Ecclesiology and Ethnography Conference, Winnipeg, June 2018.

We are delighted to announce that Dr. Christopher Brittain, formerly of Aberdeen, and now Dean of Trinity College University of Toronto, will be keynote presenter at the inaugural Canadian Conference on Ecclesiology and Ethnography. We have had an excellent response to our first CFP as well as sustained interest in the conference. We are therefore sending out this second Call For Papers for the conference for those who might still be interested. Please pass it on to any students, scholars, and others who might want to participate and/or present.

Details for submission for papers and can be found here: http://www.ecclesiologyandethnography.com/event/ecclesiology-and-ethnography-canada/

For further information contact the organising group at eande2018@cmu.ca

Populist Politics & the Minority Voice: British Muslims, Extremisms & Inclusion

A one-day Muslims in Britain Research Network (MBRN) conference organised in partnership with the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College London (KCL), University of London

19 April 2018

Register at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/populist-politics-the-minority-voice-british-muslims-extremisms-inclusion-tickets-42902695116

Our hosts King’s College have generously provided financial support for the event which means we are able to keep the costs for registration down to £15 for general admission and £10 for PhD students and unwaged members (plus booking fee).

Themes include:

  • Muslim activism and populist politics;
  • New media, populism and the representation of Muslims and other minorities;
  • Recognising, opposing and offering alternatives to anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and other extremisms;
  • British Muslims and national identity after Brexit;
  • Challenges to, and for, principles of tolerance, free speech and accommodation.

Plenary speakers

Narzanin Massoumi, University of Exeter & editor, What is Islamophobia?
Aaron Winter, University of East London
David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism

More TBC…

Additional speakers

Reza Gholami, University of Birmingham
Khadijah Elshayyal, University of Edinburgh
Mirjam Aeschbach, University of Zurich
Shanon Shah, Critical Muslim
Ajmal Hussain, University of Manchester
Laura Jones, Cardiff University
Waqas Tufail, Leeds Beckett University
Gillian Kennedy, King’s College London
Kristin Henrard, ESL, Rotterdam
Ayesha Chowdhury, Leeds Becket University
Laurens de Rooij, University of Cape Town

Conference outline

Across Europe and North America populist parties and leaders have surged in recent years, with figures such as Donald Trump and Andrej Babiš and parties such as UKIP and Alternative für Deutschland making significant electoral gains. Although different in important respects, these movements share certain themes, such as emphasis on national self-interest and hostility toward international co-operation, liberal political norms and established news media. In almost all cases this desire to reassert national identity has also involved renewed hostility toward ethnic and religious minorities – especially Jewish and Muslim minorities – as well as toward any frameworks of liberal accommodation that have allowed minorities to participate in public life on an equal footing. In the UK, this was evident in the referendum on European Union membership in 2016, which not only destabilised previously taken-for-granted political and legal frameworks but also contributed to a sustained rise in hate crime, anti-immigration rhetoric and Islamophobia.

This one-day conference on ‘Populist politics and the minority voice’ will discuss the effects of these changes on British Muslims, and how the concerns of British Muslims relate to those of other minority groups as well as wider debates about the future of liberal states, free speech and ‘fake news’. Since at least the 1970s, British Muslims – as a group and alongside other minorities – have been involved in a struggle for rights, for media and political representation and for recognition. What might these struggles look like in the future? What is the future of British Muslim identity, post-Brexit? How might rights and legal accommodations be affected by withdrawal from the EU? How do concerns about rising Islamophobia intersect with concerns about resurgent anti-Semitism and far-right and populist movements? How should debates about Muslims and the media proceed in an era of ‘fake news’? How can standards of debate about minorities be preserved and what can higher education and Muslim institutions contribute?

Conference: APAD conference : Migration, Development and Citizenship

Panel conveyors: Hicham JAMID, PhD Candidate, LISE-CNRS Cnam-Paris & ORMES, University Ibn Zohr, Agadir, hichamjmd@gmail.com

Nina SAHRAOUI, Post-doctoral Research Associate, European University Institute, Florence, nina.sahraoui@gmail.com

Research on transnational spaces in the field of migration studies, notably since the 1990s, dedicated specific attention to the transnational practices of migrants, which remedied the biased perspective of the migrant considered only through the prism of immigration and not emigration. While issues revolving around ‘assimilation’, ‘multiculturalism’ and ‘integration’ of migrants have constituted until the end of the 1980s the bulk of social science research around migration, transnationalism studies offered a new analytical approach, able to account for migrants’ ability to create and maintain economic, political and socio-cultural ties between societies of residence and origin. This transnational frame has brought about new perspectives on return migration, revealing that the concept of ‘return’ far from equating definitive return, could be conceptualised as a stage, a phase of the migratory trajectory that needs to be studied in all its dimensions across time and space (Petit et al., 2007). Conceptualising the migrant as a ‘transmigrant’ (Glick Schiller et. al., 1995) sheds light on other dynamics engendered by migration, notably social (Levitt, 1998) and political remittances (Ostergaard-Nielsen, 2003; Collyer, 2014). The study of transnational practices of migrants equally led to an increased scholarly interest for the implications of migration for non-migrant individuals and communities (Levitt and Lamba-Nieves, 2013).

Overall, the development of research in this field has, however, rarely relied on intersectional analytical frames. Several theoretical propositions appear nevertheless to be relevant to intersectional analyses of power relations within transnational practices, such as Floya Anthias’ conceptualisation of ‘translocational positionality’ (Anthias, 2012) or Sarah Mahler and Patricia Pessar’s work on ‘gendered geographies of power’ (Mahler and Pessar, 2001). This panel wishes to dedicate specific attention to gendered and classed analyses of transnational citizenship practices, social remittances, and circular/return migration.

This call invites papers, in French or English, which consider (notably but not only) the following topics:

· circular/return migration, and notably intersectional analyses of these migration patterns;

· forms of social remittances, case studies and typologies ;

· impacts of new technologies on social and political remittances ;

· social remittances of migrants and development issues ;

· social remittances as multidirectional phenomenon between society of departure and society of residence ;

· transnational citizenship practices and their social, civic and political implications for societies of origin ;

· circular/return migration in the light of issues around nationality, citizenship and dual citizenship;

· the implications of emigration and circular/return migration on non-migrant individuals/ families/ communities.

All social sciences disciplines are relevant to this call and interdisciplinary approaches are of particular interest.

Proposals, of 500 words maximum, should be sent by December, 10th, 2017 to Hicham Jamid (hichamjmd@gmail.com) and Nina Sahraoui (nina.sahraoui@gmail.com) and indicate name of author, current position and affiliation. Proposals should specify the main research question, the theoretical framework as well as the methodology followed for the collection of the data mobilised in the paper.

Full communication papers need to be submitted by April 1st, 2018.

Practical information (to be found on the conference website):

This panel is organised in the framework of the APAD (the Association for the Anthropology of Social Change and Development) 2018 conference ‘Migration, Development and Citizenship’ to be held in Roskilde, Denmark, 23-25 Mai 2018.

The Conference languages are English and French.

Registration: Full rate for standard registration: €160. The standard registration fee includes documentation, lunch, coffee-breaks, cocktail and APAD fees for 2018 (+ including one issue of Anthropology & development, APAD journal).

Concession rate (APAD members): €120.

Some grants will be available for African scholars. APAD will organise a writing workshop in March 2018 for young African scholars with a selected paper.

For more information: http://apad-association.org/en/2018-conference/

Repostings from the AASR: Calls for Papers, Book Announcements, and Job Openings.

Here are the latest event, book, and job announcements from the newsletter of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Click the links or visit https://www.aasr.org.au/january-2018/ for information.

Call for Papers

Islamic Ethics and the Trusteeship Paradigm: Interdisciplinary Explorations

Religious Marriages in the Mediterranean Conference 20-21st March 2018

Religion Area for the 9th Annual International Conference of the Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand July 2-4, 2018

Disputing Religion and Politics Research: How Western/Eurocentric is its Agenda? Hamburg 24-26 August 2018

Populist politics and the minority voice: British Muslims, extremisms and inclusion 19 April 2018

Multiple Religious Identities – Individuals, Communities, Traditions
16th Annual Conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR) / IAHR Regional Conference, Bern 2018

Religions and Identities in the European Migration Crisis – Abstract deadline: January, 31

Post-global Religion, EASR conference 17-21 June in Bern

Academic Publications

Siddiqi, Bulbul (2018) Becoming ‘Good Muslim’: The Tablighi Jamaat in the UK and Bangladesh, Springer

Chakrabarti, Anindita (2018) Faith and Social Movements: Religious Reform in Contemporary India, published by Cambridge University Press

Knut A. Jacobsen (2018) Yoga in Modern Hinduism: Hariharānanda Āraṇya and Sāṃkhyayoga, Routeldge

Foroutan, Y. (2017), Muslim Minority of New Zealand in Global Context: Demographic Perspective, Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, 37 (4): 511-519.

Račius, Egdūnas (2018) Muslims in Eastern Europe, Edinburgh University Press

Academic Positions

Four Ph.D. research fellowships available at MF-Norwegian    School of Theology

Two vacancies as postdoc at MF-Norwegian School of Theology, with effect from 1st of September 2018

(Thanks to Dr Milad Milani)

Call for Papers for the Panel On Religion and Politics: Post- and Decolonial Interventions

ECPR General Conference, Hamburg 24-26 August 2018

Section: Revisiting Religion and Politics Research: Achievements, Critique, Future Questions

Panel Chair: Zubair Ahmad, BGSMCS, Freie Universität Berlin (zubair@zedat.fuberlin.de)

Discussant: N.N.
Deadline: 4th February, 2018 Panel Description

Postcolonial and Decolonial analyses have developed an extensive and valuable body of scholarship. In doing so, they have problematized and critiqued the Eurocentric formation of colonial modernity, along with its forms of epistemic and sociopolitical violence, its contradictions, and contingencies. Furthermore, they have altered analytical avenues in order to critically reevaluate the persistence of Eurocentric hegemonies (normative assumptions, epistemological structures, and power effects) accompanying and underpinning our present. Whereas these scholars have significantly shaped disciplines such as history, comparative literature, anthropology, or the study of religion, it is remarkable how their contributions remain marginal, if not absent, within the study of politics.

Against this backdrop, this panel seeks to provide a forum for critically engaging with postcolonial and decolonial scholarship. It does this by specifically turning toward the, by now, famous dyad of religion and politics. Departing from the premises that European colonization has been a “major, extended and ruptural world-historical event” (Stuart Hall), postcolonial and decolonial interrogations have long suggested convoluted histories of religion and politics. The epistemic, conceptual, and effective formation and history of religion and politics, as a dyad, these scholars suggest, has taken place in close proximity with Europe’s colonial endeavors – their reverberation and duress haunting our very present. From knowing and governing the colonized and (post-)colonial Other to ordering the colony, religion and politics have a longer history and much more complex presence than the liberal paradigm of investigation usually suggests, or forces upon our very inquiries. Engaging with the relationship of religion and politics since the 1970s and 1980s, subfields such as comparative politics or political theory have neglected these and other postcolonial/decolonial insights while keeping colonial epistemologies, divisions, questions, and orders in tact.

In order to address this troubling state-of-affairs within the study of politics, the panel invites contributions from decisively postcolonial or/and decolonial perspectives. The overall aim is twofold: Firstly, to evaluate and problematize the hegemonic, and therefore persistent, analytical avenues taken within a more mainstream engagement with religion and politics and, secondly, to broaden the scope of engagement, depth, and analysis by introducing postcolonial/decolonial questions, epistemologies, modes of investigation, and problematizations to an important and still ongoing debate.

Please submit your abstract (350-500 words) to Zubair Ahmad (zubair@zedat.fu-berlin.de) no later than 4th February.

Zubair Ahmad

Doctoral Fellow

Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies

Freie Universität Berlin

Altensteinstraße 48 | 14195 Berlin

Call for Papers: panel on “ Being religious, being scientific: the dynamics of science and religion in the laboratory ”

(Submitted by Joseph Satish, from the University of Hyderabad, India.)

I write to invite paper abstracts from members of the ISA Sociology of Religion Network, to our open panel, “ Being religious, being scientific: the dynamics of science and religion in the laboratory ” (Panel #30), at this year’s Annual Meeting of the  Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) in Sydney, 29 August – 1 September 2018.

In keeping with the theme of the conference “TRANSnational STS”, we invite contributions from scholars all over the world, who have explored questions related to the panel, from the perspectives of Science, Technology & Society Studies (STS), Religious Studies, Sociology and Anthropology of Religion, History of Science and related disciplines, across local, national and transnational units of analysis.

Abstract submissions (upto 250 words) to our panel can be made at the conference website via:  https://4s2018sydney.org/call-for-papers-open-panels/ . The abstract should contain the paper’s main arguments, methods, and contributions to STS and related disciplines. The deadline is February 1, 2018.

Religious Marriages in the Mediterranean

Religious Marriages in the Mediterranean

Venue and date: Mediterranean Institute, University of Malta, 20-21 March 2018

Within Mediterranean settings, religious marriage has functioned for centuries, together with conversion, as a means both of formal social incorporation and of exclusion of outsiders in relation to religiously-defined officially-recognised ethnic communities. Such an approach was an integral part of the Ottoman constitution; aspects of the millet system continue to have some posthumous existence in states like Lebanon and Cyprus. Over the last century or so, the development of secular or ‘quasi-secular’ nation-states throughout the region has generally meant the replacement of religious by civil marriage within state legal systems. Whether this has occurred via silent absorption or principled exclusion of religious unions, or even by the creation of dualist systems giving civil marriage pride of place, the juridical implications have been profound and range from the complete legal marginalisation of previously dominant religious traditions to the creation of ‘protected zones’ within secular jurisdictions within which religious law can operate. Everywhere religious courts have been side-lined and have either been completely eliminated from the formal state’s radar, or compelled to accept a subordinate position within the state judicial hierarchy. At the same time, formally secular forms of marriage with religious conceptual roots have had to serve as important gate-keepers in granting or withholding access to citizenship and legal residence in states like Greece, Malta or Spain, which have been at the forefront of Mediterranean migrant flows.

More recently unregistered religious marriages have gone through a revival, proving also to be a useful vehicle for addressing mismatches between state legislation and the matrimonial strategies of couples. Thus the Mediterranean, a point of both intersection and mixing where ideas about the ‘West’ and its ‘other’, are re-produced and transformed, has witnessed how these transitions resulted in either a tense relationship between marriages regulated by formal, state laws and religious marriages celebrated according to informal, religious norms, or on the other end of the spectrum, civil marriages and (certain) religious marriages living harmoniously side-by-side and at times also being considered synonymous.

This multidisciplinary conference seeks to bring together researchers who have engaged in research on religious marriages in the Mediterranean. Papers may focus on, but are not limited to, one or more of the following themes:

  1. Exploring the legal and social interaction between religious and civil marriages in the Mediterranean, whether contemporary or historical perspective (colonial and postcolonial).
  2. Investigating the non-apparent connections between different religions within and without marriage legislation (Sunni, Shia, Catholic, Orthodox, Coptic, Jewish, Hindu…), including papers on mixed marriages.
  3. How human/civil rights discourses blend and/or conflict with other forms of theological, moral and/or customary discourses on religious marriages.
  4. Diverse ways of concluding and/or celebrating religious marriages in the Mediterranean.

5. Problematization and politicization of religious marriages in the Mediterranean.

Organizers:

Ibtisam Sadegh (University of Amsterdam) David Zammit (University of Malta)
Susan Hirsch (George Mason University)

Papers (7,000-8,000 words), will be considered for publication in a special issue of the international, peer-reviewed Journal of Mediterranean Studies (ISSN: 1016-3476), published by the Mediterranean Institute, University of Malta and available electronically through Project Muse.

Upon request, limited travel and accommodation funds (two nights) may be available for short-listed candidates who cannot apply for funding from their own universities. Please submit your request for funding with your paper proposal.

Key note speaker:
Annelies Moors, Professor of Anthropology, University of Amsterdam

Deadline for abstract submission: 31 January 2018

Abstracts of 200-300 words are to be submitted via e-mail: i.sadegh@uva.nl with ‘abstract’ and your last name in the subject heading.

Timeline:
31 January 2018: Deadline for abstract submission
10 February 2018: Notification of acceptance
1 March 2018: Deadline for complete draft of paper between 5000 – 8000 words
or a PowerPoint presentation.
20-21 March 2018: Conference hosted by the Mediterranean Institute
1 April 2018: Select participants will be invited to submit papers for consideration for publication in 2018 in the Journal of Mediterranean Studies

This two-day conference is organized by the University of Malta through the Department of Civil Law and the Mediterranean Institute research group on Belief, Identity and Exchange in conjunction with the ERC-funded research project on ‘Problematizing “Muslim Marriages”: Ambiguities and Contestations’ hosted by the University of Amsterdam.

 

CFP:Conference of the International Research Training Group June 21-22 Rome 2018

Call for papers: Conference of the International Research Training Group “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Religion and Transnational Religious Discourses: Globality Construction and Resistance

Rome, June 21-22, 2018

Venue: German Historical Institute Rome, Via Aurelia Antica, 391

The International Research Training Group (IRTG) “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe” is based at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Charles University in Prague and Masaryk University in Brno. Cooperation partners are the Collegium Carolinum in Munich and the German Historical Institute in Rome.

The IRTG aims to contribute in a fundamental, both theoretically and methodologically innovative way to the analysis of the relationship between religion and modernity in Europe. Its research projects are interdisciplinary and international. Through joint methodology seminars and summer schools, it offers a study program that is carried out in Czech-German-Polish cooperation.

The conference deals with the ambivalent relationship between religion and globalization. The geographical distribution of religious communities has been used time and again to define supposedly immovable boundaries of civilization. Particular identities, such as local or national affiliations, are often backed by religious arguments and practices. At the same time, religion is one of the most important driving forces of transnational integration. Religion often claims universal validity and cross-border relationships are rather the rule than the exemption for religious communities. A religion contained within the boundaries of a single national state is an exception.

The conference poses the question of how religions and religious thinkers have responded to phenomena of globalization since the 19th century and how they have themselves been involved in the construction of transnational and global self-understanding. It focuses equally on the analysis of deliberate defense against cross-border influences, justified by a territorialized claim to validity of a particular “native” religious community, on the analysis of the area of tension between particularity and universality and the analysis of globalization strategies of religion, in confessional as well as in ecumenical contexts.

Organizers:

Martin Baumeister, Director of the German Historical Institute in Rome

Martin Schulze Wessel, Speaker of the IRTG “Religious cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Martina Niedhammer, Historical Seminar of LMU Munich

CFP:Conference of the International Research Training Group June 21-22 Rome 2018

Call for papers: Conference of the International Research Training Group “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Religion and Transnational Religious Discourses: Globality Construction and Resistance

Rome, June 21-22, 2018

Venue: German Historical Institute Rome, Via Aurelia Antica, 391

The International Research Training Group (IRTG) “Religious Cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe” is based at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Charles University in Prague and Masaryk University in Brno. Cooperation partners are the Collegium Carolinum in Munich and the German Historical Institute in Rome.

The IRTG aims to contribute in a fundamental, both theoretically and methodologically innovative way to the analysis of the relationship between religion and modernity in Europe. Its research projects are interdisciplinary and international. Through joint methodology seminars and summer schools, it offers a study program that is carried out in Czech-German-Polish cooperation.

The conference deals with the ambivalent relationship between religion and globalization. The geographical distribution of religious communities has been used time and again to define supposedly immovable boundaries of civilization. Particular identities, such as local or national affiliations, are often backed by religious arguments and practices. At the same time, religion is one of the most important driving forces of transnational integration. Religion often claims universal validity and cross-border relationships are rather the rule than the exemption for religious communities. A religion contained within the boundaries of a single national state is an exception.

The conference poses the question of how religions and religious thinkers have responded to phenomena of globalization since the 19th century and how they have themselves been involved in the construction of transnational and global self-understanding. It focuses equally on the analysis of deliberate defense against cross-border influences, justified by a territorialized claim to validity of a particular “native” religious community, on the analysis of the area of tension between particularity and universality and the analysis of globalization strategies of religion, in confessional as well as in ecumenical contexts.

Organizers:

Martin Baumeister, Director of the German Historical Institute in Rome

Martin Schulze Wessel, Speaker of the IRTG “Religious cultures in 19th and 20th-Century Europe”

Martina Niedhammer, Historical Seminar of LMU Munich

CFP: Joint Conference in Belfast, Sept 2018

Call for Papers

Joint Conference between the British Association for the Study of Religions and the Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions

3–5 September 2018, Queen’s University, Belfast

Held in Association with the Religious Studies Research Forum at the Institute of Theology and the School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics.

 Keynote Speakers:
Gladys Ganiel (Queen’s University, Belfast)
Naomi Goldenberg (University of Ottawa)

 Borders and boundaries define limits and margins, centres and peripheries. They demarcate territories, and separate entities and bodies and, as such, they function to guard space, limit action and exclude. They are, however, also contact zones and places of exchange, the ‘limen’ or threshold, the in-between, and the places of temptation and transgression. In the current political context when Ireland and the UK are faced with the dilemmas, paradoxes and implications of Brexit, this special joint conference of the Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions (ISASR) and the British Association for the Study of Religions (BASR) invites paper, research slam, panel and roundtable proposals on the theme of Borders and Boundaries. Scholars based outside the Republic of Ireland or the UK are invited to submit proposals related to this theme regardless of whether their work relates to these islands. Scholars who are based in the UK or the Republic of Ireland and are working on religion and related categories are welcome to submit proposals on any topic whether or not it relates to the conference theme.

Borders and boundaries of states, religions and identities have played a defining role in relations between Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, and Great Britain, perhaps most significantly the boundaries between religious communities. The negotiation between different religious lifeworlds, worldviews, constructs and dogmas takes place across perceived borders, whether real or imagined. Of concern amongst these for scholars of religions are the distinctions drawn between ‘religion’ and related categories, and between the ‘insider’ and ‘outsider’, which require the scholar to engage with the complexity of symbolic divides associated with identity, belief and belonging. In anthropological studies of religions, the crossing of borders or the ‘limen’ constitutes a transformational experience. Participation in ritual, pilgrimage and ecstatic practices often requires the crossing of thresholds between different states, between human and divine, human and animal, between different realms, of the living and the dead, material and spirit or otherworlds. Things that are normally kept separate, physically, conceptually and symbolically, meet at crossing points in the landscape, in ritual and in spiritual journeys.

These topics and more will provide the substantive content for this first-ever joint conference between these two member associations of the International Association for the History of Religions (IAHR).

Please note that papers should contribute to the aims of both societies, ISASR and BASR, specifically to advance research and education through the academic study of religions by providing a forum for the critical, analytical and cross-cultural study of religions, past and present. The conference will not be a forum for confessional, apologetical, interfaith or other similar concerns.

Proposals to be submitted to isasrbasr2018@gmail.com by 27 April 2018 (please include name, title, affiliation, and email address).

Paper Proposals: please submit title and abstract of 200 words.

Research Slam: A research “slam” is a quick succession of presentations of max. 7 minutes per presenter that gives a lively impression of a project, a programme, a network, or a collaboration the presenter is participating in. Please submit research slam proposals in the form of a title and brief (max. 150 words) abstract. It is possible to submit a research slam proposal as well as a paper proposal.

Panel proposals: please submit abstracts of 200 words for panel proposals. All panel proposals should include the name, title, affiliation, and email address of each presenter plus the chair and discussant (if applicable) plus abstracts for each of the papers on the panel.

Confirmation of acceptance on the conference programme will be sent by 15 June 2018. A small number of bursaries for postgraduate students and ECRs will be available.

See https://basr.ac.uk/ and/or https://isasr.wordpress.com/ for more information and updates.