapters in an edited volume after the symposium.

Associate Professor Cristina Rocha
ARC Future Fellow
Director of Religion and Society Research Cluster
Western Sydney University
Editor: Journal of Global Buddhism
Editor: Religion in the Americas series, Brill
http://www.uws.edu.au/religion_and_society/people/researchers/dr_cristina_rocha

Call for Papers: Religion and the Rise of Populism: Migration, Radicalism and New Nationalisms

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/pgas/crss-call-for-papers-religion-rise-populism

The editors of the journal Religion, State and Society are pleased to invite contributions to a special issue, slated for publication in early 2018. The special issue will investigate the roles of religion in recent trends towards populist politics, in particular as manifested in public reactions to migration, the rise of new nationalisms, and the increasing prominence of radicalism.

Growing evidence suggests that these developments are taking centre stage throughout the world, set in a wider context of global political and economic uncertainty. It can also be observed that religion plays an important role in each of these three issues, often in ways that interconnect them. For example, the actions of the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria have exacerbated an already worrisome global migration crisis, while also heightening concerns about violent radicalism.  From France to the Philippines, public anxieties surrounding ISIS and domestic ‘radicalisation’ have become frequent motifs in populist rhetoric that links them with increasing flows of migrants as representative of threats to social security and the economic wellbeing of local populations.

Other examples of contemporary issues in which religion is implicated in populist politics and linked to migration, new nationalisms, and radicalism include: the emphasis on ‘Hindu values’ in the politics of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party in India; the Christian or anti-Muslim rhetoric of American presidential candidates; the UK Brexit campaigners’ use of the prospective membership of ‘Muslim’ Turkey in the EU; the deepening significance of ‘traditionalist’ and pro-Orthodox rhetoric in Russia’s domestic and international politics; and the increasing prominence of religion-based identity politics in Poland, Hungary, and Croatia.

This special issue will seek to probe the various roles of religion in these interlinked issues and across comparative cases. There is an urgent need for considered academic analysis to discern how the rise of populism is connected to religion and the issues of migration, radicalism, and new nationalisms, to elucidate the broader empirical and theoretical implications for our understandings of religion, state, and society.

Areas of investigation can include but are by no means limited to:

  • Religious dimensions of populism in national contexts, including comparative perspectives
  • The migration crisis and its implications for religion-based identity politics in European societies and beyond
  • The ‘crisis’ of the European Union following the Brexit referendum, and its broader implications with relevance to religion
  • Religious dimensions of radicalism: discourses, movements, and politics
  • Religiously-based conservative and traditionalist movements in Europe, the United States, India, Russia, or other parts of the world, including comparative studies
  • Fringe and far-right political and vigilante groups and movements, and their politics of religion
  • Religious dimensions of the securitisation of borders and the ‘othering’ of excluded groups
  • Theoretical, legal, or discourse-based work on the role of religious, such as ‘Christian’ or ‘Hindu’, affinities in constructions of national identity and the operation of national institutions

This special issue of Religion, State and Society is planned for publication in the first half of 2018. The editors have been invited by Routledge to also consider republication of the contributions as a book.

Application Process

Please send completed papers of 6,000-8,000 words by 15 August 2017. To submit a paper, please register for an account and follow the submission instructions at the journal’s online submission portal: http://www.edmgr.com/crss

Before submitting your manuscript please read carefully the journal’s submission instructions, available on the RSS main website under the ‘Instructions for Authors’ page (http://www.tandfonline.com/crss). All manuscripts will go through the normal peer review process.

Questions related to the theme and potential ideas for papers can be discussed with the editors:
Dr Daniel Nilsson DeHanas (daniel.dehanas@kcl.ac.uk)
Dr Marat Shterin (marat.shterin@kcl.ac.uk)

Call for Papers: Special Issue: Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Invitation to the Special Issue of Central and Eastern European Migration Review

Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Guest editors:

Katarzyna Leszczyńska, Faculty of Humanities, AGH University of Science and Technology

Sylwia Urbańska, Institute of Sociology, University of Warsaw

Katarzyna Zielińska, Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University

Despite the dynamic development of migration studies in recent decades, the interplay between gender and religion in their impact on migratory processes and related social phenomenahas not so far become a subject of systematic and in-depth research and reflection.This omission can be traced back to the fact that both gender and religion were ‘latecomers’ to the field of migration studies, because they became a subject of systematic analysis only in the 1980s.At the same time, questions relating to interactions between gender, religion and migration are becoming more and more pressing in the light of growing glocalisation and transnationalism, and dramatically intensifying migratory processes, especially migration of persons seeking refugee status from wars and social conflicts.The existing gap in research results in a lack of systematic knowledge of how gendered religious identities and practices as well as religious culture, institutions, and organisationsshape migration flows, motivations,migrant diversified activitiesand migration regimes.

The proposed Special Issue aims at filling this gap in the existing research. Moreover, due to the peculiarity of the CEE region,we regard the question ofthe interplay between gender, religion and migration as being particularly interesting. The culture of most CEE countries, despite post-socialist socioeconomic and political transformations and social change resulting from mass migration, can still be characterised as homogeneous and attached to traditional, conservative gendered values. This conservative shade of the culture is often further strengthened by the influential public role of religion (e.g. the high status and power of the Roman Catholic Church in Poland or Orthodox Church in Romania) and by the low level of secularisation (i.e. prevalence of religious practices and beliefs, support for conservative social values).

The Special Issue will focus on the following topics and general research questions:

  1. How does the interplay between gender and religion influence the migratory experience? How doesreligion shapethe individual and collective experience of migrants, in particular, with regard to the formation of their genderedsocial, class, ethnic, civic and work identities and practices? How do various religious traditions construct and reproduce the gender rules in the symbolic, institutional and experiential dimensions of migration?
  2. How does the activity of religious organisationsand their personnel contribute to creation of various forms of capital supporting (or inhibiting) migrants’ adaptation, integration, andmulticultural identity? How do religious organisations mediate migrants’ adaptation to their new social conditions? How do religious organisationsform bonds and networks of relationships between the cultures of the country of origin and country of settlement?

  3. How (if at all) do the gender patterns and identities embedded in religious organisations transform in various migratory contexts? In which directions do the institutional rules concerning the place of men and women characteristic of conservative gender orders changeas a consequence of migrationinvolvingencounters with multicultural and secular socio-cultural environments as well as with more conservative ones?

We also invite contributions focusing on other topics related to the interaction between religion, gender and migration, because the main purpose of this Special Issue is to showthe recent developments in research on this broad topic in the context of migration to and from theCEE region.

Submission guidelines and related deadlines

10 January 2017 –submission of abstracts

30 March 2017 – submission of articles

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be sent to: ceemr@uw.edu.pl.

Please note that each article will be subject to a double-blind peer review process and positive reviews will be a condition for the publication.

Guidelines for submission can be found at:www.ceemr.uw.edu.pl/sites/default/files/Instructions_to_authors_5.07.2013_final_2.pdf.

For more information on the Central and Eastern European Migration Review,please visitwww.ceemr.uw.edu.pl.