International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP)

Dear SISR Colleagues

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce the International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP). You can find more about the IPSP and its ways of working here: https://www.ipsp.org/. You will see that it exists to ‘harness the competence of hundreds of experts about social issues’ and to ‘deliver a report addressed to all social actors, movements, organizations, politicians and decision-makers, in order to provide them with the best expertise on questions that bear on social change’.

We Grace Davie (University of Exeter, UK) and Nancy Ammerman (Boston University, US), are the Coordinating Lead Authors (CLAs) for the chapter on religion, entitled ‘Religions and social progress: Critical assessments and creative partnerships’. Altogether we are a team of twelve. Here is our Abstract:

This chapter starts from the premise that some 80 percent of the world’s population affirms some kind of religious identification, a proportion that is growing rather than declining. Emphasizing the significance of belief and practice in everyday lives and local contexts, we analyze the impact of religion and its relevance to social progress in a wide variety of fields. These include the family, gender and sexuality; differences and diversity; democratic governance; violence and peace-making; health and economic well-being; and care for the earth.

We argue that researchers and policy makers pursuing social progress will benefit from careful attention to the power of religious ideas to motivate, of religious practices to shape ways of life, of religious communities to mobilize and extend the reach of social change, and of religious leaders and symbols to legitimate calls to action. All of that, however, can be put to either good or ill, for which reason assessment of particular religions in specific contexts is essential.

Running through the chapter are five interconnected themes: the persistence of religion in the twenty-first century; the importance of context in discerning outcomes; the need for cultural competence relative to religion; the significance of religion in initiating change; and the benefits of well-judged partnerships. The continuing need for critical but appreciative assessment and the demonstrable benefits of creative partnerships are our standout findings.

The IPSP process – see https://www.ipsp.org/process – mirrors that of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and includes a period of public comment in the autumn of 2016. The ‘Commenting Platform’ is now open – see comment.ipsp.org. It would be hugely helpful if members of SISR could take part in this. The IPSP website will indicate how you access our chapter and how you make your comments. Or if you prefer you can simply send us (g.r.c.davie@exeter.ac.uk; nta@bu.edu) an e-mail.

Call for Presentations: “Music and Islam”

IV UskoMus symposium: ”Music and Islam”
Cultural Centre Stoa, Helsinki 10 November 2016

Call for Presentations

UskoMus* Research Network (uskomus.com) will organise its next one-day symposium with the theme ”Music and Islam”, with islamologist Jonas Otterbeck (Lund University) as a guest speaker. The symposium will be followed by a public discussion and a concert celebrating the 25-year career of the Turkish-Finnish band Nefes (nefes.fi <http://nefes.fi/>), supported by Senegalese Pape Sarr, Rane Diallo, Ismaila Sane and Ousseynou Mbaye, and with an emphasis on Sufi musical practices.
UskoMus hereby invites proposals for symposium presentations, whether in the form of conventional academic papers or more experimental delivery. All topics associated with the general theme are welcome, but please note that the number of presentations is limited. The 200–300-word abstracts should be sent to uskomus.network@gmail.com no later than 30 September 2016; notifications of acceptance will be sent by 14 October.

There will be no conference fee but no free lunches either.

The language of the symposium will be English. The symposium is organised in collaboration with City of Helsinki Cultural Centre Stoa (stoa.fi <http://stoa.fi/>), Etnosoi! Festival (etnosoi.fi<http://etnosoi.fi/>) and Global Music Centre (globalmusic.fi <http://globalmusic.fi/>), Music Archive JAPA (musiikkiarkisto.fi <http://musiikkiarkisto.fi/>) and the Finnish Society for Ethnomusicology (etnomusikologia.fi <http://etnomusikologia.fi/>). For further information, please consult UskoMus website (uskomus.com <http://uskomus.com/>) oruskomus.network@gmail.com <mailto:uskomus-network@gmail.com>.

Welcome to the symposium!

On behalf of UskoMus,
Antti-Ville Kärjä
*) “uskomus” = a belief, a shibboleth; “usko” = faith, confidence; “mus(iikki)” = mus(ic)

Una spiritualità post-secolare

Una spiritualità post-secolare

Padova, 6 giugno 2016

 

Incontro di studio con il sociologo Luigi Berzano e il teologo Giovanni Trabucco,

promosso dalle specializzazioni in teologia spirituale di Fttr e Ftis.

 

 

Si svolgerà quest’anno nella sede padovana l’appuntamento che unisce le specializzazioni in teologia spirituale di Padova e Milano nell’approfondimento di alcuni temi cruciali per il nostro tempo. Una spiritualità post-secolare è il titolo dell’incontro di studio proposto lunedì 6 giugno (Padova, Istituto teologico Sant’Antonio dottore, via San Massimo 25, ore 9.30-13) dal biennio di specializzazione in teologia spirituale della Facoltà teologica del Triveneto e dal Centro studi di spiritualità della Facoltà teologica dell’Italia settentrionale.

Sul tema interverranno Luigi Berzano (sociologo, Università di Torino), con una relazione dal titolo Una spiritualità post-secolare. Provocazioni per il credente, e Giovanni Trabucco (teologo, Facoltà teologica dell’Italia settentrionale-Milano) su Pensiero a-teologico e fede in Dio.

 

Per le scienze delle religioni la spiritualità è oggi, ancor più che religione, una categoria interpretativa delle profonde trasformazioni che la secolarizzazione continua a produrre sia nella scena pubblica che nella sfera personale degli individui. Nelle società contemporanee si moltiplicano nuove forme di spiritualità al di fuori delle grandi tradizioni religiose, con un distacco tra religioni organizzate e spiritualità individuali e con la sperimentazione di altri alfabeti del religioso.

In particolare, il sociologo Luigi Berzano, nel suo ultimo volume Spiritualità senza Dio? apre il nuovo campo di ricerca sulle spiritualità sia di individui che dichiarano di non appartenere a nessuna religione sia di individui che, pur appartenendo a una religione, hanno uno stile di vita che non discende dalla propria tradizione religiosa e vivono parte della loro vita come se Dio non ci fosse, nell’imitazione, spesso, di tendenze, mode, soggetti significativi, mass media. Questa prospettiva entrerà in dialogo con quella della teologia fondamentale, espressa da Giovanni Trabucco, nell’articolazione del nesso tra fede nel vangelo e verità dell’umano, che interroga l’esistenza nella sua ricerca di Dio, nella “perdita” della fede, nello stile di vita cristiano.

 

Per informazioni sul seminario, rivolto particolarmente ai docenti di spiritualità: tel. 049-8200711, email segreteria.spiritualita@fttr.itwww.itsad.it

 

 

 

Symposium: Art Approaching Science and Religion, 12 May 2016, Turku

We warmly welcome you to the symposium Art Approaching Science and
Religion, organized by the Donner Institute and the knowledge
laboratory AmosLAB. The symposium aims at bringing together the fields
of art, science and religion. The lectures are free of charge.

How can science and religion be explored from the perspective of the arts?

Thursday, 12 May 2016 at the Sibelius Museum
Biskopsgatan 17, Åbo/Turku, Finland

08.45 Opening of the Symposium

09.00 Kent Bloomer: “[The Greeks] called it KOSMOS which means ornament”
Response: Pauline von Bonsdorff

11.00 Melissa Raphael: The Creation of Beauty by its Destruction:
Idoloclasm in Modern and Contemporary Jewish Art
Response: Ruth Illman

12.30 Lunch (at own cost)

14.00 Serafim Seppälä: The Temple of Non-Being
Response: Catharina Raudvere

16.00 Mark C. Taylor: The Aesthetic Turn
Response: Esa Saarinen

17.30 Concluding remarks

Welcome!

Organizers: The Donner Institute, AmosLAB, The Hjelt Foundations

Symposium website: http://www.amoslab.fi/?page_id=214

The event on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1119482044782732

RSRC event – Islamophobia in Australia

Western Sydney University

School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Religion and Society Research Cluster

Islamophobia in Australia
The Religion and Society Research Cluster of the School of Social Sciences and Psychology present a symposium on Islamophobia in the Australian context.

Speakers: Emeritus Professor Riaz Hassan (University of SA), Professor Scott Poynting (University of Auckland), and Dr Jennifer Cheng and Dr Oishee Alam (Western Sydney University).

Discussant: Associate Prof Alana Lentin (Western Sydney University).

Date:                    Wednesday 11 May, 2016

Location:             Bankstown Campus, BA: 3.G.55

Time:                    10:00am – 17:00pm

 

Lunch and refreshments will be provided; please RSVP to a.nixon@westernsydney.edu.au with any dietary requirements.

The Frankfurt School and Religion at the Left Forum

The Center for Critical Research on Religion (www.criticaltheoryofreligion.org) which publishes the journal Critical Research on Religion with SAGE Publications (crr.sagepub.com) and the book series “Studies in Critical Research on Religion” with Brill Academic Publishers in hardcover (brill.com/scrr) and Haymarket Books in paperback (www.haymarketbooks.org/category/scrr-series) is pleased to sponsor the following session:

The Frankfurt School and Religion
Left Forum
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
524 West 59th Street
New York, NY
Saturday, May 21, 2016
12:00pm-1:50pm
Room 1.107

Presider and Discussant:

Warren S. Goldstein (Center for Critical Research on Religion and Harvard University, USA)

Panel:

Eduardo Mendieta (Penn State University, USA), “The Axial Age, Social Evolution, and Postsecular Consciousness”

Christopher Craig Brittain (University of Aberdeen, UK), “Elucidating Evangelical Support for Donald Trump: Adorno on Religion and Sectarian Movements”

Matt Sheedy (University of Manitoba, Canada), “”Habermas, Islam, and the Limits of Public Reason”

Session and Conference Details:
http://www.leftforum.org/content/frankfurt-school-and-religion

The Frankfurt School and Religion at the Left Forum

The Center for Critical Research on Religion (www.criticaltheoryofreligion.org) which publishes the journal Critical Research on Religion with SAGE Publications (crr.sagepub.com) and the book series “Studies in Critical Research on Religion” with Brill Academic Publishers in hardcover (brill.com/scrr) and Haymarket Books in paperback (www.haymarketbooks.org/category/scrr-series) is pleased to sponsor the following session:

The Frankfurt School and Religion
Left Forum
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
524 West 59th Street
New York, NY
Saturday, May 21, 2016
12:00pm-1:50pm
Room 1.107

Presider and Discussant:

Warren S. Goldstein (Center for Critical Research on Religion and Harvard University, USA)

Panel:

Eduardo Mendieta (Penn State University, USA), “The Axial Age, Social Evolution, and Postsecular Consciousness”

Christopher Craig Brittain (University of Aberdeen, UK), “Elucidating Evangelical Support for Donald Trump: Adorno on Religion and Sectarian Movements”

Matt Sheedy (University of Manitoba, Canada), “”Habermas, Islam, and the Limits of Public Reason”

Session and Conference Details:
http://www.leftforum.org/content/frankfurt-school-and-religion

Invitation to Public Panel Discussion with Professor Jose Casanova at the Institute for Religion, Politics, & Society

We hope you will be able to join us for a public panel discussion on Global Catholicism, with Professor Jose Casanova, to be held at Australian Catholic University in Melbourne on Friday, May 6.
Information about the event, and a registration link, can be found in the flyer below, as well as here: https://irps.acu.edu.au/events/asia-pacific-catholicism-and-globalization-public-event/
Please circulate this to anyone who may be interested.
irps.acu.edu.au
The project, following the successful model of the Jesuits and Globalization project, gathers a group of experts on different regional and thematic aspects of Asian Catholicism in order to examine jointly and comparatively three sets of questions: a) A comparative historical reconstruction of the development of Asian Catholicism in major Asian countries and Oceania (Korea, …

Symposium: Art Approaching Science and Religion, 12 May 2016, Turku

We warmly welcome you to participate in the symposium Art Approaching
Science and Religion, organized by the Donner Institute and the
knowledge laboratory AmosLAB. The symposium aims at bringing together
the fields of art, science and religion.

How can science and religion be explored from the perspective of the arts?

Thursday, 12 May 2016 at the Sibelius Museum
Biskopsgatan 17, Åbo/Turku, Finland

08.45 Opening of the Symposium: Bengt Kristensson Uggla

09.00 Kent Bloomer: “[The Greeks] called it KOSMOS which means ornament”
Response: Pauline von Bonsdorff

11.00 Melissa Raphael: The Creation of Beauty by its Destruction:
Idoloclasm in Modern and Contemporary Jewish Art
Response: Ruth Illman

12.30 Lunch (at own cost)

14.00 Serafim Seppälä: The Temple of Non-Being
Response: Catharina Raudvere

16.00 Mark C. Taylor: The Aesthetic Turn
Response: Esa Saarinen

17.30 Concluding remarks

The lectures are free of charge. Welcome!

Organizers: The Donner Institute, AmosLAB, The Hjelt Foundations

Symposium website: http://www.amoslab.fi/?page_id=214

You also find the event on facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1119482044782732/_____

Inform Spring Seminar – Registration Now Open!

INFORM SPRING SEMINAR
New Religious Radicalisms

Date – Saturday, 21 May 2016; 9.30am – 5.00pm
Location – New Academic Building, London School of Economics

Registration is now open and can be done using a credit/debit card through PayPal or by posting a booking form and a cheque payable to ‘Inform’ to Inform, Houghton St., London WC2A 2AE. Tickets (including buffet lunch, coffee and tea) paid by 25 April 2016 are £38 each (£18 students/unwaged). Tickets booked after 25 April 2016 will cost £48 each (£28 students/unwaged). 

 

Religion has a long history of radicalism and teachings and/or practices considered extreme by some, or even most. The point of radicalism is that it is a significant departure from norms or traditions. From the extreme acts of mortification of the self by some ascetics to the theologically and politically radical position of the Protestants protesting against what they considered errors inherent in the then dominant Roman Catholic Church, the history of religion is a history of extremes and opposition. It has always provided commentary on the worldly (as well as the other-worldly).

A recent example is the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon by an armed group protesting against the federal management of land, including grazing rights – a political issue. However, the main initiator of the occupation, a Mormon, stated he was compelled to lead this initiative after praying for, and receiving, divine inspiration. Several key figures in this stand-off have cited Mormon scripture as justification for opposing and challenging the federal government. (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has strongly condemned the action.)

Usage and understanding of the terms radical and extreme have changed over time, often to reflect the norms and politics of the era. This seminar will explore new religious radicalisms, and new forms of opposition, with the aim of developing new understandings of such world views.

Speakers will include:

Professor Susan J. Palmer, Dawson College, Montreal

Michael Williamson, London International Christian Church

Dr Alexandra Plows, Research Fellow, Bangor University

Dr Tristan Sturm, Lecturer, Queen’s University Belfast

Shamsher Singh, National Sikh Youth Federation

Professor Eileen Barker, Founder and Chair of Inform