Call for Proposals: The 25th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion

17th-19th August 2020
Gothenburg, Sweden

Religious Organisation(s): Challenges and changes in contemporary society

In today’s globalised and fast changing society, religious organisation and religious organisations face several challenges: Globalization, migration and different secularisation processes, together with political, technological and environmental changes/issues, influence, not only society in general, but also religious organisations and the ways in which religion is practiced and expressed in contemporary society. This situation prompts questions such as:

  • · How do religious organisations handle an influx of new members from other parts of the world and at the same time, an increased loss of members who have been there for a long time?
  • · How do religious organisations react to new technology such as digital communication instead of face-to-face interaction, and web-broadcasted religious meetings?
  • · How do religious groups and organisations handle the late modern individual who has little need of belonging to religious groups, and who is sceptical of religious authority?
  • · How can we explain why late modern individuals choose to belong to conservative and fundamentalist religious groups?

These, and other, questions concerning how religion is organised in contemporary society will be addressed at the 25th NCSR conference held in Gothenburg, Sweden 17th-19th August 2020, which includes a pre-conference for doctoral students in the morning of 17th August.

Dates

  • 15th November 2019          Deadline for submission of session proposals (paper sessions, panels, posters, authors-meets- critics, workshops etc.)
  • 15th Mars 2020                   Deadline for submission of abstracts for papers (max. 200 words)

Information on abstract format and delivery, programme, registration, venue etc. will be available at the conference website:https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/the-25th-nordic-conference-in-the-sociology-of-religion

The conference is hosted by Department of Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion, at Gothenburg University.

We look forward to seeing you in Gothenburg,

  • · Magdalena Nordin, magdalena.nordin@lir.gu.se
  • · Daniel Enstedt, daniel.enstedt@lir.gu.se
  • · Mia Lövheim, mia.lovheim@teol.uu.se
  • · Martha Middlemiss Lé Mon, martha.middlemiss@teol.uu.se

World Congress of Faith Call for Papers

The World Congress of Faiths (WCF) is a community of individuals from different faiths and beliefs working to promote interfaith relations through spiritual dialogue. It organises conferences and lectures designed to stimulate discussion and disseminate new information on this theme.

WCF is seeking papers to be presented at its forthcoming conference:

Meetings of Minds: Conflict, Reconciliation and Inter Faith Relations
Time and Date: 10am to 4pm, Tuesday 10 September 2019
Venue: St Michael’s House, Coventry Cathedral

Keynote speaker: Dr Kristin Aune: ‘How can religious communities or professionals work for mutual respect and understanding in an educational institution?’

We will consider papers on the following and similar themes:

  • What can faith communities learn from studies in reconciliation?
  • Can there be mutual benefit between education for reconciliation and spiritual encounter between faiths?
  • What might a polarised society expect from inter faith relations?
  • Preparing young people for faith diversity
  • Navigating prejudice, toleration, and reconciliation in the global context of inter faith relations and thought

You will be asked to present your own paper and take questions and will have a total of 45 minutes allocated, of which 15 minutes will be for questions.  Papers should reflect original work, which may or may not have been published, and we encourage students to participate. Papers will normally be published in the WCF journal Interreligious Insight after the event.

Reasonable travel expenses will be paid to speakers.

Please send a synopsis of your paper in no more than 200 words together with your affiliation and contact details (term time and home) by Friday 21 June 2019 to: Jenny Kartupelis, jenny@worldfaiths.org<mailto:jenny@worldfaiths.org> If you have any queries, use this email or call on 01223 781781.
WCF: ESSAY AWARD 2019

Call for Papers:r the 1st European Conference for Religious Dialogue and Cooperation

Conference Theme: “THE ROLE OF RELIGION IN PEACE AND CONFLICT”

October 14-17, 2019
Struga, Republic of North Macedonia

One of the key questions that contemporary sociology is faced is what exactly is the role of different religions when conflicts emerged between civilizations, ethnic groups and states? How do religious individuals and groups use their power in a development tending toward either peace or conflict? Sociological, philosophical, anthropological, historical, psychological and theological approaches are welcome in this Conference to contribute in an attempt to answer these questions.

The First European Conference on Religious Dialogue and Cooperation will provide scientific analysis of this global challenge.  It will pay particular attention to their interconnections and to possible solutions.

We encourage authors to submit paper proposals based on the results of their scientific studies, as well as the methodological and theoretical aspects of the study of religion in Europe. The official language of the conference is English. All papers that successfully pass the reviewing process will be published in a journal with an international editorial board.

Please submit a 200-300 words abstract of your presentation by e-mail to: Ivana Dragovic, M.Sc., President of the Conference Organizing Committee email : ivana@fzf.ukim.edu.mk by June 15, 2019.

Key dates:

  • Submission of paper proposals: June 15, 2019.
  • Notification of acceptance and opening of the registration: July 1, 2019.
  • The final date of the registration for the conference: September 15, 2019.
  • Final program: October 1, 2019.
  • Submission of full papers: March 1, 2020

Registration Fee: 150 Eur The costs of travel and accommodation have to be covered by the conference participants. We offer organized transport from the Skopje Airport to Hotel Drim in Struga.

For participants of the conference, Hotel Drim (www.drim.com.mk) offers reduced prices for accommodation with included meals.

All necessary information can be obtained from the official website of the Conference http://icrd.mk/ 

We are looking forward to receiving your papers!

PROFESSOR ZORAN MATEVSKI, Ph.D. Director of the Center for Intercultural Studies and Research At the Faculty of Philosophy in Skopje

Call for Papers: “Mosques, families and Islamic Law”

‘Danish Mosques – Significance, Use and Influence’ together with the ‘Nordic Mosques Research network’ invites papers and applications for participation. This will be the first workshop as part of the HS-NOS funding and the mid-term conference in the Danish Mosques research project.

The workshop will take place at in Göteborg in Sweden at the Hotel Panorama from 21st to 23rd August 2019.

The deadline for the call for papers is May 1st, 2019.

All contact should be addressed to Niels Valdemar Vinding, lbm993@hum.ku.dk

https://mosques.ku.dk/activities/mosques-families-and-islamic-law/

Call for Papers

For this workshop, we invite scholars and researchers in the Nordic countries (and beyond) that work in the intersection of mosques, family and Islamic law. Mosques are widely understood as Muslim institutions in the discursivity of Islam. Similarly, Islamic law is widely defined as Islamic ethics, norms and practice. In our view and in legal terms, the biggest challenge for mosques and Muslims in the Nordic countries is building authentic and responsive legal institutions that may help Muslims in their ethnic, social and legal dilemmas and problems, where Western society seems to disappoint. There is a significant degree of experimentation and different attempts at articulating a religious legal identity and institutions amongst Muslims in the Nordic countries. This has been going on for a number of years, but now seems to be quasi-institutionalised to point where we are able to find legal documents, interview people and observe the process of legal institutionalization.

However, currently Muslim legal institutions are reaching out to governments and courts to better regulate and establish their practices to mitigate the significant risk of having their work deemed illegitimate and even illegal. The most significant legal concern by far is Muslim family law with the fear of parallel legal orders and subversive counter-normativity.

The operable questions for the workshop are; how are Muslims in mosques (and beyond) articulating their legal, ethical and normative identities? What kind of institutions are being build? How many so-called Islamic councils are there in the Nordic countries? How are they seen and used by Muslims? What kind of Islamic law and ethics issues are seen by the courts and quasi-courts in the Nordic countries, such as family matters, divorce, mediation, inherence, honour, polygamy? How do the courts and the legal systems in general approach and address these issues?

We are inviting submissions for papers as well as for participation in the workshop. We will give preference to papers to be presented during the workshop. For paper presentations, we are expecting written contributions to either an upcoming special issue of a leading journal or to a concluding anthology on Nordic Mosques in Context.

Paper abstracts of 300 words or expressions of interest in participation and a short CV to be submitted to Niels Valdemar Vinding, lbm993@hum.ku.dk, on May 1st 2019 at the latest.

Workshop Series Theme

This is the first in a series of three workshops on Nordic Mosques in Context – On the institutional embeddedness of Islam in the Nordic countries sponsored by a NOS-HS Workshop Grant. The second is on ”Mosques, power and politics,” in Copenhagen, Denmark, in January 2020, and the third is on ”Mosques, communities and finance,” in Oslo, Norway, August 2020. The purpose of the workshops is to investigate the dimensions of institutional embeddedness of Islam in the Nordic countries as mosques seek to be responsive institutions for the needs of Muslims, challenged by economic, legal and political alternatives. We are considering mosques as the focal point of Islam in economic, legal and political terms, the primary objective of this research project is to study the institutional strategies of mosques and Muslims in embedding Islam in the Nordic wider societies. The key here is to see to what extend mosques are responsive institutions for the needs of Muslim in soliciting the wider public, or if Muslims go beyond the mosque in the pursuit of other more apt forms of institutionalised religious life such as invoking Islamic economic, legal and political responses. We argue that the entire future of mosques depends on whether they can give and refine responsive and meaningful answers and make them coherent with the economic, legal and politics questions that Muslims seek the answers to. As such, this may result in the secularisation of mosques as they negotiate and find their place in society. Will these new or re-interpreted institutional expressions clash with the general public, will they fail Muslims or will they be viable alternatives for embedding Islam in the Nordic countries?

Workshop structure

We are aiming to conduct this workshop from the afternoon on Wednesday 21st August and finish with lunch on Friday 23rd August. All accepted participants will have flights, trains and other public transportation and hotel costs covered. We are organising a programme with keynotes, paper sessions with 20 minutes presentation and 10 minutes Q&A, as well as an afternoon open to the public and local stakeholders.

Conveners

Brian Arly Jacobsen, assoc. professor, Sociology of Religion, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Torkel Brekke, Research Professor, Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Norway

Göran Larsson, Professor in Religious Studies, Göteborg University, Sweden

Niels Valdemar Vinding, post.doc., Islamic Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

CFP: Conference on Racism and Religion 2019

Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism

Uppsala University

6-8 NOVEMBER, 2019

  • Submission of abstracts: 30 April (200 words)
  • Session proposal: 30 April (400 words)
  • Decision on acceptance: 15 May
  • Registration opens: 1 September
  • Registration closes: 30 September
  • Conference fees: Regular 1 500 SEK. PhD Student 1 000 SEK

The histories of racism and religion are entangled. To understand how processes of racism, nationalism, and exclusion come about in different forms we need to view these developments as intertwined with religion and ideas of religion and religiosity.

The rise of islamophobia and antisemitism, discrimination and violent persecution of minorities in the name of religion or secularism, and controversies around the visibility of religious practices in public space, all point to the need for a deeper understanding of in what ways religion historically and in the present plays a central role in producing and upholding racism and colonial practices/structures.

Religion has also played a central role in counter movements such as civil rights, indigenous rights, anti-colonial and, anti-apartheid movements. An additional aspect to explore is religious symbols and representations that have been part of anti-racist art and music and the place of spiritualism in artistic resistance to racism. What role has and does religion play in developing and upholding racist and nationalist structures? In what ways are different entangled forms of racism and religion being manifested? How can we for example understand antisemitism and islamophobia on a global and local scale? What does it mean to be living in a supposedly post-racial, post-secular world? What role does religion and/or spirituality play in antiracist struggles and movements?

The Center for Multidisciplinary Research on Racism (CEMFOR) invites scholars to send in abstracts for paper presentations and/or session proposals.

More information: http://cemfor.uu.se/events2/conference/conference-2019/

Call for Papers: The Future of British Muslim Studies: Cardiff, 24 April

We are very pleased to accounce the Call for Papers for the next MBRN conference at Cardiff. Details can be found below and at the following link:
http://www.mbrn.org.uk/call-for-papers-the-future-of-british-muslim-studies/

*****************
Call for Papers: The Future of British Muslim Studies
A one-day Muslims in Britain Research Network conference organised in partnership with the Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK, Cardiff University
Date: 24 April 2019

Since the Muslims in Britain Research Network was established over 25 years ago, British Muslim studies has grown exponentially. Yet despite this, the field faces significant challenges and uncertainty about its future direction. With so much of the focus on British Muslims being driven – both in academia and in wider society – by instrumental concerns about security and terrorism, much needed debates about the field’s core goals and purpose have often been obscured. The near constant use of research reports and polls on British Muslims in service of political agendas has meant that not only do those researching British Muslims often struggle to get their voices heard, but they are also forced to face difficult questions about their positioning and politics.

This one day event will bring together those from within and outside of academia who have an interest in shaping the study of Muslim Britain in order to discuss and debate the challenges facing the field and where it should go from here. What should British Muslim studies do, and who should it be for? Should it be seen as part of a project of improving Muslims’ rights and representation, as with the case of comparable fields like Black studies, or remain at a critical distance from Muslim politics? Is the field itself sufficiently inclusive of the diversity of Muslim and non-Muslim voices, and is sufficient recognition given to those outside the academy producing research into Muslims? When, and how, should academics partner with Muslim and community and activist groups? With researchers in the field scattered across disciplines, and with religion increasingly marginalised in the academy, how can the field cohere and have a positive impact?

Abstracts are invited for papers that address any of the conference themes:
  *   Emerging research agendas in, and challenges for, the field of British Muslim studies
  *   The politics of producing knowledge about Muslims in the West
  *   The relationship between academic scholarship and Muslims’ presence, voice and activism
  *   Partnerships between academic and Muslim community groups in the UK
  *   ‘Insider’ and ‘outsider’ dynamics in the study of British Muslims
  *   Complementarities and tensions between disciplinary approaches to the study of Muslims and Islam
  *   Securing the study of Muslims and Islam within and beyond UK higher education

Participants will be asked to present their research in a short format as part of a panel. To participate please send a 250 word abstract to the email address below by 1st March along with a biographical note of no more than 50 words.

Abstract submissions and any general questions should be sent to the conference organisers at MuslimsinBritainRN@gmail.com<mailto:MuslimsinBritainRN@gmail.com>.

Call for Papers: "Religion in Political Contention:

“Religion in Political Contention: Religious Dimensions in Social Movements, Rebellions, and Revolutions”

For a panel proposal to the Association for the Sociology of Religion 81st Annual Meeting, New York, NY, August 11-13, 2019

While religion is often recognized as a social force that maintains, if not legitimates, the socio-political order, religion has also played a role in rebellions, revolts, social movements, and revolutions. Religion, that is, can play a role in contentious politics. Karl Marx famously suggested that religion is the “opium of the people,” a phrase that is frequently taken out of context and misunderstood. In the same passage, he also wrote religion is “an expression of real suffering and a protest against” it, suggesting that religion is also a source and instrument of social change. Indeed, Marx’s collaborator, Friedrich Engels wrote on essay on the German Peasant Wars focusing on the revolutionary movement led by theologian Thomas Münzer, underscoring the latter point on social change dynamics. Similarly, Max Weber showed us how religion is both a source of domination (traditional or bureaucratic) and social transformation (charismatic, which is revolutionary, but also another type of domination). Even Emile Durkheim, who typically is associated with a status quo oriented theory of religion, makes a case for the transcendent power of religious rituals. Today, too many sociologists of religion continue very conventional modes of thinking – religion is either hegemonic or counter-hegemonic — ignoring how religion is both a hegemonic and counter-hegemonic force in past and contemporary political scenarios.

For this panel, we will invite papers that explore the relationship religion – as a shared cultural system, source of solidarity, and ways of thinking, feeling, and acting – has to social movements, rebellions and revolutions. We are interested in understanding how and under what conditions religion functions as a progressive and/or reactionary force that compels people to challenge or protect the order of things. We are particularly interested in prophetic and messianic movements, secular religions (e.g., The Cult of the Supreme Being and Science as Religion), and liberation theologies. While we welcome contemporary explorations (e.g., popular religion and evangelism in Latin America, the Arab Spring, and resistance to globalization), we also welcome the exploration of past events (e.g., the English, French, Iranian, and Nicaraguan revolutions; Taiping and Boxer Rebellions in China; and the German Peasant Wars of the 16th century). Special consideration will be given to theoretical treatments on the relationship religion has to progressive and/or reactionary politics. Papers that focus on contemporary and historical case studies in the U.S. are welcome. Priority will be given to papers that aim to make sense of the institutional, organizational, ritualistic, discursive (e.g., using the Bible or other sacred texts in discussions), ideological, and/or framing mechanisms that give religion its contentious structure.

Deadline for Paper Proposals: March 1st, 2019

Paper proposals should include name, affiliation, email address, title, and a 200-word abstract describing the paper’s research question, methodology, and preliminary results.

Please send paper proposal in MS Word by e-mail to the panel organizers:

Jean-Pierre Reed, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, reedjp@siu.edu and

Warren S. Goldstein, Center for Critical Research on Religion,
goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org

VIth Open Conference of the Section on Sociology of Religion, German Sociological Association, 7th – 9th December 2017

 

Conference Venue: St. Bernhard in Rastatt (near Karlsruhe) / GERMANY

Sociological research on religion is empirically and thematically diverse.
Since the classical authors, religion has been identified as a mirror and
as a place of social change. With its integrative and contentious
potentials, as well as its continuities and discontinuities, religion is
also currently a central object of sociological interest; it allows an
exemplary reflection on social processes of transformation and
stabilisation. This leads to multifaceted research on religious realities,
both in European societies and in other world regions. In order to
highlight the relations between religion and society, the Section on
Sociology of Religion in the German Sociological Association (DGS)
invites scholars to its VIth Open Conference, to present diverse,
empirically and theoretically oriented contributions from a sociology of
religion perspective.

Research themes may concern institutional conditions and organisational
forms of religious practice, religious knowledge and beliefs, the
configuration of power relations in the religious field, religious gender
relations, processes of professionalisation or the diversification of
religiosity towards popular religion and spiritualisation, religious
movements, emotions and ritual forms or religious biographies, the
negotiation of religious practices and identities in migration contexts or
the representation of religiosity in the public sphere. Contributions to
varying topics and areas are very welcome. A special focus of the
conference is on methodological questions; several panels will be reserved
for the discussion of this issue. The conference offers the opportunity to
present and discuss different theoretical perspectives and empirical
approaches (quantitative and qualitative) – and to network.The conference
welcomes the presentation of current research projects and the discussion
of topics that do not fit into the thematically focused events of the
section. Junior scholars are particularly invited to submit abstracts. The
primary language of the conference is German, however English papers are
very welcome.

Deadline: Please submit abstracts of 250 words (in .doc or .pdf format)
by May, 31st 2017 to the three organisers listed below:

Marc Breuer, Katholische Hochschule NRW, Paderborn, m.breuer@katho-nrw.de

Uta Karstein, Universität Leipzig, karstein@uni-leipzig.de

Kornelia Sammet, Universität Leipzig, sammet@uni-leipzig.de

Call for Presentation Proposals: Survey Research and the Study of Religion in East Asia

East Asia, a region rich with diverse religious traditions, presents
exciting opportunities as well as unique challenges for survey researchers
interested in religion questions. On October 11-12, 2017, Pew Research
Center will host a small conference to advance the state of the art in the
study of religion using surveys in East Asia (focusing particularly on
China, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan).

The conference will be a gathering of survey researchers based in East Asia
as well as those based outside the region. Survey researcher and
Confucianism scholar Anna Sun <http://personal.kenyon.edu/suna/> will be
our keynote speaker. Plenary sessions will feature survey researchers and
religion scholars invited to discuss what it means to be religious in East
Asia and the major challenges of conducting survey research on the topic.
Breakout sessions will feature presentations submitted in response to this
call for papers.

*Breakout sessions will be composed of 10-minute presentations.* With
limited time, presenters are encouraged to get straight to the most
interesting kernel of their work. This efficient format permits more
presentations and discussion than would otherwise be possible and creates
opportunity for follow-up conversations during breaks.
Proposals that focus on the methodology of how survey work can be improved
are particularly welcome. Presentations could assess existing survey
measures of a concept and present a new alternative. They might focus on an
important religious practice or belief that tends not to be measured in
surveys, particularly if one has suggestions for how this practice/belief
could be captured with surveys. Presentations that describe interesting
findings from existing surveys are also welcome, particularly if they point
toward how future survey work might be improved.

*Space is limited for this event*, both on the program and in the meeting
facilities at our Washington, DC headquarters. Thanks to the generous
support of the Pew-Templeton Global Religious Futures project, there is no
cost to attend the event. Additionally, thanks to a grant from the Global
Religion Research Initiative <http://grri.nd.edu/r1awards>, airfare and
lodging expenses will be covered for a limited number of scholars based in
East Asia traveling to the conference from Asia. Some participants may wish
to stay for the annual conference <http://www.sssrweb.org/> of the
Scientific Study of Religion, which will be held nearby October 13-15.

*To propose a 10 minute presentation, please email a title and abstract of
no more than 300 words along with a short statement about why you are
interested in this conference to Conrad Hackett (chackett@pewresearch.org
<chackett@pewresearch.org>) by June 20.*

*Key dates*
June 20 Deadline for presentation proposals
June 30 Proposal decision notification
July 1 Registration opens (if space permits, those not presenting can apply
to participate in the conference)
August 1 Registration closes
October 11 Day 1 of conference 9 am – 6:30 pm
October 12 Day 2 of conference 9 am – 5 pm

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel), Annual Conference 2017: On the Edge? Centres and Margins in the Sociology of Religion. Wednesday 12th July – Friday 14th July 2017, University of Leeds.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Bryan Turner (City University of New York)

Professor Kim Knott (University of Lancaster)

Professor Philip Mellor (University of Leeds)

(Two further keynotes, TBC)

 

The Sociology of Religion, as a distinct sub-discipline, has had a complex relationship with ‘mainstream’ sociology including experiencing periods of centrality and marginalisation. Beginning as a chief concern of the founding fathers of the discipline, but later relegated to almost insignificance until the so-called ‘resurgence of religion’, these changing fortunes have contributed directly to scholarship that can be dynamic, multi-faceted and responsive. In our search to understand the roles for religion in contemporary society, as scholars we frequently draw on multi-disciplinary methodologies and share a disciplinary platform with geography, politics, social policy, theology, anthropology, history and literature, to name but a few.  But where does this leave the sociology of religion as a distinct discipline?

The purpose of this conference is to investigate the boundaries and borders of sociologies of religion in an expansive and inclusive way. We want to ask, what do the centres of the sociology of religion look like in the 21st Century, and where are the margins and borders? Where are the new, and innovative subjects, methodologies and collaborations in our subject and how are they shaping the discipline?  How well do Sociologies of Religion intersect with other sociologies, such as of class, migration, ethnicity, sexuality and gender, and what are the effects? What about the geographical centres and margins of this historically Western-orientated sub-discipline, in our ever-changing world characterised by postcoloniality, globalisation and transnationalism? To what extent have any alternative Sociologies of Religion from the “edge”, to use a term proposed by Bender et al (2013), re-interpreted or re-configured the concerns of the centre? Importantly, what light does the Sociology of Religion shed on the more general study of centres and margins in religious and social settings/institutions and identities/subjectivities? Ultimately we want to question where these expansive and multi-directional boundaries leave us as ‘sociologists of religion’ and as a distinct study group and highlight the challenges and the opportunities.

We invite you to engage in these conference questions from your particular area of research.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

Please send abstracts to the attention of the conference organizers: Dr Caroline Starkey (University of Leeds) and Dr Jasjit Singh (University of Leeds) at socrel2017@gmail.com

 

Abstracts must be submitted by 9th December 2016.

 

Conference Bursaries:

A limited number of bursaries are available to support postgraduate, early career, low income or unwaged SocRel members to present at the conference. Please visit http://socrel.org.uk/socrel-annual-bursary-scheme/ for instructions, and to download an application form, and submit your bursary application along with your abstract by 9th December 2016.

All presenters must be members of SocRel.

Selected authors will be asked to contribute to an edited volume.

 

Key Dates:

Abstract submission: Open now

Early bird registration opens: 3rd October 2016

Abstract submission closes: 9th December 2016

Decision notification: 20th January 2017

Presenter registration closes: 10th March 2017

Early bird registration closes:  2nd June 2017

Registration closes: 23rd June 2017

Please note that after Friday, 23rd June 2017, a £50 late registration fee will apply to all bookings.

 

Should you have other questions about the conference please also contact the conference organisers, Dr Caroline Starkey (University of Leeds) and Dr Jasjit Singh (University of Leeds) at socrel2017@gmail.com.

For further details, visit the SocRel website: www.socrel.org.uk. For further details about the BSA visit www.britsoc.co.uk.

Link to online CfP: http://socrel.org.uk/sociology-of-religion-study-group-socrel-annual-conference-2017/