Call for Proposals: The 25th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion

17th-19th August 2020
Gothenburg, Sweden

Religious Organisation(s): Challenges and changes in contemporary society

In today’s globalised and fast changing society, religious organisation and religious organisations face several challenges: Globalization, migration and different secularisation processes, together with political, technological and environmental changes/issues, influence, not only society in general, but also religious organisations and the ways in which religion is practiced and expressed in contemporary society. This situation prompts questions such as:

  • · How do religious organisations handle an influx of new members from other parts of the world and at the same time, an increased loss of members who have been there for a long time?
  • · How do religious organisations react to new technology such as digital communication instead of face-to-face interaction, and web-broadcasted religious meetings?
  • · How do religious groups and organisations handle the late modern individual who has little need of belonging to religious groups, and who is sceptical of religious authority?
  • · How can we explain why late modern individuals choose to belong to conservative and fundamentalist religious groups?

These, and other, questions concerning how religion is organised in contemporary society will be addressed at the 25th NCSR conference held in Gothenburg, Sweden 17th-19th August 2020, which includes a pre-conference for doctoral students in the morning of 17th August.

Dates

  • 15th November 2019          Deadline for submission of session proposals (paper sessions, panels, posters, authors-meets- critics, workshops etc.)
  • 15th Mars 2020                   Deadline for submission of abstracts for papers (max. 200 words)

Information on abstract format and delivery, programme, registration, venue etc. will be available at the conference website:https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/the-25th-nordic-conference-in-the-sociology-of-religion

The conference is hosted by Department of Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion, at Gothenburg University.

We look forward to seeing you in Gothenburg,

  • · Magdalena Nordin, magdalena.nordin@lir.gu.se
  • · Daniel Enstedt, daniel.enstedt@lir.gu.se
  • · Mia Lövheim, mia.lovheim@teol.uu.se
  • · Martha Middlemiss Lé Mon, martha.middlemiss@teol.uu.se

CALL FOR PAPERS/BOOK CHAPTERS – **ISLAM AND HUMOUR*

Seeking submissions for an edited volume on Islam and Humour.

We propose a pioneering essay collection on a topic of great scholarly and public interest, aimed at exploring in greater depth the links between Islam and humour.

The idea that Islam resists and perhaps even opposes humour is widespread in the West. This view is based in part on the public outrage in Muslim countries over the *Jyllands Posten *caricatures of 2006 (also known as the Muhammad
cartoons controversy) and the deadly attacks on cartoonists at *Charlie Hebdo* in 2015. Strict blasphemy laws and other restrictions on free speech in Muslim countries have further nurtured the idea that Islam is averse to humour, an outlook compounded and reinforced by persistent stereotypes that frequently circulate throughout western media.

Against this backdrop, we invite contributors to address a range of themes  on this topic, including the following:

  • – humour in the lives of Muslims around the world
  • – joking as an oppositional strategy in Muslim contexts
  • – how Muslim comics use jokes to counteract oppression, in either Muslim majority or minority contexts
  • – how Muslim comics use humour as a tool for social integration into new communities
  • – the historical role of humour in Arabic culture and other Muslim contexts
  • – systematic study of the kinds of humour that are tolerated and those that are not tolerated in Muslim societies, including discussions on the distinction between “permissible” and “impermissible” laughter
  • – what Muslim scriptures say about laughter
  • – comparing and contrasting what constitutes a “sense of humour” with respect to Muslim and non-Muslim communities
  • – the role and/or presence of humour in contemporary mass media in Muslim countries
  • – laughter in formal religious settings such as mosques and madrasas
  • – manifestations of “Muslim humour” in western countries (USA, Canada, UK, Germany, France, etc.), such as Muslim stand-up comedians and TV shows with Muslim settings and/or themes

Authors are invited to submit by 1st August 2019 a 500-word chapter proposal and a short bio to the two editors listed below. The deadline for chapter submissions is 1st June 2020. Final chapters are expected to be between 5,000-8,000 words (including all notes and references).

We look forward to hearing from you and to receiving your submissions!

Thank you.

Lina Molokotos-Liederman: mololied@gmail.com
https://arts-london.academia.edu/LinaMolokotosLiederman

Bernard Schweizer: Bernard.Schweizer@liu.edu
https://longisland.academia.edu/BernardSchweizer

Co-founders of Humour and Religion Network:
https://groups.yahoo.com/humour-religion

Conference on Study of Science and Belief in Society–4-6 July, Birmingham

Dear List Members,

Registration is now open for non-presenting delegates who wish to attend the first annual conference of the newly established International Research Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society being held at the University of Birmingham from 4-6 July, 2019.

This is a multidisciplinary conference with speakers from disciplines including the history of science, sociology of religion, science and technology studies, philosophy, social psychology, science communication studies, education studies, and anthropology. Keynote papers will be given by historian Professor Peter Harrison, Australian Laureate Fellow and Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland (Australia), and psychologist Professor Cristine Legare, associate professor of psychology and the director of the Evolution, Variation, and Ontogeny of Learning Laboratory at The University of Texas at Austin (USA).

A full programme and book of abstracts can be found online: https://www.scienceandbeliefinsociety.org/about/engage/events/annual-conference-2019/

The conference themes are:

  • · The social scientific and historical study of the relationship between science and religious and/or non-religious belief and identity;
  • · Public perceptions of the relationship between science, religion and non-religion and their respective roles in society;
  • · National and international comparative perspectives on the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Past and present media or popular representations of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · The past or present roles of science, rationalism, religion and belief in national, social or cultural identity and related geopolitical narratives;
  • · Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of science, religion and non-religion in society;
  • · Methodological approaches to, and issues in, the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Avenues for future research and developments within the social scientific and historical study of science, religion and belief in society;

· Public policy research relating to any aspect of public policy that intersects with issues connected to science, religion and belief in society. Including studies on the impact of publics’ views on science and religion on policy making, and provision for religious, spiritual or non-religious communities across a range of geographies and issues (e.g. healthcare provision, educational policy, science policy, environmental policy or development);

· International studies of religious or spiritual communities’ perspectives on the intersection, and possible relationships, between science and religion over time.

Costs for attendance are as follows:

  • · Full Conference Registration (incl. lunches + evening meals) = £390
  • · Full Conference Registration (incl. lunches only) = £300
  • · Day Delegate Rate (incl. lunch only) = £120
  • · Discounted Full Conference Registration (incl. lunch + evening meals) = £170
  • · Discounted Day Delegate Rate (incl. lunch only) = £60

The subsidised discounted rate is available to PhD Students, unwaged/independent scholars, and retired scholars only. Participants will be expected to arrange their own travel and accommodation, although there are some very limited places available in the conference hotel, Edgbaston Park Hotel.

To register click here: https://shop.bham.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/college-of-arts-law/school-of-philosophy-theology-religion/international-research-network-for-the-study-of-science-belief-in-society-annual-conference

Please share this announcement among your networks, and if you have any questions please do not hesitate to get in touch (A.F.Hall@bham.ac.uk). An online version of this announcement can be found & shared at: https://www.scienceandbeliefinsociety.org/events-and-workshops/registration-open-science-and-belief-in-society-conference-birmingham-uk-4-6-july/

Kind Regards,

Dr Alexander Hall

Appel à contribution – « Repenser le martyre par le biais des femmes »

Cher(e)s Collègues,

Vous trouverez ci-dessous un appel à contribution pour un numéro thématique de la revue Religiologiques.  S’il vous plait, auriez-vous l’amabilité d’acheminer cet Appel à contribution aux personnes et vos réseaux susceptibles d’être intéressés.  En vous remerciant de votre généreuse assistance.

Avec nos sentiments les plus cordiaux
Roxanne D. Marcotte
Université du Québec à Montréal, UQAM
(pour la rédaction de Religiologiques)

**********************************************************

AAArelititre

    APPEL À CONTRIBUTION : NUMÉRO THÉMATIQUE

     « Repenser le martyre par le biais des femmes »

Le « martyre » désigne à la fois l’acte de mise à mort pour motifs religieux ou politiques, ainsi que le récit de ce drame. L’objectif de ce numéro thématique est de (re)penser le martyre par le biais de « figures de femmes », ces « martyres » qui résistent et s’opposent jusqu’à la mort – ultime témoignage de leurs convictions religieuses (mourir pour sa foi) ou politiques (mourir pour une idéologie, une cause, sa patrie, etc.).

Il conviendra, dans un premier temps, d’interroger la notion même de « martyre », cette mort qui se montre publiquement et qui incarne une contestation de légitimité religieuse ou politique.  Puis, dans un deuxième temps, il sera opportun d’étudier des cas particuliers de martyre de femmes qui, de tout temps (de l’antiquité jusqu’à aujourd’hui) et qu’elles soient d’ici ou d’ailleurs, ont contesté et « témoigné » par l’ultime sacrifice de leurs vies.

Au cœur de la problématique entourant les figures de femmes martyres résident les questions du genre (Butler), de sa construction et des dynamiques de rapports de genre (Bourdieu ; Woodhead ; Grosjean). S’attarder à ces questions et ces dynamiques permettra de proposer de nouvelles pistes de réflexion pour mieux saisir le phénomène du martyre des femmes, et contribuer ainsi à la production de nouvelles interprétations, analyses et théories. Trois pistes d’exploration seront privilégiées :

I – Les femmes martyres de l’Antiquité et du Moyen-Âge (du deuxième siècle avant notre ère à la Renaissance), que celles-ci appartiennent aux traditions juives (Haber ; Lemelin), chrétiennes (Amat ; Cardman ; Salisbury) ou musulmanes (Aghaie), et que les représentations de ces femmes martyres (Joslyn-Siemiatkoski ; Tolonen) soient issues des textes hagiographiques de la martyrologie (Destephen) ou de l’histoire de la réception de ces représentations (Baslez ; Doran ; Sei). Comment les martyres de jadis peuvent-elles nous aider à penser les femmes martyres d’aujourd’hui, voire à penser ce qui advient au phénomène même du martyre ?

II – Femmes martyres de la modernité, que celles-ci s’inscrivent dans une trajectoire mortifère religieuse ou politique, quelles que soient la nature de leurs motivations – femmes kamikazes des Tigres Tamouls du Sri Lanka, séparatistes kurdes du PKK en Turquie (Grosjean), kamikazes du Caucase (Larzillière ; Campana) et du Proche-Orient (Blom ; Straub ; Sela-Shayoritz ; Vuillemenot), les djihadistes de Daesh (Khosrokhavar et Benslama), etc.–, et quel que soit le genre de culte qui leur est voué. En quoi ces femmes se ressemblent-elles et se différencient-elles des martyres d’autrefois ? Que nous apprennent les études scientifiques qui leur sont dédiées ou encore les représentations qui en sont proposées par les médias traditionnels ou numériques ?

III – Représentations des femmes martyres dans la culture : que celles-ci aient été le sujet d’œuvres littéraires, d’arts visuels ou de musique, de jadis ou d’aujourd’hui. Comment ces femmes martyres (saintes, shahidat, kamikazes, bouddhistes tibétaines immolées, figures de luttes nationales, etc.) sont-elles (re)présentées ?

Les contributions pallieront l’invisibilité de ces femmes martyres (vies, représentations, discours, analyses, théories, etc.) en les (ré)inscrivant dans l’histoire. Ceci pourra s’entreprendre à partir d’un regard disciplinaire (sociologie ; anthropologie ; psychanalyse ; psychologie ; religiologie, etc.) ou interdisciplinaire, ou à partir de différentes approches (diachroniques, synchroniques ou comparatives) – qu’elles s’appliquent aux objets, aux périodes, aux traditions ou aux médiums – pour explorer l’intersection de la notion de martyre avec celles du genre et du sacré.

Longueur des articles

Les articles doivent être de 6 000 à 8 000 mots, en format WORD (.doc) et conformes aux « Consignes de présentation » qui sont disponibles sous l’onglet « Soumission d’articles » du site Web de Religiologiques(https://www.religiologiques.uqam.ca).

Soumission des articles

Les textes sont soumis à l’adresse courriel suivante religiologiques@uqam.ca.

Échéances

Les manuscrits sont à soumettre avant la fin du mois de décembre 2019. Avant de soumettre un texte pour évaluation, il est possible d’acheminer une proposition d’article (de 300 à 400 mots) à la direction du numéro thématique.

Pour de plus amples informations, veuillez contacter

Isabelle Lemelin (PhD, UQAM), la direction du numéro thématique

Département de sciences des religions, Université du Québec à Montréal

Courriel : isabellelemelin@gmail.com

* * * * * * *

INFORMATION sur la revue RELIGIOLOGIQUES

RELIGIOLOGIQUES est une revue de sciences humaines qui s’intéresse aux multiples manifestations du sacré dans la culture ainsi qu’au phénomène religieux sous toutes ses formes. Elle s’intéresse également au domaine de l’éthique. Les articles qu’elle publie font l’objet d’une évaluation des comités de lecture spécialisés (à double insu ; habituellement sollicitation de trois expertises) et indépendants de son comité de rédaction.RELIGIOLOGIQUES est la revue phare de la recherche francophone en sciences des religions en Amérique du Nord publiée de 1990 à 2005 (31 numéros, la majorité des articles étant disponible dans leur intégralité en ligne sur le site de la revue : https://www.religiologiques.uqam.ca) et qui a repris, depuis 2015, sa tradition de publication de numéros thématiques (qui peuvent être proposés), d’articles hors thèmes (acceptés en tout temps) et de numéros varia.

RELIGIOLOGIQUES : Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Département de sciences des religions, Courriel: religiologiques@uqam.ca

ISA-RC22 Call for Papers

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RESEARCH COMMITTEE 22: SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
Call for Abstracts
“Challenges of the 21st century for sociology of religion”

Program Coordinators:

  • Eloísa Martín, United Arab Emirates University, UAE
  • Juan Cruz Esquivel, University of Buenos Aires/ CONICET, Argentina
  • Roberta Bivar Carneiro, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil

The debate on religion, its role, its development, and its future has been intense, extensive and sophisticated during the last few decades. Religion is both a central phenomenon itself and a key variable that can be used to explain economic, social, and political phenomena. Both facets require continuous in-depth research. In recent years, many sociologists have begun to identify limits to the current approach to religious phenomena, and especially to the definitions of religion developed in the West. A number of authors have extended this critique to the ways sociologists currently explain and interpret “religion” in the 21st Century. Though still emerging, such accounts have opened new paths by which sociologists of religion can face both the empirical and theoretical challenges of our era.

We invite abstracts for the following sessions:

We will also be including the following invited sessions in our RC22 program:

The ISA CONFEX website is now open for abstract submissions from April 25 – September 30, 2019 24:00 GMT. Abstracts may only be submitted through the CONFEX site. Programme coordinators cannot include abstracts sent by email or include abstracts submitted after the CONFEX system is closed.

Go to https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/cfp.cgi to enter the CONFEX site and click on Begin a Submission. Abstracts must be submitted in English, French or Spanish.

A person may be listed in the Program:
•    up to 2 times as author or co-author (oral or poster presentation, distributed paper, roundtable presenter)
•    up to 2 times as chair or co-chair, panellist, critic, discussant

To be included in the program the participants (presenters, chairs, discussants, etc.) need to pay full registration fees by March 19, 2020. If not registered, their names will not appear in the Program Book and in the Abstracts Book.

Please address any questions to any of the Program Coordinators:

The 25th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion

17th-19th August 2020, Gothenburg, Sweden

Religious Organisation(s) – challenges and changes in contemporary society

In today’s globalised and fast changing society, religious organisation and religious organisations face several challenges. Globalization, migration and different secularisation processes, but also/together with political, technological and environmental changes/issues, influence, not only society in general, but also religious organisations and the ways in which religion is practiced and expressed in contemporary society. This situation prompts questions such as:

How do religious organisations handle an influx of new members from other parts of the world and at the same time, an increased loss of members who have been there for a long time? How do religious organisations react to new technology such as digital communication instead of face-to-face interaction, and web-broadcasted religious meetings?

Other questions of interest are for example: how do religious groups and organisations handle the late modern individual who has little need of belonging to religious groups, and who is sceptical of religious authority? And, on the other hand, how can we explain why late modern individuals choose to belong to conservative and fundamentalist religious groups?

These, and other, questions concerning how religion is organised in contemporary society will be addressed at the 25th NCSR conference held in Gothenburg 17th-19th August 2020, which includes a pre-conference for doctoral students in the morning of the 17th August.

https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/the-25th-nordic-conference-in-the-sociology-of-religion

Dates

  • 15th November 2019                 Deadline for submission of session proposals (paper sessions, panels, posters, authors-meets- critics, workshops etc.)
  • 15th Mars 2020   Deadline for submission of abstracts for papers

We look forward to seeing you in Gothenburg,

Open-Access article on Mosques as Gendered Spaces

You may be interested in my article on mosques as gendered spaces, which has now been published in the open-access journal Religions. The article is free to download here:

https://www.mdpi.com/2077-1444/10/5/321  Mosques as Gendered Spaces: The Complexity of Women’s Compliance with, And Resistance to, Dominant Gender Norms, And the Importance of Male Allies – mdpi.com

Women’s presence and role in contemporary mosques in Western Europe is debated within and outside Muslim communities, but research on this topic is scarce. Applying a feminist lens on religion and gender, this article situates the mosque as a socially constituted space that both enables and constrains Western European Muslim women’s religious formation, identity-making, participation …

With very best wishes

Line
Dr Line Nyhagen
Reader in Sociology. SFHEA.

New Journal Issue: Scandinavian Jewish Studies 30/1

We are happy to announce the publication of Vol. 30/1 of the journal Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies, which is a special issue focusing on Jewish everyday life and identities in Finland today.

Guest Editors: Mercédesz Czimbalmos & Dóra Pataricza, Åbo Akademi University

You find the journal at https://journal.fi/nj/issue/current

Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies aims at promoting Jewish studies in Scandinavia by publishing scholarly articles, surveys and documents, by reviewing recent literature, and compiling bibliographies. The contributions are published in one of the Scandinavian languages, or in English, German or French, with an abstract in English. The journal is strictly academic and does not pursue any special religious, political or cultural policy.

NJ is published open access online.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Karin Hedner Zetterholm & Ruth Illman
Editors of Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies

World Congress of Faith Call for Papers

The World Congress of Faiths (WCF) is a community of individuals from different faiths and beliefs working to promote interfaith relations through spiritual dialogue. It organises conferences and lectures designed to stimulate discussion and disseminate new information on this theme.

WCF is seeking papers to be presented at its forthcoming conference:

Meetings of Minds: Conflict, Reconciliation and Inter Faith Relations
Time and Date: 10am to 4pm, Tuesday 10 September 2019
Venue: St Michael’s House, Coventry Cathedral

Keynote speaker: Dr Kristin Aune: ‘How can religious communities or professionals work for mutual respect and understanding in an educational institution?’

We will consider papers on the following and similar themes:

  • What can faith communities learn from studies in reconciliation?
  • Can there be mutual benefit between education for reconciliation and spiritual encounter between faiths?
  • What might a polarised society expect from inter faith relations?
  • Preparing young people for faith diversity
  • Navigating prejudice, toleration, and reconciliation in the global context of inter faith relations and thought

You will be asked to present your own paper and take questions and will have a total of 45 minutes allocated, of which 15 minutes will be for questions.  Papers should reflect original work, which may or may not have been published, and we encourage students to participate. Papers will normally be published in the WCF journal Interreligious Insight after the event.

Reasonable travel expenses will be paid to speakers.

Please send a synopsis of your paper in no more than 200 words together with your affiliation and contact details (term time and home) by Friday 21 June 2019 to: Jenny Kartupelis, jenny@worldfaiths.org<mailto:jenny@worldfaiths.org> If you have any queries, use this email or call on 01223 781781.
WCF: ESSAY AWARD 2019

New Book: “Essays on Secularism and Multiculturalism” by Tariq Modood

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Whether the recently settled religious minorities, Muslims, in particular, can be accommodated as religious groups in European countries has become a central political question and threatens to create long-term fault lines. In this collection of essays Tariq Modood argues that to grasp the nature of the problem we have to see how Muslims have become a target of a cultural racism, Islamophobia. Yet, the problem is not just one of anti-racism but of an understanding of multicultural citizenship, of how minority identities, including those formed by race, ethnicity and religion, can be incorporated into national identities so all can have a sense of belonging together. This means that the tendency amongst some to exclude religious identities from public institutions and the re-making of national identities has to be challenged. Modood suggests that this can be done in a principled yet pragmatic way by drawing on Western Europe’s moderate political secularism and eschewing forms of secularism that offer religious groups a second-class citizenship.

Rowman & Littlefield, 2019

30% Off with Discount Code