“Sociology of Islam” journal enters its 4th year

Greetings from Istanbul. 2017 will be our 4th year and we appreciate your support and activity as part of the mailing list. So far, we have published 16 issues including three ‘special issues.’ We are happy to accept articles related with the Sociology of Islam and Sociology of the Middle East which are related directly with the topics of inequality, social movements, political sociology, religion, nationalism and ethnicity, modernity, work and labor, criminology, aging, environment, health, deviance, sexuality, education, and social change. For your submission, we accept articles from 8000–12.000 words in length. If you have any questions or concerns please do not hesitate to contact me, Gary Wood or other members of the editorial board. Additionally, we are open to special issue proposals, please email your ideas to us!

You can submit your article to the following website: http://www.editorialmanager.com/SOI/default.aspx

or send it to us for a prescreening process.   

Please remember that this is not a religious studies journal! All submissions must be related with the themes of Sociology of Islam and the Middle East.      

Our special issues can be found at the following website pages:

The Gülen Movement (Volume 1, Issue 3-4, 2014 )

A Guest editor: Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland.

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/1/3-4

Contemporary Social Movements in the Middle East and Beyond, 2014 (Volume 2,  Issue 3-4, 2014)

A Guest editor: Mojtaba Mahdavi, University of Alberta

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/2/3-4

China, Islam and Middle East (Volume 4, Issue 1-2, 2016)

A Guest editor: Tugrul Keskin, Shanghai University

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/4/1-2

SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM:

http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/sociology-islam

Editorial Board

Editors-in-Chief
Gary Wood, Virginia Tech
Tugrul Keskin, Shanghai University
Assistant Editors
Sara Swetzoff, Howard University
Michael McCall, American University of Beirut
Associate Editors
Rachel Rinaldo, University of Colorado-Boulder
Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland
Isabel David, University of Lisbon
Mark Gould, Haverford College
Sari Hanafi, American University of Beirut
Sean Foley, Middle Tennessee State University
Book Reviews Editor:
Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland

Symposium” “Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities in Australia”

I’d like to invite you to submit abstracts to the symposium Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities in Australia, which I am convening with Mark Hutchinson and Kathleen Openshaw at the Religion and Society Research Cluster, Western Sydney University.

  • Date: 11-12 of August, 2017
  • Abstract submission date: Friday, January 13, 2017
  • Submit to: Kathleen Openshaw   k.openshaw@westernsydney.edu
  • Keynote speaker: Prof Paul Freston (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities (PCC) have grown significantly worldwide, particularly in the Global South. In Australia, the latest National Church Life Survey has shown they have overtaken Anglicans as the second largest religious group by attendance, behind the Catholic Church. Data also points to PCC adherents’ higher educational attainment, now higher than among Anglicans. Moreover, Australia’s location in Oceania, the ‘most Christian part of the world,’ means that many migrants from the region are Pentecostal and Charismatic.

On the other hand, Australian megachurches such as Hillsong, Planetshakers, COC and C3 have been influencing churches in many parts of the world, including the USA and even Brazil, the largest Pentecostal country in the world. In this symposium we are interested in teasing out the remarkable growth of PCC in Australia, a country considered largely secular. We are hoping to discuss the following questions: How have PCC grown from their humble origins to become such a force in Australia? What makes Australians join a PCC movement? What is the relationship between PCC and Australian politics? How do migrants and refugees negotiate identity, belonging and home-making in Australia through Pentecostal/Charismatic churches? How can we account for the remarkable rise of PCC in Australia in a post-secular world? How do PCC expand in and out of the country?

This call for papers seeks authors on topics which include the connections between Australian PCC and:

  • Historical developments
  • Australian politics
  • Media, music, Information Communication Technologies
  • Branding and marketing
  • Late modernity and global capitalism
  • Material culture
  • Aesthetics and embodied practices
  • Lived experiences
  • Social justice movements/activism
  • Chaplaincy in schools
  • Aboriginal Peoples
  • Migration
  • Gender and class
  • Youth and celebrity cultures

The conveners are planning to publish chapters in an edited volume after the symposium.

Associate Professor Cristina Rocha
ARC Future Fellow
Director of Religion and Society Research Cluster
Western Sydney University
Editor: Journal of Global Buddhism
Editor: Religion in the Americas series, Brill
http://www.uws.edu.au/religion_and_society/people/researchers/dr_cristina_rocha

Call for Papers: Religion and the Rise of Populism: Migration, Radicalism and New Nationalisms

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/pgas/crss-call-for-papers-religion-rise-populism

The editors of the journal Religion, State and Society are pleased to invite contributions to a special issue, slated for publication in early 2018. The special issue will investigate the roles of religion in recent trends towards populist politics, in particular as manifested in public reactions to migration, the rise of new nationalisms, and the increasing prominence of radicalism.

Growing evidence suggests that these developments are taking centre stage throughout the world, set in a wider context of global political and economic uncertainty. It can also be observed that religion plays an important role in each of these three issues, often in ways that interconnect them. For example, the actions of the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria have exacerbated an already worrisome global migration crisis, while also heightening concerns about violent radicalism.  From France to the Philippines, public anxieties surrounding ISIS and domestic ‘radicalisation’ have become frequent motifs in populist rhetoric that links them with increasing flows of migrants as representative of threats to social security and the economic wellbeing of local populations.

Other examples of contemporary issues in which religion is implicated in populist politics and linked to migration, new nationalisms, and radicalism include: the emphasis on ‘Hindu values’ in the politics of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party in India; the Christian or anti-Muslim rhetoric of American presidential candidates; the UK Brexit campaigners’ use of the prospective membership of ‘Muslim’ Turkey in the EU; the deepening significance of ‘traditionalist’ and pro-Orthodox rhetoric in Russia’s domestic and international politics; and the increasing prominence of religion-based identity politics in Poland, Hungary, and Croatia.

This special issue will seek to probe the various roles of religion in these interlinked issues and across comparative cases. There is an urgent need for considered academic analysis to discern how the rise of populism is connected to religion and the issues of migration, radicalism, and new nationalisms, to elucidate the broader empirical and theoretical implications for our understandings of religion, state, and society.

Areas of investigation can include but are by no means limited to:

  • Religious dimensions of populism in national contexts, including comparative perspectives
  • The migration crisis and its implications for religion-based identity politics in European societies and beyond
  • The ‘crisis’ of the European Union following the Brexit referendum, and its broader implications with relevance to religion
  • Religious dimensions of radicalism: discourses, movements, and politics
  • Religiously-based conservative and traditionalist movements in Europe, the United States, India, Russia, or other parts of the world, including comparative studies
  • Fringe and far-right political and vigilante groups and movements, and their politics of religion
  • Religious dimensions of the securitisation of borders and the ‘othering’ of excluded groups
  • Theoretical, legal, or discourse-based work on the role of religious, such as ‘Christian’ or ‘Hindu’, affinities in constructions of national identity and the operation of national institutions

This special issue of Religion, State and Society is planned for publication in the first half of 2018. The editors have been invited by Routledge to also consider republication of the contributions as a book.

Application Process

Please send completed papers of 6,000-8,000 words by 15 August 2017. To submit a paper, please register for an account and follow the submission instructions at the journal’s online submission portal: http://www.edmgr.com/crss

Before submitting your manuscript please read carefully the journal’s submission instructions, available on the RSS main website under the ‘Instructions for Authors’ page (http://www.tandfonline.com/crss). All manuscripts will go through the normal peer review process.

Questions related to the theme and potential ideas for papers can be discussed with the editors:
Dr Daniel Nilsson DeHanas (daniel.dehanas@kcl.ac.uk)
Dr Marat Shterin (marat.shterin@kcl.ac.uk)

Call for Papers: Special Issue: Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Invitation to the Special Issue of Central and Eastern European Migration Review

Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Guest editors:

Katarzyna Leszczyńska, Faculty of Humanities, AGH University of Science and Technology

Sylwia Urbańska, Institute of Sociology, University of Warsaw

Katarzyna Zielińska, Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University

Despite the dynamic development of migration studies in recent decades, the interplay between gender and religion in their impact on migratory processes and related social phenomenahas not so far become a subject of systematic and in-depth research and reflection.This omission can be traced back to the fact that both gender and religion were ‘latecomers’ to the field of migration studies, because they became a subject of systematic analysis only in the 1980s.At the same time, questions relating to interactions between gender, religion and migration are becoming more and more pressing in the light of growing glocalisation and transnationalism, and dramatically intensifying migratory processes, especially migration of persons seeking refugee status from wars and social conflicts.The existing gap in research results in a lack of systematic knowledge of how gendered religious identities and practices as well as religious culture, institutions, and organisationsshape migration flows, motivations,migrant diversified activitiesand migration regimes.

The proposed Special Issue aims at filling this gap in the existing research. Moreover, due to the peculiarity of the CEE region,we regard the question ofthe interplay between gender, religion and migration as being particularly interesting. The culture of most CEE countries, despite post-socialist socioeconomic and political transformations and social change resulting from mass migration, can still be characterised as homogeneous and attached to traditional, conservative gendered values. This conservative shade of the culture is often further strengthened by the influential public role of religion (e.g. the high status and power of the Roman Catholic Church in Poland or Orthodox Church in Romania) and by the low level of secularisation (i.e. prevalence of religious practices and beliefs, support for conservative social values).

The Special Issue will focus on the following topics and general research questions:

  1. How does the interplay between gender and religion influence the migratory experience? How doesreligion shapethe individual and collective experience of migrants, in particular, with regard to the formation of their genderedsocial, class, ethnic, civic and work identities and practices? How do various religious traditions construct and reproduce the gender rules in the symbolic, institutional and experiential dimensions of migration?
  2. How does the activity of religious organisationsand their personnel contribute to creation of various forms of capital supporting (or inhibiting) migrants’ adaptation, integration, andmulticultural identity? How do religious organisations mediate migrants’ adaptation to their new social conditions? How do religious organisationsform bonds and networks of relationships between the cultures of the country of origin and country of settlement?

  3. How (if at all) do the gender patterns and identities embedded in religious organisations transform in various migratory contexts? In which directions do the institutional rules concerning the place of men and women characteristic of conservative gender orders changeas a consequence of migrationinvolvingencounters with multicultural and secular socio-cultural environments as well as with more conservative ones?

We also invite contributions focusing on other topics related to the interaction between religion, gender and migration, because the main purpose of this Special Issue is to showthe recent developments in research on this broad topic in the context of migration to and from theCEE region.

Submission guidelines and related deadlines

10 January 2017 –submission of abstracts

30 March 2017 – submission of articles

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be sent to: ceemr@uw.edu.pl.

Please note that each article will be subject to a double-blind peer review process and positive reviews will be a condition for the publication.

Guidelines for submission can be found at:www.ceemr.uw.edu.pl/sites/default/files/Instructions_to_authors_5.07.2013_final_2.pdf.

For more information on the Central and Eastern European Migration Review,please visitwww.ceemr.uw.edu.pl.

Call for Papers: Special Issue: Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Invitation to the Special Issue of Central and Eastern European Migration Review

Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Guest editors:

Katarzyna Leszczyńska, Faculty of Humanities, AGH University of Science and Technology

Sylwia Urbańska, Institute of Sociology, University of Warsaw

Katarzyna Zielińska, Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University

Despite the dynamic development of migration studies in recent decades, the interplay between gender and religion in their impact on migratory processes and related social phenomenahas not so far become a subject of systematic and in-depth research and reflection.This omission can be traced back to the fact that both gender and religion were ‘latecomers’ to the field of migration studies, because they became a subject of systematic analysis only in the 1980s.At the same time, questions relating to interactions between gender, religion and migration are becoming more and more pressing in the light of growing glocalisation and transnationalism, and dramatically intensifying migratory processes, especially migration of persons seeking refugee status from wars and social conflicts.The existing gap in research results in a lack of systematic knowledge of how gendered religious identities and practices as well as religious culture, institutions, and organisationsshape migration flows, motivations,migrant diversified activitiesand migration regimes.

The proposed Special Issue aims at filling this gap in the existing research. Moreover, due to the peculiarity of the CEE region,we regard the question ofthe interplay between gender, religion and migration as being particularly interesting. The culture of most CEE countries, despite post-socialist socioeconomic and political transformations and social change resulting from mass migration, can still be characterised as homogeneous and attached to traditional, conservative gendered values. This conservative shade of the culture is often further strengthened by the influential public role of religion (e.g. the high status and power of the Roman Catholic Church in Poland or Orthodox Church in Romania) and by the low level of secularisation (i.e. prevalence of religious practices and beliefs, support for conservative social values).

The Special Issue will focus on the following topics and general research questions:

  1. How does the interplay between gender and religion influence the migratory experience? How doesreligion shapethe individual and collective experience of migrants, in particular, with regard to the formation of their genderedsocial, class, ethnic, civic and work identities and practices? How do various religious traditions construct and reproduce the gender rules in the symbolic, institutional and experiential dimensions of migration?
  2. How does the activity of religious organisationsand their personnel contribute to creation of various forms of capital supporting (or inhibiting) migrants’ adaptation, integration, andmulticultural identity? How do religious organisations mediate migrants’ adaptation to their new social conditions? How do religious organisationsform bonds and networks of relationships between the cultures of the country of origin and country of settlement?

  3. How (if at all) do the gender patterns and identities embedded in religious organisations transform in various migratory contexts? In which directions do the institutional rules concerning the place of men and women characteristic of conservative gender orders changeas a consequence of migrationinvolvingencounters with multicultural and secular socio-cultural environments as well as with more conservative ones?

We also invite contributions focusing on other topics related to the interaction between religion, gender and migration, because the main purpose of this Special Issue is to showthe recent developments in research on this broad topic in the context of migration to and from theCEE region.

Submission guidelines and related deadlines

10 January 2017 –submission of abstracts

30 March 2017 – submission of articles

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be sent to: ceemr@uw.edu.pl.

Please note that each article will be subject to a double-blind peer review process and positive reviews will be a condition for the publication.

Guidelines for submission can be found at:www.ceemr.uw.edu.pl/sites/default/files/Instructions_to_authors_5.07.2013_final_2.pdf.

For more information on the Central and Eastern European Migration Review,please visitwww.ceemr.uw.edu.pl.

Conference: The Life and Legacy of Sun Myung Moon and the Unification Movements in Scholarly Perspective

Call for Papers


The Life and Legacy of Sun Myung Moon and the Unification Movements in Scholarly Perspective


29-30 May 2017

Antwerp, Belgium 


Organized By

The European Observatory of Religion and Secularism (Laïcité) in partnership with Faculty of Comparative Study of Religion and Humanism (FVG), CESNUR and CLIMAS (Bordeaux) 


Venue

Faculty of Comparative Study of Religion and Humanism (FVG) 

Bist 164 – B-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerpen. Belgium. Tel.: +32 (0)3 830 51 58

E-mail: info@antwerpfvg.org

www.antwerpfvg.org

2016 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of Exposition of the Divine Principle, written by Sun Myung Moon (1920-2012), founder of the Unification Church that has its roots in South Korea (1954). Since that time, the Unification Church—or Unificationism/Unification Movement(s), among other names and affiliated organizational entities—has spread worldwide and expressed itself in a variety of international contexts. The original Unification Church is a case study of a new religious movement that claims Christian roots but contains a unique and evolving theology, set of practices, and community life that set is apart from the majority Christendom (Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox traditions). In this way it may be comparable to say Mormonism or Christian Science, though of course the Unification Movement has its origins outside the United States, and not surprisingly most of its members reside in Korea, Japan, the Philippines, and throughout East Asia. With the death of Rev. Moon in 2012, the Unification Church has fractured and a number of rival groups—in addition to dozens of smaller schismatic groups—now claim to be the rightful heirs of the founder’s theological mission and institutional legacies. 

Thirty-three years after the publication of Eileen Barker’s groundbreaking book The Making of a Moonie (Oxford, Blackwell Publishers, 1984), we invite religious studies scholars to join us in Antwerp to focus on the Unification Church and Movement(s)—their evolution and possible transformations— over the course of 60+ years of existence. 

The list of topics below is not exhaustive: 

• – Evolution of the governance of the Unification Church/Movement(s), 

• – Organization and associated groups, 

• – Membership: numbers, growth, sociological profile. International expansion, 

• – History, theology, and practices, iconography, 

• – Perception in the world as a South Korean-born new religion, 

• – Judicial issues addressing its status; prosecution in certain countries, 

• – Impact on humanitarianism, art and culture in general, 

• – Media relations and media coverage, 

• – Influences in popular culture, 

• – Relationship with the broader society. 

Practical Information

Language of the conference: English. 

Send a 10 line abstract, with a 5 line résumé of your previous work to: 

Régis Dericquebourg, Associate Professor at the FVG and President of the European Observatory of Religions and laïcité (secularism) redericq@netcourrier.com

and/or to Bernadette Rigal-Cellard, Professor at Université Bordeaux Montaigne, Vice-President of the Observatory. 

bcellard@numericable.fr

and /or Massimo Introvigne : maxintrovigne@gmail.com

and/or Donald Westbrook : westbrook@humnet.ucla.edu

and/or Chris Vonck : fvg.faculteit@skynet.b 

Papers will be considered for publication, with editorial details given during the conference. It is understood that each presenter must submit his or her paper first to the organizers for possible inclusion in the conference proceedings. When submitting the abstract, please inform the committee whether the paper has been submitted for review or publication in another venue.

CALL FOR PAPERS The Religious and Ethnic Future of Europe: An International Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Religious and Ethnic Future of Europe: An International Conference

12-13 June 2017, Åbo Akademi University, Turku/Åbo, Finland

Conference website: http://www.abo.fi/refe/

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1684659638516383/

Europe is undergoing significant demographic changes due to an aging population and increased immigration. This expert symposium will gather internationally leading experts to discuss the cultural, ethnic and religious aspects of this ongoing demographic shift.

The demographics of religion is a new field that has developed alongside growing xenophobia and Islamophobia worldwide. Fear of the demographic change in Europe is one of the ideological motors behind several xenophobic and populist social and political movements. Academic research has lagged behind, but now there is a growing body of serious scholarship on this controversial topic. The conference will bring together people to present the latest research findings as well as methodological and theoretical questions concerning the cultural and societal implications of demographic trajectories. Groundbreaking research has been conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Global Religious Futures Project that has provided elementary data on global demographic trajectories in the 2010s. Also the Vienna Institute of Demography has given major contributions in projecting the future development of religious adherence in the City of Vienna and developing methodologies for the visualization of demographic change.

Keynote lectures:

  • .”What we know and do not know about future religious developments: The contribution of demography” by Dr Anne Goujon, Vienna Institute of Demography, Austria
  • .”New estimates and projections of Europe’s Muslim population” by Dr Conrad Hackett, Pew Research Center, USA
  • .”Religion and demographic change around the world ” by Prof. Vegard Skirbekk, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway
  • .”Estimating Future Religious Diversity in Finland” by Dr Tuomas Martikainen, Migration Institute of Finland

We invite people from different academic backgrounds to discuss religion and demographic developments including but not limited to the following topics:

  • – Demographic projections on religion and ethnicity
  • – Statistics on religion and ethnicity
  • – The use and misuse of demographic and statistics of religion and ethnicity
  • The larger implications of demographic changes for the research on multicultural societies, interreligious encounters and diversity.

To apply, please send an abstract of approximately 150 words to the Donner Institute, donner.institute(at)abo.fi, no later than 31 December, 2016. Letters of acceptance will be posted no later than 31 January, 2017.

Selected papers from the conference will be published in volume 28 of the Donner Institute series Scripta Instituti Donneriani Aboensis as a co-publication of the Donner Institute and the Migration Institute of Finland.

The expert symposium is arranged jointly by the Donner Institute for Research in Religious and Cultural History, the Migration Institute of Finland and the “Young Adults and Religion in a Global Perspective” Åbo Akademi University Centre of Excellence in Research.

CALL FOR PAPERS The Religious and Ethnic Future of Europe: An International Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Religious and Ethnic Future of Europe: An International Conference

12-13 June 2017, Åbo Akademi University, Turku/Åbo, Finland

Conference website: http://www.abo.fi/refe/

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1684659638516383/

Europe is undergoing significant demographic changes due to an aging population and increased immigration. This expert symposium will gather internationally leading experts to discuss the cultural, ethnic and religious aspects of this ongoing demographic shift.

The demographics of religion is a new field that has developed alongside growing xenophobia and Islamophobia worldwide. Fear of the demographic change in Europe is one of the ideological motors behind several xenophobic and populist social and political movements. Academic research has lagged behind, but now there is a growing body of serious scholarship on this controversial topic. The conference will bring together people to present the latest research findings as well as methodological and theoretical questions concerning the cultural and societal implications of demographic trajectories. Groundbreaking research has been conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Global Religious Futures Project that has provided elementary data on global demographic trajectories in the 2010s. Also the Vienna Institute of Demography has given major contributions in projecting the future development of religious adherence in the City of Vienna and developing methodologies for the visualization of demographic change.

Keynote lectures:

  • .”What we know and do not know about future religious developments: The contribution of demography” by Dr Anne Goujon, Vienna Institute of Demography, Austria
  • .”New estimates and projections of Europe’s Muslim population” by Dr Conrad Hackett, Pew Research Center, USA
  • .”Religion and demographic change around the world ” by Prof. Vegard Skirbekk, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway
  • .”Estimating Future Religious Diversity in Finland” by Dr Tuomas Martikainen, Migration Institute of Finland

We invite people from different academic backgrounds to discuss religion and demographic developments including but not limited to the following topics:

  • – Demographic projections on religion and ethnicity
  • – Statistics on religion and ethnicity
  • – The use and misuse of demographic and statistics of religion and ethnicity
  • The larger implications of demographic changes for the research on multicultural societies, interreligious encounters and diversity.

To apply, please send an abstract of approximately 150 words to the Donner Institute, donner.institute(at)abo.fi, no later than 31 December, 2016. Letters of acceptance will be posted no later than 31 January, 2017.

Selected papers from the conference will be published in volume 28 of the Donner Institute series Scripta Instituti Donneriani Aboensis as a co-publication of the Donner Institute and the Migration Institute of Finland.

The expert symposium is arranged jointly by the Donner Institute for Research in Religious and Cultural History, the Migration Institute of Finland and the “Young Adults and Religion in a Global Perspective” Åbo Akademi University Centre of Excellence in Research.

Seeking book reviewer

Book to be reviewed for Asian Medicine: Tradition and Modernity

Apologies for cross-posting. Asian Medicine: Tradition and Modernity (http://www.brill.com/asian-medicine) is a peer-reviewed, english-language multidisciplinary journal aimed at researchers and practitioners of Asian Medicine in Asia as well as in Western countries, published by Brill on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM).

We are looking for someone to review the book Healing Traditions in the Northwestern Himalayas (authored by Pankaj Gupta, Vijay Kumar Sharma and Sushma Sharma and published by Springer).If you are interested, please send an e-mail to Susannah Deane: susannahdeane@gmail.com

Best wishes,

Susannah Deane

Book reviews editor, Hiamalayan  section

Asian Medicine: Tradition and Modernity

New book in the series “ Muslims in Global Societies” (Springer)

Springer has published a new book in the series “ Muslims in Global Societies”, edited by Bryan Turner

Visit the series website at https://www.springer.com/series/7863?detailsPage=titles

Muslims in Global Societies Series

(Editor’s note: Thanks to Springer for contributing to the ISA-RC22 Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars!)