Confrence: Religion(s) and Power(s)

Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania
October 5-6, 2017

The Lithuanian Society for the Study of Religions in cooperation with Latvian Society for the Study of Religions and Estonian Society for the Study of Religions invites proposals for its upcoming international conference “Religion(s) and Power(s)”. To encourage new directions in the critical research of interrelations of religion(s) and power(s) from a broad range of approaches, we are seeking proposals on a wide range of topics including:
•    Private and public religions
•    Religions and politics
•    Non-religion and power
•    Religious inequalities and discrimination
•    Religions, human rights and justice
•    Powers of/within religions
•    Religion and nationalism
•    Mythology, divine kinship and power
•    Religion and colonialism
,•    Religions and education.
Other topics related to the conference theme are also encouraged.

Conference paper and session proposals must be sent by June 15, 2017. Please send your 250-300 word abstract and a 200-word personal bio to email: religiousstudieslt@gmail.com

Important conference dates:
June 15, 2017 – submission of conference paper and session proposals;
July 1, 2017 – notification of paper/session proposal acceptance;

July 1, 2017 – opening of registration for the conference;

August 15, 2017 – closing of registration for the conference;

September 1, 2017 – announcement of the conference program.


Conference Registration Fees:
–    Members of national associations of Baltic States associations for the study of religions – 50 EUR
–    Permanent/full-time faculty and non-affiliated participants – 80 EUR;
–    Graduate students and emeritus faculty – 50 EUR;
–    Late bird conference fee – 100 EUR.

Publishing announcement: Migration and Society

Journal published by Berghahn

Migration is at the heart of the transformation of societies and communities and touches the lives of people across the globe. Migration and Society is a new interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.
Migration and Society addresses both dynamics and drivers of migration; processes of settlement and integration; and transnational practices and diaspora formation. We publish theoretically informed and empirically based articles of the highest quality, especially encouraging work that interrogates and transcends the boundaries between the social sciences and the arts and humanities.
We also welcome articles that reflect on the complexities of both studying and teaching migration, as well as pieces that focus on the relationship between scholarship and the policies and politics of migration.
Submissions are welcome for consideration in one of the five journal sections:
o   Research Articles: Each issue will include articles (max. 8,000 words) addressing a key theme, in addition to a range of other migration-and-society related articles
o   The People & Places section consists of shorter pieces (2,000-4,000 words), including notes from the field, ‘migrant voices’, and interviews with scholars, practitioners, and policymakers
o   The Reflections section invites critical reflections (max. 5,000 words) on migration research and teaching
o   The Creative Encounters section invites poetry, shorter prose pieces, photo essays, and other  engagements with migration
o   Each issue concludes with a Book Reviews section (800 words for single book reviews, 13-1400 words for reviews of two books, 15-1600 words for three books).
 
Migration and Society is edited by Mette Louise Berg (UCL) and Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (UCL).
 
Inaugural issue (publication August 2018)
Hospitality and hostility towards migrants: global perspectives
Recent years have seen an unprecedented scale of global forced migration. Millions of people have fled conflicts and mass human rights violations as well as poverty and persecution. Across sites of transit and settlement migrants have been met by a combination of hospitality and hostility.
For the inaugural issue of Migration and Society, we welcome theoretically and empirically informed contributions that help us develop a more nuanced understanding of the complex responses and experiences of hospitality and hostility around the world and in different historical contexts. We invite contributions that offer critical analyses of the following questions:
1.      How, and why, have different actors responded to the actual, prospective, and imagined arrival of migrants across time and space?
2.      How have migrants and refugees experienced and responded to different, and at times overlapping, processes of hospitality and hostility in sites of transit and settlement?
3.      What are the politics and the poetics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants in different spaces?
4.      As ‘new’ migrants join established diasporas and transnational communities, how have ‘locals’ and ‘established’ migrants and refugees responded to ‘newly’ displaced people?
5.      How, why, and with what effects have diverse media represented processes of migration? Who has been rendered (hyper)visible and audible, and/or invisible, inaudible, and silenced in different representations of migration?
6.      What are the historic resonances, continuities, and discontinuities of contemporary dynamics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants?
We especially welcome articles that examine – and interrogate – the applicability of the concepts of hospitality and hostility in different settings; and that explore the relationship between these and other concepts, including cosmopolitanism, welcome, conviviality, neighbourliness, and solidarity, from the perspective of the global South as well as the North.
 
Deadline for submitting articles for inclusion in issue 1: 30 September 2017.
 

Call for Papers: ISA Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion (RC22)

Call for Papers: ISA Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion (RC22)

Call For Book Proposals: Religion and the Social Order

A Book Series from Brill Academic Publishers and the Association for the Sociology of Religion

We are now seeking book proposals for Religion And The Social Order book series. The series was initiated by the Association for the Sociology of Religion (ASR), which is an international scholarly association that seeks to advance theory and research in the sociology of religion. The aim of Religion and the Social Order (RESO) is to publish edited volumes or single topic monographs that center around a particular set of current interests within the sociology of religion. It specifically aims to advance theory and research within this field of study. The series seeks to publish at least one volume per year. Under the auspices of the Association for the Sociology of Religion, RESO has been published by Brill since 2004 and under the General Editorship of Inger Furseth since 2016.  Please view the full Call For Proposals and find out more about the Manuscript Proposal Guidelines.

Call for Papers: Eighth International Conference on Religion & Spirituality in Society

April 17-18, 2018

University of California at Berkeley, USA

We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, colloquia, virtual posters, or visual lighting talks. The conference features research addressing the annual themes.

Call for papers

Presentation Types

Emerging Scholar Awards

Themes

Scope and Concerns

Conference History

Submit your proposals by April 17th, 2017.

We welcome the submission of proposals to the conference at any time of the year before the final submission deadline. All proposals will be reviewed within two to four weeks of submission.

Paper Submissions: Inequalities Conference MSU

Inequalities Conference
MSU College of Education 
June 12 -13,
 Our multidisciplinary conference will bring together researchers and practitioners in dialogue to address pressing issues of inequality.  Among our invited dialogue participants are sociologists Richard Alba from CUNY – The Graduate Center, Cornelia Kristen from University of Bamberg, Germany, and Stephanie Nawyn from Michigan State University.  
 
For more detailed description please see below as well as the attached conference brochure.  We are currently accepting paper submissions until April 1 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time. 
 

Call for Papers: Displaced Narratives: Story-telling in studying war and displacement

PACSA Meeting 2017 – Amsterdam
The Making of Peace, Conflict and Security
Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion
6th Bi-annual Peace and Conflict Studies in Anthropology meeting (PACSA)
28-30 August 2017, Amsterdam
 

Call for Papers for a Panel:
Displaced Narratives: Story-telling in studying war and displacement
Convenors:
Katarzyna Grabska, Senior Research Fellow, The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, katarzyna.grabska@graduateinstitute.ch
Cindy Horst, Research Professor and Research Director, Peace Research Institute Oslo, cindy@prio.org
There is increasing attention to the power of individual and collective stories in academia and beyond. Stories inform the actions of human beings and impact where they are moving, individually and as a society. Individuals – including researchers and their informants – activate new stories that transport others to new points of view and can change meaning, action and thus the future. As bell hooks argues, theorizing about personal experience not only posits the personal as critical to understanding socio-political social boundaries; but makes it possible to consider how the personal provides room to create alternative narratives. To what extend can storytelling be used as a method to study war, peace and displacement? We invite contributions that use different story-telling methods to unravel the complexities of inclusion and exclusion that accompany the trajectories of refugees and displaced people, including, but not limited to, innovative use of graphic design, literature and poetry, film and therapeutic performance, and the traditional life history method. In what ways do these methods reveal different understandings of the temporal and spatial aspects of displacement? What are the challenges in designing such research, and what type of insights can we develop as researchers? What are the limits in using a story-telling approach? How is this approach a way of excavating both hidden agency and power hierarchies in displacement?
To submit your paper proposals, please follow the instructions on the PACSA conference website:
The deadline for paper submissions is Sunday 2 April, 2017.
A pdf-version of the call for papers is available on PACSA’s website.

Call for Session Proposals: ISA Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion (RC22)

XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology
Power, Violence and Justice: Reflections, Responses and Responsibilities
Toronto, Canada, July 15-21, 2018

RESEARCH COMMITTEE 22: SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION: Religion, Power, and Resistance: New Ideas for a Divided World

NOW OPEN – Call for Session Proposals: ISA Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion (RC22): https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/rc/cfs.cgi?

Program Coordinators:

  • Anna Halafoff, Deakin University, Australia
  • Sam Han, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • Caroline Starkey, University of Leeds, UK

Current environmental, economic, social, and political challenges indicate that people are losing faith in existing power structures and mechanisms for coping with crises. This creates increasingly divided societies, riven by ideological battles for the future of the human and the more than human world. Religion has a place in this picture. Not only is it often a source of divisions; it can also be a source for alternative means of addressing them.

These divisions take new and as yet unclear shapes, which sociologists are only now beginning to comprehend. It is not enough to refer to the struggle between ‘tradition’ and ‘modernity’, terms that dominated sociology through the 1970s. Nor do the tropes ‘colonialism vs. anti-colonialism’ and the ‘clash of civilizations’ adequately explain what is going on. Nor, arguably, does ‘populism vs neo-liberalism’ fully capture such things as the recent clashes between cosmopolitan and anticosmopolitan actors in the major Western democracies. Each of these has a piece of the picture; none of them captures it all.

What is religion’s role in this situation: as a creator of divisions, as a locus of power, and as a ground of resistance?  How does religion influence our divided societies? How is religion influenced in turn?

We invite proposals for RC22 sessions that focus on religion, power, intersectional violence, and social divisions, and also resistance to power, violence, and division. We encourage sessions that explore the nexus between:

  • religion and global capitalism;
  • religion and colonialism;
  • religion and nationalism;
  • religion and racism;
  • religion and violent extremism;
  • religion and gender inequality;
  • religion and sexuality inequality;
  • religion and environmental crises;
  • religion and resistance to power and violence; and
  • other topics that speak to religion’s role in a divided world.

We particularly encourage a focus on new ideas. We thus encourage sessions on:

  • post-colonial, Southern and Eastern social theories;
  • gender and sexuality equality;
  • violent and nonviolent social movements;
  • human rights and peacebuilding;
  • third spaces, digital activism, and other new phenomena.

Above all, we seek new ways of understanding religion in our divided world.

The ISA CONFEX website site will be open to session proposals between 2 February and 15 March, 2017 24:00 GMT.

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/rc/cfs.cgi?

We welcome both pre-organised invited sessions, topical sessions that will be open to paper proposals by individuals, and poster sessions and roundtable proposals.

Once the sessions are chosen, individuals will have an opportunity to propose individual papers for those sessions, from April 25 to September 30, 2017 24:00 GMT, also at the CONFEX website.

Please address any questions to the Program Coordinators:

SISR/ISSR July 2017 Conference moved to Lausanne; Call for Session Proposals Extended to October 25th

Dear Colleagues:

We are writing to let you know that the SISR/ISSR Executive has made the decision to hold the 2017 conference in Lausanne, Switzerland from 4-7 July 2017, instead of in Melbourne Australia. Only very recently has it become clear that a conference in Melbourne would not be possible for financial reasons. The Executive has had to decide quickly in order to be able to guarantee a conference in 2017.  

We thank the Australian local committee and its president, Bob Dixon, for their efforts and energy and we will be able to use a considerable amount of their work for the Lausanne conference. We also hope that a ISSR conference in Australia will be possible some time in the future.

The conference in Lausanne will keep the theme “Religion, Cooperation, and Conflict in Diverse Societies”.

Because of the relocation, we make a second call for session proposals to give members a chance who would consider coming to Lausanne but would not have been able to go to Melbourne.

You can again propose until October 25th:

  • Thematic session – A session with papers on a common theme. If the theme attracts many papers, the thematic session may stretch over several slots.
  • Working Group session – A session of papers presented by those who work together on a specific project.
  • New Research Forum – Intended for students and young researchers (PhDs). The NRF usually have two sessions with a common theme and a session for free papers that do not fit into     the other ISSR thematic sessions.
  • Author Meets Critics session – A session in which an author meets scholars who criticize his/her book and responds.

The conference is bilingual.  Sessions may be in French, in English, or both.

Please submit your session proposals via our system: http://sisr-issr-conference-submission-2017.com/index.php/test/rccds2017   Before doing so, please consult instructions for conference submissions: https://www.sisr-issr.org/en/conference/instructions-for-registration-on-the-open-conference-system-religion-cooperation-and-conflict-in-diverse-societies

Attention: This is not yet the call for individual paper proposals. The call for paper proposals will be opened in mid-November.

This is a late change of plans and we apologize for any inconvenience to our members. We are convinced, however, that the ISSR conference at the new venue in Lausanne will be a success and we hope very much to meet you there.

With best wishes,

Jörg Stolz
President of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion