Call for Papers: “Approaching Ethnoheterogenesis. Membership, Ethnicity, and Social Change in Contemporary Societies”.

 Organization: Prof. Dr. Mathias Bös, PD Dr. Nina Clara Tiesler, and Deborah Sielert. Institute of Sociology, Leibniz University of Hannover (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Soziologie – Sektion Migration und ethnische Minderheiten)

Email to: n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de

Venue: Hannover Leibnizhaus

Date: Thursday and Friday, December 12th and 13th, 2017   

The study of societal change and ethnic relations has been a core pursuit in Sociology, both in the past and in the present, especially – though not exclusively – in historical contexts marked by heightened migration. This conference aims to refine the theoretical understanding of social and cultural processes regarding the formation of ethnicities and ethnic diversity (Yancey et al 1976, Bös 2010).

The specific contribution of this conference goes to the research context of migrants and migrant descendants; wherein conceptual debates on self-perceptions, modes of belonging, group formation, and collective subjectivities continue to be at the core of theoretical considerations (Cohen 1974, Glazer and Moynihan 1975, Banton 2008). Importantly, the conference also goes beyond this context: studying the genesis and continuously shifting social forms of ethnicities is heuristically important in that it can help us clarify processes of socio-, cultural-, and political change in society at large (Bell 1975, Bös 2011, Banton 2011).

Researching the emergence of ethnicities has a long tradition in diverse social sciences and in the humanities. The term ethnogenesis originally described constitutive processes of ethnic groups, their possible fissions, de-ethnization, expansion, or new formations over time and space (Singer 1962, Voss 2008). From the mid-1970s onward, in American Sociology, ethnogenesis was also used to grasp societal assimilation, integration, and change caused by ethnic diversification (Greeley 1974), as such describing socio-cultural change among both minority and majority groupings and in society at large.

However, it appears that current analytical concepts and frameworks to describe the genesis of ethnicities and societal change through ethnic diversification are too limited to grasp these complex and multi-dimensional formative processes (Barth 1969, Fardon 1987, Thompson 2011, Bös 2015). These concepts (e.g., assimilation, identity, integration, diversity, inclusion, multi-ethnic societies, etc.) often represent normative self-descriptions by civil society rather than analytical categories of heuristic value. Therefore, we propose the concept of Ethnoheterogenesis (EHG) as a starting point to discuss multidimensional models of specific forms of societization (Vergesellschaftung), which involve ethnic framing and affiliations of individuals, groupings, and macro groups (Tiesler 2015). Rather than reducing such formative processes to linear models, new concepts such a Ethnoheterogenesis explicitly address the dialectic of homogenization and heterogenization in the genesis of ethnicities, as well as the normality of de-ethnization and multiple options regarding ethnic affiliation (Waters 1990).

The aim of the conference is to further develop EHG or other new alternatives as analytical categories for processes of socio-cultural change in complex settings of transnationally constituted societies that can be coined ethnoheterogeneous (Claussen 2013). We invite international scholars for a critical discussion in favor of further theorizing. Conceptual papers and empirical studies referring to the following themes are welcome:

  1. What changes in ethnic framing, ethnic affiliation, and multiplicity of memberships/belongings can be observed in current times of heightened mobility and how can they be analyzed?

What can be said about ethnicity as a resource for individualization, collectivization, and community building or potential counterhegemonic cultures?

– What forms of “past presencing” can be reconstructed in the processes of ethno(hetero)genesis?

– What does the analysis of the genesis and changes of ethnic framing and multiplicity of memberships add to the broader field of sociology (i.e., Sociology of Migration, Global Sociology, and Sociology of the Nation State)?

  1. How are the processes of (de-)ethnization interwoven with social inequality (economic, legal, political, etc.)?

– What role do institutions such as the family, neighborhoods, work, or communities play in this context?

– How should we think about the genesis of ethnicities in the intersection with and relation to different categories of social inequality, and most importantly race, gender, class, and/or generation?

  1. How does ethnicity function as an element in the structuring of (world) society?

– What can be said about the (changing) role of the nation in the emergence of ethnicities and membership roles?

What is the role of spatial configuration, such as transnationalism, in the genesis of ethnicities?

What insights can be gained from related fields such as diaspora or transnational studies?

Keynote Speakers:      

·        Nadje Al-Ali, Centre for Gender Studies, SOAS

·        Thomas D. Hall, Prof. Emeritus, Department of History, DePauw University

 

We are looking forward to proposals for lectures and/or workshops. The abstracts (one page long) should include the question, empirical/theoretical background, hypothesis, and brief personal details. Please send your proposals or abstracts to n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de
ABSTRACTS DUE: June 15, 2017

Call for Papers: “Approaching Ethnoheterogenesis. Membership, Ethnicity, and Social Change in Contemporary Societies”.

 Organization: Prof. Dr. Mathias Bös, PD Dr. Nina Clara Tiesler, and Deborah Sielert. Institute of Sociology, Leibniz University of Hannover (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Soziologie – Sektion Migration und ethnische Minderheiten)

Email to: n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de

Venue: Hannover Leibnizhaus

Date: Thursday and Friday, December 12th and 13th, 2017   

The study of societal change and ethnic relations has been a core pursuit in Sociology, both in the past and in the present, especially – though not exclusively – in historical contexts marked by heightened migration. This conference aims to refine the theoretical understanding of social and cultural processes regarding the formation of ethnicities and ethnic diversity (Yancey et al 1976, Bös 2010).

The specific contribution of this conference goes to the research context of migrants and migrant descendants; wherein conceptual debates on self-perceptions, modes of belonging, group formation, and collective subjectivities continue to be at the core of theoretical considerations (Cohen 1974, Glazer and Moynihan 1975, Banton 2008). Importantly, the conference also goes beyond this context: studying the genesis and continuously shifting social forms of ethnicities is heuristically important in that it can help us clarify processes of socio-, cultural-, and political change in society at large (Bell 1975, Bös 2011, Banton 2011).

Researching the emergence of ethnicities has a long tradition in diverse social sciences and in the humanities. The term ethnogenesis originally described constitutive processes of ethnic groups, their possible fissions, de-ethnization, expansion, or new formations over time and space (Singer 1962, Voss 2008). From the mid-1970s onward, in American Sociology, ethnogenesis was also used to grasp societal assimilation, integration, and change caused by ethnic diversification (Greeley 1974), as such describing socio-cultural change among both minority and majority groupings and in society at large.

However, it appears that current analytical concepts and frameworks to describe the genesis of ethnicities and societal change through ethnic diversification are too limited to grasp these complex and multi-dimensional formative processes (Barth 1969, Fardon 1987, Thompson 2011, Bös 2015). These concepts (e.g., assimilation, identity, integration, diversity, inclusion, multi-ethnic societies, etc.) often represent normative self-descriptions by civil society rather than analytical categories of heuristic value. Therefore, we propose the concept of Ethnoheterogenesis (EHG) as a starting point to discuss multidimensional models of specific forms of societization (Vergesellschaftung), which involve ethnic framing and affiliations of individuals, groupings, and macro groups (Tiesler 2015). Rather than reducing such formative processes to linear models, new concepts such a Ethnoheterogenesis explicitly address the dialectic of homogenization and heterogenization in the genesis of ethnicities, as well as the normality of de-ethnization and multiple options regarding ethnic affiliation (Waters 1990).

The aim of the conference is to further develop EHG or other new alternatives as analytical categories for processes of socio-cultural change in complex settings of transnationally constituted societies that can be coined ethnoheterogeneous (Claussen 2013). We invite international scholars for a critical discussion in favor of further theorizing. Conceptual papers and empirical studies referring to the following themes are welcome:

  1. What changes in ethnic framing, ethnic affiliation, and multiplicity of memberships/belongings can be observed in current times of heightened mobility and how can they be analyzed?

What can be said about ethnicity as a resource for individualization, collectivization, and community building or potential counterhegemonic cultures?

– What forms of “past presencing” can be reconstructed in the processes of ethno(hetero)genesis?

– What does the analysis of the genesis and changes of ethnic framing and multiplicity of memberships add to the broader field of sociology (i.e., Sociology of Migration, Global Sociology, and Sociology of the Nation State)?

  1. How are the processes of (de-)ethnization interwoven with social inequality (economic, legal, political, etc.)?

– What role do institutions such as the family, neighborhoods, work, or communities play in this context?

– How should we think about the genesis of ethnicities in the intersection with and relation to different categories of social inequality, and most importantly race, gender, class, and/or generation?

  1. How does ethnicity function as an element in the structuring of (world) society?

– What can be said about the (changing) role of the nation in the emergence of ethnicities and membership roles?

What is the role of spatial configuration, such as transnationalism, in the genesis of ethnicities?

What insights can be gained from related fields such as diaspora or transnational studies?

Keynote Speakers:      

·        Nadje Al-Ali, Centre for Gender Studies, SOAS

·        Thomas D. Hall, Prof. Emeritus, Department of History, DePauw University

 

We are looking forward to proposals for lectures and/or workshops. The abstracts (one page long) should include the question, empirical/theoretical background, hypothesis, and brief personal details. Please send your proposals or abstracts to n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de
ABSTRACTS DUE: June 15, 2017

Publication Announcement: Approaching Religion Vol. 7/1 (April, 2017)

Approaching Religion

Available April 2017

Theme: Interreligious dialogue in Asia
Guest Editor: Professor Lionel Obadia

AR is an open access journal published by the Donner Institute. Its
purpose is to publish current research on religion and culture and to
offer a platform for scholarly co-operation and debate within these
fields. The articles have been selected on the basis of peer-review.

Approaching Religion
Vol 7, No 1 (2017)

Table of Contents

Editorial

Religious diversity (1)
Lionel Obadia & Ruth Illman

Review article

Comparing ‘religious diversities’. Looking Eastward: (Asia) beyond the
West (2-9)
Lionel Obadia

Articles

Diversity and elite religiosity in modern China. A model (10-20)
Vincent Goossaert

Religious diversity and patrimonialization. A case study of the Nianli
Festival in Leizhou Peninsula, China (21-31)
Shanshan Zheng

Traditional and modern crossing process exchange in a Buddhist-Muslim
society. Case studied: Zangskar valley in the great Indian Himalayas (32-45)
Salomé Deboos

Becoming Christians. Prayers and subject formation in an urban church in
China (46-54)
Jianbo Huang & Mengyin Hu

Dr Ruth Illman /Dr. Ruth Illman
Föreståndare, Donnerska institutet /Director, the Donner Institute
Docent i religionsvetenskap, Åbo Akademi/ Docent of Comparative Religion, Åbo Akademi University

Publication Announcement: Approaching Religion Vol. 7/1 (April, 2017)

Approaching Religion

Available April 2017

Theme: Interreligious dialogue in Asia
Guest Editor: Professor Lionel Obadia

AR is an open access journal published by the Donner Institute. Its
purpose is to publish current research on religion and culture and to
offer a platform for scholarly co-operation and debate within these
fields. The articles have been selected on the basis of peer-review.

Approaching Religion
Vol 7, No 1 (2017)

Table of Contents

Editorial

Religious diversity (1)
Lionel Obadia & Ruth Illman

Review article

Comparing ‘religious diversities’. Looking Eastward: (Asia) beyond the
West (2-9)
Lionel Obadia

Articles

Diversity and elite religiosity in modern China. A model (10-20)
Vincent Goossaert

Religious diversity and patrimonialization. A case study of the Nianli
Festival in Leizhou Peninsula, China (21-31)
Shanshan Zheng

Traditional and modern crossing process exchange in a Buddhist-Muslim
society. Case studied: Zangskar valley in the great Indian Himalayas (32-45)
Salomé Deboos

Becoming Christians. Prayers and subject formation in an urban church in
China (46-54)
Jianbo Huang & Mengyin Hu

Dr Ruth Illman /Dr. Ruth Illman
Föreståndare, Donnerska institutet /Director, the Donner Institute
Docent i religionsvetenskap, Åbo Akademi/ Docent of Comparative Religion, Åbo Akademi University

Call for Manuscripts: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion

Volume 10: Interreligious Dialogue:
From Religion to Geopolitics
Forthcoming 2019

Edited by:
Giuseppe Giordan (University of Padua, Italy) and
Andrew P. Lynch (University of Sydney, Australia)

The topic of interreligious dialogue is of critical importance at a
time of increasing geopolitical tension.  The urgency for developing
better analytical tools for understanding interreligious dialogue is
underscored by widespread concerns about religion and violence, and
the security culture that this has given rise to in a number of nation
states.  Furthermore, globalization, technological developments, mass
migration, and recent political upheavals and the narratives of
the exclusion that has been associated with them, highlights the need for
greater levels of communication between religious groups.  This volume
seeks to investigate interreligious dialogue as a necessary component
of global affairs in post-secular times, and in multi-faith societies
facing increasing levels of cultural pluralism.

To explore these issues we propose to include articles on the
following themes, from the perspective of a range of different
religions:

  1. Changing viewpoints and theories in the study of interreligious dialogue
  2. Interreligious dialogue and politics in the context of globalization
  3. Interreligious dialogue and debates about secularism and post-secularism
  4. Interreligious dialogue in the context of social diversity,
    cultural pluralism, and multi-faith societies
  5. Interreligious dialogue and emerging information technologies
  6. Interreligious dialogue in an age of terrorism
  7. Interreligious dialogue and migration

Please send all proposals (300 words) to andrew.lynch@sydney.edu.au

Deadlines:
Submission of proposals: July 30, 2017
Notification of acceptance: September 30, 2017
Completed manuscripts (7,000 words): June 30, 2018

Call for Manuscripts: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion

Volume 10: Interreligious Dialogue:
From Religion to Geopolitics
Forthcoming 2019

Edited by:
Giuseppe Giordan (University of Padua, Italy) and
Andrew P. Lynch (University of Sydney, Australia)

The topic of interreligious dialogue is of critical importance at a
time of increasing geopolitical tension.  The urgency for developing
better analytical tools for understanding interreligious dialogue is
underscored by widespread concerns about religion and violence, and
the security culture that this has given rise to in a number of nation
states.  Furthermore, globalization, technological developments, mass
migration, and recent political upheavals and the narratives of
the exclusion that has been associated with them, highlights the need for
greater levels of communication between religious groups.  This volume
seeks to investigate interreligious dialogue as a necessary component
of global affairs in post-secular times, and in multi-faith societies
facing increasing levels of cultural pluralism.

To explore these issues we propose to include articles on the
following themes, from the perspective of a range of different
religions:

  1. Changing viewpoints and theories in the study of interreligious dialogue
  2. Interreligious dialogue and politics in the context of globalization
  3. Interreligious dialogue and debates about secularism and post-secularism
  4. Interreligious dialogue in the context of social diversity,
    cultural pluralism, and multi-faith societies
  5. Interreligious dialogue and emerging information technologies
  6. Interreligious dialogue in an age of terrorism
  7. Interreligious dialogue and migration

Please send all proposals (300 words) to andrew.lynch@sydney.edu.au

Deadlines:
Submission of proposals: July 30, 2017
Notification of acceptance: September 30, 2017
Completed manuscripts (7,000 words): June 30, 2018

Call for Papers: Religion and the Social Order

Call For Book Proposals
Religion and the Social Order
A Book Series from Brill Academic Publishers and the Association for the Sociology of Religion

We are now seeking book proposals for Religion And The Social Order book series. The series was initiated by the Association for the Sociology of Religion (ASR), which is an international scholarly association that seeks to advance theory and research in the sociology of religion. The aim of Religion and the Social Order (RESO) is to publish edited volumes or single topic monographs that center around a particular set of current interests within the sociology of religion. It specifically aims to advance theory and research within this field of study. The series seeks to publish at least one volume per year. Under the auspices of the Association for the Sociology of Religion, RESO has been published by Brill since 2004 and under the General Editorship of Inger Furseth since 2016.  Please view the full Call For Proposals and find out more about the Manuscript Proposal Guidelines.

General Editor:
Inger Furseth, University of Oslo, Norway

Editorial Committee:
Lori Beaman, University of Ottawa, Canada
Michele Dillon, University of New Hampshire, USA
David Herbert, Kingston University London, UK
Juan Marco Vaggione, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina
Rhys Williams, Loyola University, Chicago, USA
Melissa M. Wilcox, University of California at Riverside, USA

Visit the Series on the Brill Website

Call for Papers: The Centre for Education for Racial Equality

Third Call for Papers ‘Activism and antiracism in education: telling our stories’

Biennial Conference, 14-16 June 2017

Moray House School of Education, Edinburgh

Keynote speakers:

Professor Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Duke University, Racism in a Post-Racial America

Professor Gloria Wekker, University of Utrecht, White Innocence in the Dutch Academy

Professor Robert Phillipson, University of Copenhagen, Global English, an imperialist project?

Professor Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Anti-Linguicist and Pro-Linguistic-Human.Rights Education – what, why and how?

Conference themes:

(1) Reclaiming teacher activism/political literacy

It is hard for teachers to be part of a system that recreates the inequalities of society and, at the same time, to try and change that system. One indication of the challenge is the recognition by advocates of a social justice approach to teacher education that being “critical” is not enough and that teachers have a responsibility to act as agents of social change. For this to become reality, teachers need to be able to consider how change can come about in their context, what obstacles need to be overcome and how specific issues of discrimination relate to wider influences in society. This strand welcomes proposals from teachers and teacher educators who have stories to tell of anti-racist activism. We hope to draw lessons about how a political understanding of society helps teacher activists to be agents of change.

(2) The power of intergenerational activism and solidarity

Racism and discrimination shape the experiences of different generational groups in specific ways. Inequalities develop in complex ways across the lifecourse, and while generational interests sometimes appear in tension, global events have shown that there is a need for intergenerational solidarity and activism in order to address persisting inequalities of race and other categories. Intergenerational relationships are a key site of both reproducing and challenging race and other inequalities, whether in professional relationships – e.g. working with children and young people – or in personal relationships within families and communities.

This stream welcomes contributions that explore the experiences of racism and other forms of discrimination of different generational groups, give voice to generational groups that are silenced, and link these to intergenerational activism and social change.

(3) Countering monolingual hegemony in education

Globalisation and migratory forces have resulted in ever increasing linguistic diversity in contemporary educational contexts. Yet dominant language policies frequently ignore the realities of multilingual classrooms and conceptualise/position speakers of indigenous, heritage and regional languages as a problem rather than as a resource. This stream welcomes papers examining ways in which educators and community activists disrupt prevailing monolingual ideologies by creating spaces where learning takes place in two or more languages both inside and outside of schools, colleges, universities, and community and adult education. It also encourages contributions concerning ways in which children and young people take a critical stance towards the role of languages in any educational context and actively participate in translanguaging/ multilingual practices for educational purposes.

(4) Decolonising the curriculum

The masters’ tools will never dismantle the master’s house – Audre Lorde Countering dominant hegemony and narratives require different strategies. Inserting new inputs into the curriculum (tinkering) can leave existing curriculum largely unchanged. Decolonisation is about dismantling, requiring critical reflective thinking and a robust understanding of how European and Western knowledge, language and power structures have shaped curriculum. Decolonising the curriculum also calls for a re-theorising of the history, contributions and experiences of black, minority and indigenous peoples, thereby desanitising what is remembered. This strand welcomes papers by educators (school, college and university, community and adult education) who have looked at reframing curriculum and problemmatised the nature of knowledge.

Abstracts:

Abstracts for papers relating to one or more of these themes are welcomed. Abstracts of 250-300 words should be submitted to ceresconference2017@ed.ac.uk by Friday 28th April 2017. Abstracts will be peer reviewed by the CERES co-director team, and applicants will be notified of abstract acceptance by Friday 12th May 2017.

For further information please contact: The Centre for Education for Racial Equality in Scotland, The University of Edinburgh, Moray House School of Education Room B.04 Old Moray House Holyrood Road Edinburgh, UK. EH8 8AQ. Tel: +44(0)131 651 6371; Email: ceresconference2017@ed.ac.uk