New Book: “Kinship, Law and Politics: An Anatomy of Belonging”

Kinship, Law and Politics

By Joseph E. David

Book description

Why are we so concerned with belonging? In what ways does our belonging constitute our identity? Is belonging a universal concept or a culturally dependent value? How does belonging situate and motivate us? Joseph E. David grapples with these questions through a genealogical analysis of ideas and concepts of belonging. His book transports readers to crucial historical moments in which perceptions of belonging have been formed, transformed, or dismantled. The cases presented here focus on the pivotal role played by belonging in kinship, law, and political order, stretching across cultural and religious contexts from eleventh-century Mediterranean religious legal debates to twentieth-century statist liberalism in Western societies. With his thorough inquiry into diverse discourses of belonging, David pushes past the politics of belonging and forces us to acknowledge just how wide-ranging and fluid notions of belonging can be.

Reviews

‘Not since Charles Taylor have scholars seen such a profound inquiry into the sources of selfhood and the nature of belonging in community. Joseph David draws on a stunning range of ancient and modern, familiar and forgotten figures to probe the depths of human nature and our essential bonds of marriage and family, friendship and faith, property and state. This is interdisciplinary and interreligious scholarship of the highest caliber.’
—– John Witte, Jr. – Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion, Emory University

‘Joseph David’s book is an immensely erudite and deep exploration of the meaning of belonging and identity. David’s brilliant examination of the belonging and identity in their different layers and in diverse historical settings, is of fundamental importance to the understanding of the complexity of the concept and the vital role it plays in contemporary political and cultural life.’
—- Moshe Halbertal – New York University

Call for Articles for a Thematic Issue of Religion

Working titles (comments/suggestions welcome):

Emic Categories and New Paths / Case Studies in the Scholarly Use of Indigenous Concepts

Religion invites contributions for a thematic issue consisting of case studies of concepts from non-prominent cultures (not just religions) that have been or could be useful in the study of religion/s. Is there a blindspot, lacuna or distortion in the study of religion/s that can be highlighted or addressed by a term from a tradition that you study? Does a particular concept from your materials/data/fieldwork move past our existing vocabulary or contribute to current debates? Is our discipline missing key terms for specific areas of research – material culture, views of selfhood, non-binary categories, dynamic and non-essentialist views of pluralisms etc. – and where might these be found? On the negative side, have classic appropriations of certain insider concepts created more problems than they are worth (god, guru, hell, liturgy, mana, shaman)? Within the academy, are there terms used in non-English language scholarship, beyond the North-Atlantic axis (or even within, e.g., evangelical Christianity and other well-studied traditions), that can contribute to our discipline (e.g., emerging emic concepts, indigenous methods or southern theory)? Each article will discuss a single concept (or two or three closely related terms), spelling out the significance of the term in its home context, contribution to the study of religions, and a critical assessment of existing uses (if any) in the relevant scholarly literatures. Final length: 5000–10000 words, all-inclusive.

Please send a brief proposal or outline (500–1200 words) by February 1, 2021. Proposed submission deadline: Sept 1, 2021. Web copy of this call: https://stevenengler.ca/cfp/ Questions and comments: sengler@mtroyal.ca

Call for Papers: Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Call for Papers: 45th Annual Conference of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion (AASR)

The Australian Association for the Study of Religion (AASR) has been fostering the development of high quality scholarship on religion since its establishment in 1975, seeking to create a strong sense of community and mutual opportunity for established and emerging voices across Australia and the wider Asia-Pacific region.

In this current time of crisis, in which community is at a premium, the AASR will meet online for our 45th annual conference, joined by our colleagues from the New Zealand Association for the Study of Religions. Current and prospective AASR and NZASR members are warmly encouraged to apply to present their ongoing research in any field of the study of religion. Meeting in Zoom webinars on 11-12 December 2020, the conference program will highlight the strength and diversity of the study of religion, in Australia and New Zealand especially, expanding networks of scholarship and support.

In this current time of crisis, in which community is at a premium, the AASR will meet online for our 45th annual conference, joined by our colleagues from the New Zealand Association for the Study of Religions. Current and prospective AASR and NZASR members are warmly encouraged to apply to present their ongoing research in any field of the study of religion. Meeting in Zoom webinars on 11-12 December 2020, the conference program will highlight the strength and diversity of the study of religion, in Australia and New Zealand especially, expanding networks of scholarship and support.

We particularly welcome PhD students and will be hosting specific events targeted towards creating connections across disciplines and universities during the conference for Higher Degree Researchers and early career academics.

We welcome both individual papers as well as panel submissions relevant to religion. Proposals can be submitted in the traditional panel format as well as roundtable discussions, information sessions and interactive media. In addition, presentations which focus on methods and tools on teaching and learning in an online environment in higher education are encouraged.

Proposals of up to 300 words and additional questions may be sent to aasrconference2020@gmail.com until 31 October 2020, to be reviewed on an ongoing basis by members of the AASR executive. Please include relevant affiliation and contact information in a single Word Document or PDF. Panel proposals should be submitted as a single document with a short abstract for the panel as well as individual abstracts and author information. Panels may consist of 3 or 4 participants. Paper presentations should be no longer than 15 minutes.

All presenters will be required to be members of the AASR by 30 November 2020. NZASR members and PhD candidates at Australian and New Zealand universities are exempt from this requirement.

Membership details are available on the AASR website via this link.

Specific technical information and timings will follow closer to the conference date and will be updated on our conference webpage.

Grant program: Integrating Social Science within African Theology

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The Nagel Institute, with generous support from the Templeton Religion Trust, invites project proposals for “Engaging African Realities: Integrating Social Science within African Theology.” Its aim is to support African theologians to engage in fresh social scientific integrated approaches with the goal of producing creative and original projects in grounded theology. We understand grounded theology as an attempt at realizing the potential of theological creativity from the bottom-up, as opposed to a top-down approach. The project seeks to emphasize how grounded theology is compatible with grounded theory in social sciences as a method for seeking hidden patterns and meanings through ethnography, a way to unearth stories and enable answers to questions from African realities. The 12 awards, of not more than $50,000 USD each, will enable grantees to participate in three intensive workshops on social science theory, methods and skills needed for grounded theology, and provide support for research on one of two topical areas:

  • African traditional values and spirituality with reference to religious experience
  • Religious innovation and competition focusing on African resources for innovation

Visit nagelinstitute.org for a comprehensive list of key questions and complete RFP instructions.
Proposals accepted in English, French, or Portuguese.

Applications by 15 September, 2020
Full Proposals (by invitation only) 1 December, 2020

Call for Papers: Journal of the Mormon Social Science Association

https://www.mormonsocialscience.org/2020/06/16/inaugural-issue-2021-journal-of-the-mormon-social-science-association-jmssa/

The Journal of the Mormon Social Science Association (JMSSA) is accepting submissions for our inaugural issue in 2021. Papers accepted for publication will receive a $500 honorarium. JMSSA is a peer-reviewed academic journal sponsored by the Mormon Social Science Association. Founded in 1979, the MSSA is an interdisciplinary scholarly society promoting the study of social life within the Latter Day Saint movement.
Aims and Scope
The Journal of the Mormon Social Science Association publishes original research, synthetic reviews, and theoretical or methodological essays on topics relevant to the Latter Day Saint movement from a social science perspective. We welcome papers from all social science disciplines, as well as work in other disciplines with a social science approach. We encourage submissions from students, junior scholars, and underrepresented voices in Mormon Studies. The journal is atheological and nonpolemical. The journal does not consider previously published work except by invitation. The journal does not consider papers simultaneously submitted elsewhere for review.
Submissions
Journal of the Mormon Social Science Association accepts papers of any length, including research notes. All submissions are screened by the editor or editorial board to determine their suitability for the journal. Papers deemed suitable are forwarded for peer-review. Subsequent to peer-review, papers may be rejected, returned for revision, or accepted for publication.
The journal conforms to the “author-date” citation system outlined in The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (Chapter 15). All submissions must be accompanied by an abstract not to exceed 250 words. Abstracts should state the research question(s), identify basic methods, and summarize main findings. Footnotes should be used for essential clarification only, and not for excurses.
Send submissions in MS Word format to: benjamin.knoll@centre.edu
For more information, contact Rick Phillips, rick.phillips@unf.edu

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Notes from the Australian Association for the Study of Religion June Newsletter

  Publications

Events:
Centre of Islamic Studies and Civilisation’s Islamic Studies Research Colloquium via Zoom, 26 June 2020 at 3pm-5pm. RSVP by 22 June 2020.

PhD/Job Opportunities:

Open position : PhD student in sociology of religion, diversity, and ethnicity

The Institute for the Social Sciences of Religions (ISSR) at the University of Lausanne is looking for a PhD student in sociology of religion, diversity, and ethnicity.
The selected person will work in a small motivated team on the creation and administration of the second wave of the National Congregation Study Switzerland (NCS II). This is a projet funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation on the diversity of local religious groups in Switzerland, across all religions, including both autochthonous and immigration groups. Collaborating partners are based at the University of Basel (CH), University of Strasbourg (F) and Duke University (USA).
Deadline for applications: June 30, 2020

Further details and submission of applications:
https://career5.successfactors.eu/career?career%5fns=job%5flisting&company=universitdP&navBarLevel=JOB%5fSEARCH&rcm%5fsite%5flocale=en%5fUS&career_job_req_id=15843&selected_lang=en_US&jobAlertController_jobAlertId=&jobAlertController_jobAlertName=&_s.crb=QWU6YYahmY1ko%2fLzVUCsAC6tEV4%3d

Only applications through the website will be taken into account. Thank you for your understanding

Call for Abstracts “Religious Fundamentalism: New challenges in Theory and Empirics across Religions and Cultures“

International and interdisciplinary workshop at Cluster of Excellence “Religion & Politics”, University of Munster, Germany

Date: October 16th – 17th, 2020

The project team “Religious Fundamentalism” at Cluster of Excellence “Religion & Politics”, chair of sociology of religion at University of Munster (Germany) organizes a workshop on “Religious Fundamentalism: New Challenges in Theory and Empirics across Religions and Cultures“.

The central aim of this workshop is to create a platform of interaction and dialogue between the project team of the Cluster of Excellence (see below) and external experts in the field of religious fundamentalism. By taking part in presentations and discussions, the participants will not only get a deep insight into research on fundamentalism in various world religions and cultural contexts but will also receive constructive feedback from this team of experts for his/her own studies.

Recent contributions to the field have been challenging common definitions, measurements, as well as explanatory approaches of religious fundamentalism especially against the backdrop of various world religions and of an increasing globalized world. On one hand, this calls into question the relationship between religious traditionalism, fundamentalism, and (acceptance of) violence. On the other hand, research on religious fundamentalism beyond Christianity and Islam as well as beyond the North-American and Western-European context is usually neglected. In this workshop, we want to bring experts together, who contribute to these contemporary issues of fundamentalism research from a theoretical or an empirical perspective.

With this announcement, we want to call for abstracts from scholars, who are highly motivated to present and discuss their scholarly work by participating in a two-day interdisciplinary and international workshop of experts in this field. We are interested in both papers that deal with the phenomenon of fundamentalism on a theoretical level and papers that empirically approach the phenomenon on the basis of (a) selected case(s). Contributions from sociology, psychology, religious studies, political science, theology, or related fields are highly welcome. With this workshop, our objective is to constitute a starting point for future collaborations and dialogue from which the participants can sustainably benefit (e.g., future research projects, publications).

Together with a CV, a convincing abstract of a maximum of 500 words is requested by April 15, 2020 and should be submitted by email to:

  • Dr. Sarah Demmrich, project leader of “Religious Fundamentalism“ at Cluster of Excellence “Religion & Politics“: kabogan@uni-muenster.de

Successful applicants are going to be informed shortly after. All expenses for attendance, travel, and accommodation of accepted participants are going to be covered by the project. For any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact the project leader. We are looking forward to your applications.

With our very best regards,
Dr. Sarah Demmrich
Prof. Dr. Detlef Pollack
Dr. Olaf Müller

American Academy of Religion – Sociology of Religion

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Call for Proposals

The purpose of the Sociology of Religion program Unit of the American Academy of Religion is to bridge the gap and generate cross-fertilization between the Sociology of Religion and Religious Studies. We are open to papers in all areas and therefore encourage submissions of any topic relevant to the sociology of religion. This year, we are particularly interested in the following topics:

• Topics related to Boston (and the contributions of prominent sociologists in the region)
• Links between capitalism, consumerism, neoliberalism and climate change issues
• Conflicting identities (intersectional identities in conflict)
• Disciplinary boundaries between sociology of religion and religious studies
• Sociology of knowledge – especially an exploration of the relationship between religion and STEM
• In anticipation of the 2020 US Election, we are interested in panels that are NOT about Trump and do not perpetrate a narrative of American exceptionalism (i.e. panels that explore religion alongside politics, elections, national identity, race, and populism in a global context)

We are also in the process of planning sessions on the following topics:
• Revisiting Religion and the Public Sphere (prearranged session on Habermas’ new work)
• Co-sponsored with the Critical Theory and Discourses on Religion Program Unit: Putting the social back into the sociology of religion (and religious studies in general): a round table with Veronique Altglas (invited panel discussion)

Publication:
The Sociology of Religion Group of AAR regularly co-sponsors panels with the peer-reviewed print and online journal Critical Research on Religion (CRR) (http://crr.sagepub.com). Published by SAGE Publications, the journal is ranked as first tier by Scopus and has over 10,000 subscriptions worldwide. Presenters of promising papers in SOR panels will be invited to turn their papers into articles and submit them for peer review to CRR.

Guidelines for Submitting Proposals

• Step 1: Find a topic in the general Call for Proposals or Call of a specific Program Unit that interests you.

• Step 2: Determine which type of proposal you wish to submit.

  • Paper proposal — A paper written by you (and possibly a coauthor) that you will present in response to a theme within a Program Unit’s Call.
  • Papers session proposal — A proposal of a complete session of different papers on a theme, complete with its own description, abstract, a presider, paper presentations, and (optionally) a respondent. Presenters in a papers session must submit their proposals to the papers session organizer, who in turn is responsible for inputting them into the Program Administration Proposal, Evaluation, Review, and Submission (PAPERS) System .
  • Roundtable session proposal — A proposal of a complete session, including a presider, list of panelists, and (optionally) a respondent; all of whom will speak (ex tempore) on a common theme.

• Step 3: Write your 7,500 character (including spaces) proposal and 1200-character (including spaces) abstract. Paper sessions require a separate7,500 character proposal and 1200-character abstract for each paper in the session. The abstracts will be listed in the Online Program Book.

• Step 4: Submit your proposal via the method requested by the Program Unit no later than Monday, March 2. Most Program Units have elected to use the online PAPERS system only. Carefully note any audiovisual equipment you require before you submit your proposal.

  • PAPERS: Submit your 7,500 character (including spaces) proposal and 1200-character (including spaces) abstract via the Program Administration Proposal, Evaluation, Review, and Submission (PAPERS) system. NB: Do not place your name or other identifying remarks in the body of the proposal field or abstract field in PAPERS; this may endanger the anonymous review process of the Unit and acceptance of your proposal may be jeopardized. Your name and contact information is sent automatically with the proposal. For help using the PAPERS system, please consult the PAPERS User Manual or if you still require assistance, email support@aarweb.org.
  • E-mail: Submit your 7,500 character (including spaces) proposal and 1200-character (including spaces) abstract within the BODY of ONE single e-mail to the contacts listed in the Program Unit’s call (usually the Chairs). Attach the Participant Form for E-mail Submission. Please be sure you use the exact same title on the Participant Form for E-mail Submission as you do on the e-mailed proposal. Proposals received without the participant forms will be disqualified. Participant forms received without proposals or abstracts will also be disqualified. If you are requested by the Program Unit to submit a copy to both co-Chairs or Steering Committee members, follow the instructions listed. If no one person is specified, send your complete proposal to either one of the co-Chairs.
  • E-mail with Attachments: Submit your 7,500 character (including spaces) proposal and 1200-character (including spaces) abstract, and Participant Form as attachments in one single e-mail to the contacts listed in the Program Unit’s call (usually the Chairs). Attach the Participant Form for E-mail Submission. Be sure you use the exact same title on the Participant Form for E-mail Submission as you do on the attached proposal you e-mail. Proposals received without the participant forms will be disqualified. Participant forms received without proposals or abstracts will also be disqualified.

• Step 5: Notification of your proposal’s acceptance status for the Annual Meeting program will be sent by April 1, 2020.

https://papers.aarweb.org/pu/sociology-religion-unit

https://papers.aarweb.org/content/general-call-proposals-instructions

Calls for Manuscripts for Special Issue on Religion, Gender and Violence

Religion and Gender Journal

The journal Religion and Gender invites article proposals for a special issue on Religion, Gender and Violence. The relationship between religion and violence is highly contested and has come under considerable scrutiny by scholars of religion.  Less understood is the relationship between gender, religion and violence and this special issue aims to contribute to understandings of the ways in which religion intersects with institutional, familial and public gendered violence as explored through current research via an interdisciplinary lens.
With the current roll out of public inquiries into institutional child sexual abuse across Ireland, England and Wales, Scotland, Europe, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, it is clear that at a global level, it is religious organizations that have had the most widespread and highest levels of abuse against children with characteristically poor institutional responses to victims and their families. Public inquires have clearly established that religious organizations made strategic decisions to limit reputational damage at the cost of child safety and the implications of this for religious institutions is yet to be fully understood.

Violence against women and children in domestic settings where religion is a significant factor has also been the subject of ongoing and recent research indicating that there are specific issues at play for women and children in experiencing and reporting abuse and how it is managed by faith traditions. In important public debates on the status of gender diversity and difference, for example the marriage equality issue, there have been forceful responses to vulnerable cohorts from religious leaders, in social media and religious publications.
At the same time, there has been an important counter discourse articulated by religious groups around building religious and social capital that contributes to a pluralist understanding of the value of multi-religious societies and gender diversity. These discourses, most often articulated by more liberal religious groups but also increasingly by mainstream faith traditions, utilize the language of social justice and theological interpretation to construct narratives of gender inclusion and equity. This brings faith traditions into conflict within themselves over the framing of gender relations for the new century.

For this special issue, we invite manuscripts that address this convergence from a variety of perspectives on the function and meaning of gender, religion and violence and its counter-discourses.

The editors are particularly interested in receiving manuscripts that showcase empirical research that address, but are not limited to, the following areas and/or questions:

  • What role does gendered violence play in mainstream religious groups re maintenance of the faith tradition?
  • How are the impacts and experiences of gendered violence managed by religious organisations with regard to pastoral care and processes of remediation?
  • Who are the victims of gendered violence in religious organisations?
  • In what ways can feminist theory and theology contribute to and expand understandings of religion, gender and violence?
  • What role does non-religion and/or secularity play in relation to responding to and managing the disclosure of violence in religious organisations.
  • How well do public inquiries address gendered religious violence and what are the impacts on religious organisations with respect to particular case studies?

Submissions should be between 5000 and 8000 words in length (including abstract, footnotes and references). See Brill’s page for further information on submitting an article https://brill.com/view/journals/rag/rag-overview.xml .

Affiliation and email address should be supplied in the first submission. In order to guarantee a blind review process, all submissions should be anonymized with the name of and references to the author removed from the text. We are happy to receive inquiries about prospective submissions.

Please send all queries to the special issues editors:

SUBMISSION DATES
15 January 2020: Abstract Submission
15 August 2020: Full manuscript submission