Call for Papers: Deportation as Friction

Call for papers ‘Deportation as friction’

Panel at the Second Transmobilities & Development Conference: Friction in a mobile world, Radboud University, Nijmegen, 8-9 June, 2017

Panel organizers: Nauja Kleist, Danish Institute for International Studies, nkl@diis.dk & Heike Drotbohm, Department of Anthropology and African Studies, University of Mainz, Drotbohm@uni-mainz.de

Deportation has become an increasingly utilized migration management instrument, aiming at deterring migration, expelling unwanted aliens and signaling a given state’s tough stand on immigration to domestic constituencies. This panel has its objective to examine the implications of deportation for deportees and the institutions and states engaged in deportation, with particular focus on the interactions and connections occurring between them. We thereby wish to study deportation as friction, understood as precarious and disrupted interconnections (Tsing 2005) in a situation characterized by stratified globalization, a diversification of migration industries (Gammeltoft-Hansen and Sørensen 2013) and restrictive mobility regimes.

To illuminate these perspectives, we call for papers focusing on how different actors practice, govern and perceive deportation at different moments and locations along the so-called ‘deportation corridor’ (Drotbohm & Hasselberg 2015), which covers different places, actors and institution. We are particularly interested in presentations that tackle the diverse and conflicting social interactions between deportees and their social networks, institutions, entrepreneurs, laws and technologies that are part and parcel of the forceful route of involuntary return. These include:

  • Deportability: How do authorities govern, practice and stage deportability (Peutz and Genova 2010)
  • the constant but not necessarily realized threat of deportation ? Which impact has the condition of deportability on migrants and their perception of (im-)mobility and (potential) transnational life worlds? How do they respond to institutional requirements and constraints?
  • Detention: what migration industries emerge and are involved in detention? Which technologies do they employ and what kinds of subjects do they (attempt to) create? How do detainees interact and differentiate themselves under this condition of institutional constraint?
  • Removal: What types of institutions and migration industries are involved in different types of removal processes? What materialities and technologies of constraint, escort, communication and transportation do they employ? What are the interactions between deporting agents and deportees?
  • Post-deportation: Which institutional interactions and frameworks do deportees face or approach after their deportation? How is their deportation perceived and managed by authorities and national or local institutions? What is the role of transnational practices and networks after deportation?

Practicalities

Please send a maximum 200 word abstract to both of us by April 7 at Drotbohm@uni-mainz.de and nkl@diis.dk. We will select abstracts no later than April 24.

Please note that participation in the workshop is free but participants have to cover their own expenses.

Call for Papers: Deportation as Friction

Call for papers ‘Deportation as friction’

Panel at the Second Transmobilities & Development Conference: Friction in a mobile world, Radboud University, Nijmegen, 8-9 June, 2017

Panel organizers: Nauja Kleist, Danish Institute for International Studies, nkl@diis.dk & Heike Drotbohm, Department of Anthropology and African Studies, University of Mainz, Drotbohm@uni-mainz.de

Deportation has become an increasingly utilized migration management instrument, aiming at deterring migration, expelling unwanted aliens and signaling a given state’s tough stand on immigration to domestic constituencies. This panel has its objective to examine the implications of deportation for deportees and the institutions and states engaged in deportation, with particular focus on the interactions and connections occurring between them. We thereby wish to study deportation as friction, understood as precarious and disrupted interconnections (Tsing 2005) in a situation characterized by stratified globalization, a diversification of migration industries (Gammeltoft-Hansen and Sørensen 2013) and restrictive mobility regimes.

To illuminate these perspectives, we call for papers focusing on how different actors practice, govern and perceive deportation at different moments and locations along the so-called ‘deportation corridor’ (Drotbohm & Hasselberg 2015), which covers different places, actors and institution. We are particularly interested in presentations that tackle the diverse and conflicting social interactions between deportees and their social networks, institutions, entrepreneurs, laws and technologies that are part and parcel of the forceful route of involuntary return. These include:

  • Deportability: How do authorities govern, practice and stage deportability (Peutz and Genova 2010)
  • the constant but not necessarily realized threat of deportation ? Which impact has the condition of deportability on migrants and their perception of (im-)mobility and (potential) transnational life worlds? How do they respond to institutional requirements and constraints?
  • Detention: what migration industries emerge and are involved in detention? Which technologies do they employ and what kinds of subjects do they (attempt to) create? How do detainees interact and differentiate themselves under this condition of institutional constraint?
  • Removal: What types of institutions and migration industries are involved in different types of removal processes? What materialities and technologies of constraint, escort, communication and transportation do they employ? What are the interactions between deporting agents and deportees?
  • Post-deportation: Which institutional interactions and frameworks do deportees face or approach after their deportation? How is their deportation perceived and managed by authorities and national or local institutions? What is the role of transnational practices and networks after deportation?

Practicalities

Please send a maximum 200 word abstract to both of us by April 7 at Drotbohm@uni-mainz.de and nkl@diis.dk. We will select abstracts no later than April 24.

Please note that participation in the workshop is free but participants have to cover their own expenses.

Call for Papers: Religious Feminism and Feminist Spirituality

Religious Feminism and Feminist Spirituality

Call for contributions for the colloquium on the 28th of November 2017 and for NQF 38/1

Coordination: Irene Becci, Helene Fueger, Catherine Fussinger et Amel Mahfoud

Denounced as fundamentally oppressive systems for women, monotheistic religions have been the subject of strong criticism from feminist movements in the West. The traditions most targeted by these criticisms were first those from which most Western feminists had come from, namely Christianity and Judaism (especially in North America). As for the theme of Islam and feminism, it is a particularly complex question today because the issue of the place of women within Islam was very quickly instrumentalized in the colonial context. If the three monotheistic traditions have been criticized for promoting social organization and discriminatory values against women in civil society, their internal functioning has also been called into question (difficulty or even impossibility for women to occupy positions of authority within religious institutions, but also to access texts and places of worship, as well as certain rites).

From these criticisms – but in a much broader context of putting religion into question – the following idea imposed itself: real advances in feminism required renouncing all forms of religious or spiritual beliefs and practices, which were considered to be necessarily alienating. From this point of view, women’s struggle could not be advanced without a strong retreat, even a disappearance, of all religions. For many, Western feminism appears to have had secularization as both a condition of possibility and as a result. In other words, Western feminism is connected to the loss of social influence of religion within modern institutions and a significant decrease in religious affiliation and practice. The relationships between feminism, spirituality and religion, however, deserve to be considered from another perspective today for two reasons.

First, while in the West modernity seemed for a time to imply the disappearance of religion, sociologists and politicians are reconsidering this vision since the end of the 20th century and thematize the “reconfigurations” and / or the “return” of religions within Western societies. Their analyzes are not, however, univocal. Some insist on the radical manifestations of such a return into public space, in the form of fundamentalist movements, particularly within Christianity and Islam. Other research underlines the individualization of the relationship with religion, or highlights the emergence of “new religious movements”, of New Age spiritualities, or other spiritual practices – which interest many more women than men – of various exotic inspirations. Within the academic field, therefore, approaches to religion and spirituality attempt to take account of the complexity of what the term “religion” and “secular” encompass at a sociological level. It is in this context that the historian and gender studies specialist Joan Scott (2009) recently considered it necessary to question the relationship between secularization and emancipation of women, which, according to her, has no historical linearity. The second reason which justifies approaching the relationship between religions, spiritualities and feminisms from a different perspective lies in the existence, often little known in Francophone circles, of the structuring of a feminist critique “from the inside” carried out by women who hold to both their feminist posture and their religious or spiritual commitment. Such a phenomenon was first observed in Christianity and Judaism in the 1960s and 1970s, then a clear feminist dimension emerged in various new religious movements (Wicca, the cult of the great goddess, etc.), and later certain Muslim feminisms emerged and became diffused.

The targets of these religious feminisms are diverse and their demands may take the path of cautious reformism or that of a radical confrontation (an appreciation that must always be contextualized according to the religious framework, some being more constraining than others). Thus, at the level of “work” within religious institutions, some have demanded a better recognition of the functions and activities predominantly occupied by women. Others, from the outset, have demanded access for women to central positions in the exercise of their religion, positions to which they were or are still excluded from (more recently the question also arose for homosexual persons). Regarding texts and considerations of the very conception of the divine and the sacred, the spectrum is equally broad. It may include highlighting the women that had been made invisible in sacred books and in the tradition, of extracting the fundamental texts from their patriarchal and homophobic interpretations, but also of promoting a feminine conception of the divine and of the divine word (for example, “the Goddess” of certain Christian feminists). According to their strategies and interests, these feminists with a religious commitment have therefore proposed alternative practices and rituals, but they have also created associations or academic journals. Through their actions, these feminists have sometimes invested themselves in the most liberal sections of existing institutions, sometimes they have worked at their margins, or they have broken with their official structure while still claiming a particular tradition. The desire to ally with others also led them to become involved in ecumenism or interfaith projects. Others yet have developed a commitment to new forms of spirituality, which are felt to be less fixed and better able to reconcile with their feminism.

Living with their century, these feminists with a religious or spiritual commitment have also had to position themselves in relation to feminist issues regarding civil society (divorce, abortion, sexuality, homosexuality, etc.) and often have had to distance themselves from the official positions of their religious authorities. In the present context, these feminists’ views on the positions and strategies of the fundamentalist wings of their tradition are of great interest.

Finally, when we examine their feminist commitment, we must consider the nature of the arguments underlying their criticisms and claims. Given the importance within the various religious traditions of a system based on a highly hierarchic “complementarity” between men and women, we can wonder how these feminists relate to differentialist conceptions, which assume an essential difference between the masculine and the feminine, accompanied by a strong revaluation of the later. Is this the mainstream or have other feminist postures also been favored in some cases?

By launching a call for scientific contributions devoted to “religious feminisms and feminist spiritualities,” NQF wishes to receive proposals analyzing the forms and stakes of a feminist commitment within the three monotheistic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as well as within new religious movements.

Considering the public of NQF, it is necessary that these contributions contextualize the stakes specific to the religious / spiritual tradition while analyzing the feminist stakes, not only as they are developed internally but also with regard to the positions feminists developed outside religious or spiritual frameworks. In this respect, it seems important to us to put into perspective the geographical diversity of these feminisms which have religious / spiritual roots. Indeed, the relations between feminism and Protestantism or between feminism and Judaism do not, for example, function in the same ways in Europe and the United States, a fact which undoubtedly owes as much to the different forms taken by feminist mobilizations as to the diversity of religious orientations in these two socio-geographical areas (in the USA, for example, conservative Protestant churches are more numerous and liberal Judaism is much more present than in Europe). There is also a particular geography of new feminist religious movements (for example, the political orientations or inspirations of certain neo-pagan movements, sometimes reactionary, sometimes progressive, may be opposed in the USA compared to Europe or in cities compared to the countryside). This also signifies that there is a circulation and acclimatization of religious feminisms and feminist spiritualities, as exemplified by the case of Muslim feminisms. In this context, analysis that adopt a comparative perspective either between geographical areas or between religious traditions seem likely to provide stimulating insights.

NQF organizes a colloquium on the theme “Religious feminisms and feminist spiritualities”, which will take place at the University of Lausanne on the 28th of November 2017 and will continue with the publication, at the beginning of 2019, of issue 38/1 of NQF devoted to this same topic. The present call therefore applies to both the colloquium and the issue 38/1 of NQF. We strongly encourage communications with an article proposal, however it is also possible to propose only a communication or an article.

The languages of the colloquium are French and English. The articles in issue 38/1 of NQF will be published in French. However, it is possible to carry out the evaluation and correction of the articles for texts written in English, German or even Italian. In this case, however, the translation and funding for the translation must be done by the author of the article.

Please send your proposals for communication and / or article (1-2 pages) by e-mail to Amel Mahfoud (amel.mahfoudh@hevs.ch) as a word document by 3 April 2017. The evaluation of the proposals will take place in April and a response will be given in early May 2017.

The acceptance of a proposed communication and / or article does not mean that the article will be accepted in the end. Indeed, each text is entrusted for evaluation to two reviewers. On this basis, it may be “accepted as is,” “accepted on condition of modifications” or “rejected”.

Book Announcement: Cristina Rocha

John of God: The Globalization of Brazilian Faith Healing  (OUP2017)  Cristina Rocha

This is the first ethnographic account of the global spiritual movement headed the Brazilian faith healer John of God, who has become an international faith healing superstar in the past decade. Renowned for performing surgeries using kitchen knives and scissors, without anesthetics or asepsis, John of God is visited by thousands of the desperately ill, the wealthy, celebrities such as Oprah Winfrey, Ram Daas, and Shirley MacLaine, and an increasing array of media. Drawing on a decade of fieldwork in Brazil, the US, the UK, Germany, Australia, and New Zealand, Cristina Rocha examines the social and cultural forces that have made it possible for a healer from Brazil to become a global “guru” in the 21st century. The book’s key themes are: the ways in which religion is both globalized and localized in late modernity, the establishment of transnational communities of belief, the transformation of poor rural areas into sites of globalization, the efficacy of healing across cultures, and the prominent place of healing (of the body, the spirit and the planet) and its intimate connection with spirituality and religion in late modernity.

 

“This is one of the most insightful and engaging accounts of spiritual healing in recent years. By focusing on one of the most intriguing spiritual healers of our time, Joao de Deus, Rocha illuminates the enduring relevance, despite significant secularization in the West, of curing through faith. This book belongs on the top shelf of everyone interested in 21st-century religion, spirituality and globalization.”

R. Andrew Chesnut, author of Devoted to Death: Santa Muerte, the Skeleton Saint.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Ch 1: Meeting John of God: an Uneasy Beginning

Ch 2: How does He Get His Magic?

Ch 3: Re-enchanting Healing

Ch 4: Abadiania as a Touristic Borderzone

Ch 5: Spiritual Tourism, Cultural Translation, and Friction

Ch 6: Flows into the Global North: Building a Transnational Spiritual Community

Ch 7: Localizing Flows: Healing the Land of its Suffering

Conclusion

Notes

References

Index

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/john-of-god-9780190466718?q=rocha&lang=en&cc=us#

 

A two-day conference at the University of York: Fresh Perspectives on Pilgrimage and Place

‘Fresh Perspectives on Pilgrimage and Place’

A two-day conference at the University of York July 18-19, 2017 

Background In autumn 2017 an interdisciplinary team (History, Social Anthropology, Religious Studies, Theology, Archaeology, Art History and 3D visualisation) from the University of York, Open University and University of Toronto will complete a 3 year Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project on ‘Pilgrimage and England’s Cathedrals, Past and Present’. The project focuses on cathedrals as unique ‘laboratories’ in which to examine wider questions about the meanings and experience of pilgrimage and sacred space through the centuries.

 

Conference This conference is designed as an opportunity to share project research outcomes in conversation with others working in the fields of pilgrimage and both journey- and place-related spirituality. We therefore invite proposals from individuals (20 minute papers) or groups/networks (90 minute sessions). Proposals (up to 250 words) should be sent to Dr Dee Dyas (dee.dyas@york.ac.uk) by March 1, 2017. Those invited to present papers will be notified by March 21.

 

Seminar at University of Agder, Kristiansand

The Repstad Seminar: Studying Religion in Contemporary Society

This open seminar takes the scholarly work of our colleague professor Pål Repstad as its point of departure. As he is about to retire from his ordinary position at the University of Agder, we give him and ourselves this opportunity to discuss some of his main scholarly interests and perspectives. The seminar concentrates on a further clarification of the social science contribution to the understanding of religiousness in late modern societies. The symposium will also discuss the relevance of social science studies of religion for other scholarly disciplines.

Pål Repstad is professor in sociology of religion at University of Agder, Norway. He has written extensively on changes in contemporary religion, especially about religion in the Nordic countries. Books by him have been translated into Swedish, Danish, English, Bosnian, Turkish and Persian. He has been editor of Nordic Journal of Religion and Society for many years. His most well-known book in English is An Introduction to the Sociology of Religion (2006, co-authored with Inger Furseth). He is an honorary doctor at Uppsala University.

Program

Tuesday May 23, 2017

1015 Welcome

1025: Pål Repstad, University of Agder: Sociology of religion in contexts

1045: Jim Beckford, University of Warwick: Religious diversity: Sociological issues and perspectives

1130: Lunch

1215: Mia Lövheim, Uppsala University: Mediatization and religion: reflections on the usefulness of a difficult word

1245: Inger Furseth, University of Oslo: Religious complexity. Using complexity theory to understand multiple trends

1315: Anne Løvland, University of Agder: Social semiotics in the study of religion

1335: Break

1350: Ida Marie Høeg, University of Agder: Lived religion – a tool in theorizing varieties of religion, spirituality and non-religion? The case of new death rituals

1415: Jan-Olav Henriksen, MF Norwegian School of Theology/University of Agder and Paul Leer-Salvesen, University of Agder: Empirically informed theology

1500: Coffee Break

1530: Former Master and PhD candidates supervised by Pål Repstad present their work (10 minutes each):

Nils Justvik: Sports among Conservative Christians – from sin to a gift from God

Irene Trysnes: Camping with God. Roles and rituals at Christian summer festivals for young people

Tomas Rasmussen: Street Religion – Faith among Romanian beggars in Kristiansand

Kristina Grundetjern: The trek and the target. A pilgrimage in Norway

Bjarte Leer-Helgesen: Preaching to Mourners

Tale Steen-Johnsen: Is anyone listening? Religious leaders building peace in times of violent conflict

1645: Pål Repstad: Summing Up

1700: End of seminar

1900: Dinner

Exhibition

Pål Repstad has for many years been an eager collector of small commercial religious objects. After the seminar, an exhibition based on his collection will open in the university library, with a brief reflection from Pål about what such objects can tell us about contemporary religious trends. After that, there will be mingling and a dinner.

Practicalities

Venue

University of Agder, Campus Kristiansand

http://www.uia.no/en/about-uia/campus-kristiansand

Accommodation

The University of Agder has agreements with the following hotels

  • Thon Hotel Kristiansand
  • Scandic Dyreparken Kristiansand
  • Comfort Hotel, Kristiansand
  • Scandic Kristiansand Bystranda
  • Radisson Blue Caledonien Krs
  • Clarion Hotel Ernst

When booking be sure to mention that you will participate at a conference at the University of Agder to get a reduced price.

A low-cost alternative may be

  • Sjøgløtt Hotell Kristiansand

Registration

https://eras.uia.no/reg.php?id=1903

Please register before April 1, 2017

There is no conference fee and the dinner is complementary of the University of Agder.

Contact and further information:

Hans Hodne, Head of Department

Telephone: 38 14 20 66

Mobile: 416 75 581

hans.hodne@uia.no

 

 

Call for Papers: Social Science History Association Religion Network

Social Science History Association 2017 Annual Conference

Montreal, Quebec, November 2-5, 2017

Conference Theme: “Changing Social Connections in Time and Space”

The Religion Network of the Social Science History Association invites proposals for papers, panels, and book sessions for the 42st annual meeting of the Social Science History Association in Montreal, Quebec, November 2-5, 2017.  We also are looking for volunteers to serve as panel chairs and discussants.

The SSHA is the leading interdisciplinary association for historical research in the US, providing a stimulating venue for explorations of how social processes unfold over time. The Religion Network serves as the home within the organization for scholars interested in religious history, religious mobilization, religious change, and religion’s effect on social and political processes. Our network is interdisciplinary and cross-national in scope, and embraces all scholarship that examines how religion intersects with other social processes in historical perspective.

We encourage the participation of graduate students and recent PhDs as well as more established scholars from a wide range of disciplines and departments. Graduate students are eligible to apply for financial support to attend the annual meeting (seehttp://www.ssha.org/grants). Further details about the association, the 2017 annual meeting, and the call for proposals are available on the SSHA website:www.ssha.org.

The deadline for paper and/or panel submissions is March 3rd, 2017.

We welcome and encourage papers and panel proposals on a wide array of issues related to the historical study of religion and society. While complete panel proposals (consisting of 4-5 individual papers, a chair, and a discussant) are preferred, we also seek out high-quality individual paper submissions. Panels and papers may address the topics below, or any other relevant and related topic examining religion in a historical context:

  • Religion and Science
  • Religion, Morality, and Social Norms
  • Religion and Populist Politics
  • Religious Networks
  • Secular, Religious, and Sacred Spaces
  • Religion and Migration
  • Comparative Secularisms

Please use the SSHA’s web conference management system to submit your papers and panel proposals. Paper title, brief abstract, and contact information should be submitted at http://prod.sshaconference.org/people/login. Please do not hesitate to contact the Religion Network representatives with any questions, comments, or for help with submissions.

Thank you, and we look forward to a stimulating set of panels at this year’s SSHA meeting.

Ates Altinordu (atesaltinordu@sabanciuniv.edu)

Damon Mayrl (dmayrl@clio.uc3m.es)

Sam Nelson (scnelson0@gmail.com)

Philip Gorski (philip.gorski@yale.edu)

SSHA Religion Network Representatives

Call for Papers: American Academy of Religion Sociology of Religion Unit

The Sociology of Religion Unit of the American Academy of Religion serves as a bridge between religious studies and the subdiscipline of sociology of religion. It functions as a two-way conduit not only to import sociological research into religious studies but also to export the research of religious studies into both the subdiscipline and the broader field of sociology. Only through a cross-fertilization transgressing departmental boundaries can there be breakthroughs in research in both fields. The unit has a wide conception of sociology of religion. It is open to a multiplicity of paradigms and methodologies utilized in the subfield and sociology more broadly: theoretical as well as empirical, quantitative, qualitative, and comparative-historical. By liaising with other Program Units, the Sociology of Religion Unit is able to bring the rich diversity of critical and analytical perspectives that are housed in the American Academy of Religion into mainstream sociology of religion. Conversely, it aims to provide scholars of the study of religion with a deeper understanding of the landscape of sociology of religion.

Call for Papers: 

Sociology of Religion as part of a larger discipline is marked by a canonization of its theory and its division by paradigms and methodologies–whether these be the classics (Weber and Durkheim), the old paradigm (functionalism and social constructionism), or the new paradigm (rational choice) on the one hand or quantitative, qualitative, or historical-comparative sociology on the other. As it intersects with sociology of religion, the study of religion has drawn from theories and methodologies in conversation with sociology, anthropology, critical theory, psychology, history, and other related disciplines. We are interested both in papers that utilize the methods and theories in the study of religion and bring them into the sociological canon as well as those that help religious studies gain a better grasp of the sociological theory of religion. We encourage papers that exploit both the theory and methodology of sociology of religion and religious studies and use them as frames for analysis of concrete cases. We are interested in historical topics in the sociology of religion as well as contemporary ones. In particular, we request papers that touch upon social divisions examining race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, region, age, etc.

Critics of sociology of religion have pointed out that the field is dominated by North American scholars primarily interested in Protestantism. The discipline of religious studies provides a clear antidote to these perceived limitations. Therefore, we encourage contributions from academics who study the various religious traditions around the world as well as those studying North American religious communities. In particular, we would like submissions from scholars from all academic ranks across the lines of nationality, region, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, etc.

The purpose of the Sociology of Religion program unit of the American Academy of Religion is to bridge the gap and create cross-fertilization between the Sociology of Religion and Religious Studies. One way to do so is to break down each of these fields into their core component: theory, methods, and data. Comparing sociology of religion and religious studies: First, what are the core canons in each field? Sociological Theory of Religion (SOR) and Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (RS). What are their central theories? Second, what are the main methodologies that each field primarily relies upon? Finally, what count as data in each of these fields?

Along these lines, we are interested in the following topics:
• The intersection of theory, methods and data in Religious Studies and Sociology of Religion

• Bringing non-western theory into Sociological Theory of Religion and the Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

• Core Canons: Sociological Theory of Religion and Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

• Core Theories: Secularization Theory (or Religious Pluralism) and Critical Religion

• Comparative Methodologies: Sociology of Religion vs. Religious Studies

• What counts as data in Religious Studies and Sociology of Religion?

• Assessments of how “religion” is operationalized in quantitative sociology

Beyond this, we are particularly interested in the following more substantive topics. This is not an exclusive list and we encourage submissions on other topics as well.
• Peter Berger’s The Sacred Canopy at 50: Future Directions for a Sociological Classic

• Social and Religious Movements (along racial, ethnic, national, regional, or class lines)

• Sociology of Religion from Unheard Voices

In addition to this, the Sociology of Religion Unit is inviting proposal for a co-sponsored panel with the Anthropology of Religion Unit. Below is the description of the panel:
For a special panel co-sponsored with the Anthropology of Religion and Sociology of Religion program units, we invite papers that examine problems encountered or mistakes made in the context of ethnographic fieldwork. Papers should present the context of the research and the specific details of the problem/mistake that arose and how it was addressed. Extra time will be allotted to brainstorm additional solutions and to thinking broadly about a “methodology of/for mistakes.”

The Sociology of Religion Unit of AAR regularly co-sponsors panels with the peer-reviewed print and online journal Critical Research on Religion (CRR) (http://crr.sagepub.com). Published by SAGE Publications, the journal has over 8000 subscriptions worldwide. Presenters of promising papers in SOR panels will be invited to turn their papers into articles and submit them for peer review to CRR. For further information, please contact SOR co-chairs.

Method:
PAPERS
Process:
Proposals are anonymous to chairs and steering committee members during review, but visible to chairs prior to final acceptance or rejection
Leadership:

Chair

Steering Committee

https://papers.aarweb.org/content/sociology-religion-unit 

Call For Papers: AAR Religion and Migration

The Religion and Migration Unit seeks proposals for the 2017 American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting to be held in Boston, MA, related to these two themes: Gender, ritual, and religion in the experience of migration; and Loss, Gain, or Innovation? How do religious traditions change through migration?  Please submit 150 word abstracts along with 1000 word paper proposals through the AAR submission system.

 https://www.aarweb.org/annual-meeting

Assistant Professor at the Centre for Comparative Theology

The University of Lucerne is the youngest university in Switzerland. The roots of the Faculty of Theology extend back into the 16th century. On the foundation of the Judeo-Christian tradition, professors conduct research and lecture on individual theological disciplines in an interdisciplinary dis-course with other related academic fields. The faculty recognises that the local church and the world church are connected and sees ecumenical and interreligious dialogue as a top priority. In Switzerland, the faculty takes a leading role in training theologians.

The Faculty of Theology at the University of Lucerne (Switzerland) seeks to appoint an Assistant Professor at the Centre for Comparative Theology (50%) with immediate effect.

The assistant professor would represent the field of Islamic theology in re-search and teaching. The position is initially limited to 5 years. Candidates are expected to hold a doctoral degree and a project of a postdoctoral habilitation or an equivalent qualification. Good English skills are required.

In the interests of increasing the percentage of women in the University of Lucerne’s research and teaching activities, applications from women are expressly encouraged.

Please send applications with the usual documentation (in particular: CV, academic certificates, academic teaching activities, higher education didactics certificates, list of publications, research specialisations) both in printed form and on a CD to the University of Lucerne, Dean of the Faculty of Theology, Frohburgstrasse 3, Postfach 4466, CH-6002 Lucerne by 20.02.2017. Printed documents will not be returned; please do not send any original documents.