CFP

Dear Members and Friends of The Ritual Year,   


The paper submission for the 14th SIEF congress in Santiago de Compostela, Spain (14-17 April 2019), “Track Changes: Reflecting on a Transforming World” is currently ongoing.

You are all warmly invited to submit your papers to the panel organized by our working group:

(Reli06)
Tracking the ritual year on the move in different cultural settings and systems of values
Convenors: Irina Sedakova and Laurent Fournier


Looking forward to seeing you in Bucharest, in a couple of months, and next year in Santiago,

Irina Stahl,
Researcher, Institute of Sociology, Romanian Academy

Secretary of “The Ritual Year” Working Group,
ritualyear@siefhome.org


The Ritual Year

New publication: Tibetan Medicine, Buddhism and Psychiatry

Dear Colleagues,

*apologies for cross-posting*

 I am happy to announce the publication of my book, Tibetan Medicine, Buddhism and Psychiatry: Mental health and healing in a Tibetan exile community, published by Carolina Academic Press as part of their Ethnographic Studies in Medical Anthropology Series.

 For more information, please visit: https://cap-press.com/books/isbn/9781531001407/Tibetan-Medicine-Buddhism-and-Psychiatry

 The publisher is currently kindly offering a 10% discount on the purchase price when ordered directly from their website.

 Brief description:

This book presents research based on two six-month periods of ethnographic fieldwork conducted within a Tibetan exile community in Darjeeling, northeast India. It utilises four case studies to illustrate lay perceptions of different mental health conditions and their causes and treatments in a culturally- and medically-pluralistic area, juxtaposed with Tibetan textual and biomedical explanations. These explanations combine with background interviews of lay Tibetans, as well as monastic practitioners, Tibetan amchi, and biomedical doctors, to help draw out the complexities of the situation for individuals affected by different experiences of mental illness.

Best wishes,

Susannah

___

Dr Susannah Deane

British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Buddhist Studies
Department of Religion and Theology
School of Humanities
University of Bristol
Book reviews editor, Himalaya and Central Asia section, Asian Medicine: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (JIASTAM)
 

Body, Health and Religion Research Group (BAHAR)
http://www.bodyhealthreligion.org.uk/BAHAR/

Posted in Uncategorized

New publication: Tibetan Medicine, Buddhism and Psychiatry

Dear Colleagues,

*apologies for cross-posting*

 I am happy to announce the publication of my book, Tibetan Medicine, Buddhism and Psychiatry: Mental health and healing in a Tibetan exile community, published by Carolina Academic Press as part of their Ethnographic Studies in Medical Anthropology Series.

 For more information, please visit: https://cap-press.com/books/isbn/9781531001407/Tibetan-Medicine-Buddhism-and-Psychiatry

 The publisher is currently kindly offering a 10% discount on the purchase price when ordered directly from their website.

 Brief description:

This book presents research based on two six-month periods of ethnographic fieldwork conducted within a Tibetan exile community in Darjeeling, northeast India. It utilises four case studies to illustrate lay perceptions of different mental health conditions and their causes and treatments in a culturally- and medically-pluralistic area, juxtaposed with Tibetan textual and biomedical explanations. These explanations combine with background interviews of lay Tibetans, as well as monastic practitioners, Tibetan amchi, and biomedical doctors, to help draw out the complexities of the situation for individuals affected by different experiences of mental illness.

Best wishes,

Susannah

___

Dr Susannah Deane

British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Buddhist Studies
Department of Religion and Theology
School of Humanities
University of Bristol
Book reviews editor, Himalaya and Central Asia section, Asian Medicine: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (JIASTAM)
 

Body, Health and Religion Research Group (BAHAR)
http://www.bodyhealthreligion.org.uk/BAHAR/

Posted in Uncategorized

Thinking about Governance Through Diasporas

Dear colleagues,
I am happy to share that my working paper ‘Thinking about Governance Through Diasporas: Decentering the State and Challenging the External/Internal Binary’ was recently published by the Free University of Berlin’s Collaborative Research Centre “Governance in Areas of Limited Statehood”. The working paper builds on a workshop that was held at the FU Berlin in November 2017 on “Diasporas and Homeland Governance”. It discusses the relationship (or lack thereof) between existing governance and diaspora scholarship and suggests that governance researchers may need to rethink their concepts if they want to better grasp the realities of the contributions that diasporas make to governance in their homelands.
I look forward to any comments and feedback.
Best wishes,
Catherine Craven
Posted in Uncategorized

Thinking about Governance Through Diasporas

Dear colleagues,
I am happy to share that my working paper ‘Thinking about Governance Through Diasporas: Decentering the State and Challenging the External/Internal Binary’ was recently published by the Free University of Berlin’s Collaborative Research Centre “Governance in Areas of Limited Statehood”. The working paper builds on a workshop that was held at the FU Berlin in November 2017 on “Diasporas and Homeland Governance”. It discusses the relationship (or lack thereof) between existing governance and diaspora scholarship and suggests that governance researchers may need to rethink their concepts if they want to better grasp the realities of the contributions that diasporas make to governance in their homelands.
I look forward to any comments and feedback.
Best wishes,
Catherine Craven
Posted in Uncategorized

Call for chapters: Religious urbanization and Development in Africa

Religious urbanization and

moral economies of development in Africa

Call for Chapter Submissions

Abstracts are invited for an interdisciplinary volume on Religion urbanization and moral economies of development in Africa,edited by David Garbin (University of Kent), Simon Coleman (University of Toronto) and Gareth Millington (University of York). The volume will critically explore how processes related to religious urbanization intersect with different notions of development in African contexts. Cities are taken to be powerful venues for the creation and implementation of models of development whose moral, temporal, and political assumptions need to be examined, not least as they intersect with religious templates for the planning and reform of urban space.

The themes and problematics to be discussed in this volume reflect the broader focus of the Religious Urbanization in Africa project (see https://rua-project.ac.uk/). These include (but are not limited to):

  • The ways urban faith-based practices of ‘development’ – through for example the provision of basic infrastructure, utilities, housing, health and educational facilities – link moral subjectivities with individual and wider narratives/aspirations of modernization, change, deliverance or prosperity
  • The ideals of belonging and citizenship promoted by religious visions of the ‘ideal city’ and how these are materially articulated in concrete urban developments
  • How models of infrastructural development mobilized by religious actors may conflict or cohere with existing regimes of planning in specific urban contexts as well as with international development discourses
  • The ways in which religious actors and groups may provide resources to negotiate unpredictability and socio-economic uncertainties through production of urban/infrastructural space

We welcome empirically-grounded qualitative case studies or comparative approaches (including but not limited to Islam or Christianity), in particular chapters linking urban change in African context(s), religious place-making, and ‘development’ discourses and practices at various scales.

The proposal for this volume has been invited for the Bloomsbury book series, ‘Studies in Religion, Space and Place’.

 

Please submit abstracts of up to 300 words no later than 20 November 2018 to ruaproject@kent.ac.uk

 

Accepted chapters in full (6000-7000 words) will be due by 1 June 2019.

 

 

Call for chapters: Religious urbanization and Development in Africa

Religious urbanization and

moral economies of development in Africa

Call for Chapter Submissions

Abstracts are invited for an interdisciplinary volume on Religion urbanization and moral economies of development in Africa,edited by David Garbin (University of Kent), Simon Coleman (University of Toronto) and Gareth Millington (University of York). The volume will critically explore how processes related to religious urbanization intersect with different notions of development in African contexts. Cities are taken to be powerful venues for the creation and implementation of models of development whose moral, temporal, and political assumptions need to be examined, not least as they intersect with religious templates for the planning and reform of urban space.

The themes and problematics to be discussed in this volume reflect the broader focus of the Religious Urbanization in Africa project (see https://rua-project.ac.uk/). These include (but are not limited to):

  • The ways urban faith-based practices of ‘development’ – through for example the provision of basic infrastructure, utilities, housing, health and educational facilities – link moral subjectivities with individual and wider narratives/aspirations of modernization, change, deliverance or prosperity
  • The ideals of belonging and citizenship promoted by religious visions of the ‘ideal city’ and how these are materially articulated in concrete urban developments
  • How models of infrastructural development mobilized by religious actors may conflict or cohere with existing regimes of planning in specific urban contexts as well as with international development discourses
  • The ways in which religious actors and groups may provide resources to negotiate unpredictability and socio-economic uncertainties through production of urban/infrastructural space

We welcome empirically-grounded qualitative case studies or comparative approaches (including but not limited to Islam or Christianity), in particular chapters linking urban change in African context(s), religious place-making, and ‘development’ discourses and practices at various scales.

The proposal for this volume has been invited for the Bloomsbury book series, ‘Studies in Religion, Space and Place’.

 

Please submit abstracts of up to 300 words no later than 20 November 2018 to ruaproject@kent.ac.uk

 

Accepted chapters in full (6000-7000 words) will be due by 1 June 2019.

 

 

Your are invited to a Panel Discussion on Wael Hallaq’s new book ‘Restating Orientalism

What: A Panel Discussion with Wael Hallaq on his new book ‘Restating Orientalism – A Critique of Modern Knowledge’

When: Friday, 5 October, 2018 from 5:00pm to 7:00pm (Time zone: London)

Where: Room 8&9, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge

Convenor: Dr. Humeira Iqtidar, Kings College London

Discussants:

·         Professor Wael Hallaq (Columbia University)

·         Professor Sarah Radcliffe (Geography)

·         Professor Khalid Fahmy (FAMES)

The panel will discuss with Wael Hallaq, the import of his latest book ‘Restating Orientalism – A Critique of Modern Knowledge’

Wael hallaq's new book 'Restating Orientalism'

https://cup-us.imgix.net/covers/9780231187626.jpg?w=350

Since Edward Said’s foundational work, Orientalism has been singled out for critique as the quintessential example of Western intellectuals’ collaboration with oppression. Controversies over the imbrications of knowledge and power and the complicity of Orientalism in the larger project of colonialism have been waged among generations of scholars. But has Orientalism come to stand in for all of the sins of European modernity, at the cost of neglecting the complicity of the rest of the academic disciplines?

In this landmark theoretical investigation, Wael B. Hallaq reevaluates and deepens the critique of Orientalism in order to deploy it for rethinking the foundations of the modern project. Refusing to isolate or scapegoat Orientalism, Restating Orientalism extends the critique to other fields, from law, philosophy, and scientific inquiry to core ideas in modern thought such as sovereignty and the self. Hallaq traces their involvement in colonialism, mass annihilation, and systematic destruction of the natural world, interrogating and historicizing the set of causes that permitted modernity to wed knowledge to power. Restating Orientalism offers a bold rethinking of the theory of the author, the concept of sovereignty, and the place of the secular Western self in the modern project, reopening the problem of power and knowledge to an ethical critique and ultimately theorizing an exit from modernity’s predicaments.

Entry is free and this event is open to members of the public

Event exported from Teamup

Posted in Uncategorized

Your are invited to a Panel Discussion on Wael Hallaq’s new book ‘Restating Orientalism

What: A Panel Discussion with Wael Hallaq on his new book ‘Restating Orientalism – A Critique of Modern Knowledge’

When: Friday, 5 October, 2018 from 5:00pm to 7:00pm (Time zone: London)

Where: Room 8&9, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge

Convenor: Dr. Humeira Iqtidar, Kings College London

Discussants:

·         Professor Wael Hallaq (Columbia University)

·         Professor Sarah Radcliffe (Geography)

·         Professor Khalid Fahmy (FAMES)

The panel will discuss with Wael Hallaq, the import of his latest book ‘Restating Orientalism – A Critique of Modern Knowledge’

Wael hallaq's new book 'Restating Orientalism'

https://cup-us.imgix.net/covers/9780231187626.jpg?w=350

Since Edward Said’s foundational work, Orientalism has been singled out for critique as the quintessential example of Western intellectuals’ collaboration with oppression. Controversies over the imbrications of knowledge and power and the complicity of Orientalism in the larger project of colonialism have been waged among generations of scholars. But has Orientalism come to stand in for all of the sins of European modernity, at the cost of neglecting the complicity of the rest of the academic disciplines?

In this landmark theoretical investigation, Wael B. Hallaq reevaluates and deepens the critique of Orientalism in order to deploy it for rethinking the foundations of the modern project. Refusing to isolate or scapegoat Orientalism, Restating Orientalism extends the critique to other fields, from law, philosophy, and scientific inquiry to core ideas in modern thought such as sovereignty and the self. Hallaq traces their involvement in colonialism, mass annihilation, and systematic destruction of the natural world, interrogating and historicizing the set of causes that permitted modernity to wed knowledge to power. Restating Orientalism offers a bold rethinking of the theory of the author, the concept of sovereignty, and the place of the secular Western self in the modern project, reopening the problem of power and knowledge to an ethical critique and ultimately theorizing an exit from modernity’s predicaments.

Entry is free and this event is open to members of the public

Event exported from Teamup

Posted in Uncategorized