Call for Papers: Waikato Islamic Studies Review

http://www.waikato.ac.nz/fass/UWISG/review.shtml

On behalf of the University of Waikato Islamic Studies Group, I warmly invite submissions of papers which examine Islam in the widest sense to the Waikato Islamic Studies Review for publication consideration.

Articles can be as short as 2000 words and up to a maximum of 5000. For full details regarding paper guidelines and submissions and the Waikato Islamic Studies Review please see:http://www.waikato.ac.nz/fass/UWISG/review.shtml

If you have any questions please feel free to contact me asap if you think that you might like your work considered; the next edition is due for publication in March 2021. 

Kind regards,
Abdullah Drury
Editor: Waikato Islamic Studies Review
Email: abdullah@xtra.co.nz

Call for Papers: Transformations of Latin American Catholicism

Call for Papers: Transformations of Latin American Catholicism since the mid-20th Century for International Journal of Latin American Religions

http://bit.ly/2Y62UIc

Call for Papers: Transformations of Latin American Catholicism since the mid-20th Century

The International Journal of Latin American Religions (JLAR) invites researchers to submit manuscripts to a thematic section focused on considerable relatively recent changes in Latin American Catholicism. The pluralization of the religious field that has marked most Latin American countries and the new social dynamic that has led to new political experiences and ideological spectrums both present themselves as important ingredients of the analytical background in Latin American Catholicism transformations. Under the impact of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) and countless socio-economic transformations, Catholicism in the region has also experienced significant mutations, presenting new amalgamations and social expressions. The thematic section will gather articles presenting research results from various disciplines and academic perspectives dealing with many contemporary expressions of Catholicism in the Latin American region since the mid-20th century.

This thematic section will be part of the second issue of volume 5, to be published in December 2021, and will have as guest editors Dr. Renata Siuda-Ambroziak, American Studies Center, University of Warsaw, Poland, and Dr. Rodrigo Coppe Caldeira, Pontifical University of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Submissions are due by June 30, 2021.

Call for Papers Uniwersyteckie Czasopismo Socjologiczne/Academic Journal of Sociology

Uniwersyteckie Czasopismo Socjologiczne/Academic Journal of Sociology
According to the legend, in May1973 David Bowie was travelling through Poland back from a tourist journey from Moscow. At the Warszawa Gdańska station the train had a very long technical stop. It was used by the British artist to walk into the city and by chance buy a vinyl with the songs performed by the folklore band “Śląsk” at a local music store. We can find echoes of this accidental meeting today on his album “LOW” in the song “Warszawa”. We would like to follow this path and that is why we decided to focus on the topic of the influence of Polish culture on the broadly understood world culture and technology.

You are welcome to contribute to the newest issue of the ‘Uniwersyteckie Czasopismo Socjologiczne / Academic Journal of Sociology’. The topic of the issues will be one hundred and fifty years of the influence of Polish culture on world science, literature, music and technology.

You are expected to focus on the topics in sociology, cultural studies, musicology, literary studies, and history. They will touch upon the strong Polish accent of the global reception of its cultural systems, which would be treated on two different levels:

  1. As the influence of the Polish culture in the form of famous names of Polish artists;
  2. And as the reception and presence of elements of the Polish culture in the works of foreign artists, scientists and other creative personalities.

The texts that touch upon the following issues, are especially welcome:

  • – the influence of Polish scientists on the world science, among them Aleksander Czekanowski, Stefan Banach (we would happily accept articles also about the works of Florian Znaniecki or Ludwig Gumplowicz);
  • – the influence of Polish male and female writers and poets on world literature (W. Gombrowicz, R. Gary, W. Szymborska), referring to the last name of the famous poet, a Noble Prize winner, we would be happy to accept, among others, articles about the work of the other Polish Nobel Prize winners);
  • – the influence of the Polish composers, musicians as well as painters and directors that remained outside Poland (Mieczysław Weinberg, Zbigniew Preisner, Roman Polański, Zdzisław Beksiński);
  • – the reception of Polish science in tje global technology (e.g. the discoveries of the ancestor of the “Silicon valley” Jan Czochralski or K-202 by Jacek Karpiński)
  • – the reception of Polish culture in music, science, literature, photography, cinematography etc.

Deadline for the abstract/outline submission:
31 December 2020 to email: m.choczynski@uksw.edu.pl

Deadline for the paper submission:
31 January 2021 to email: m.choczynski@uksw.edu.pl

The text should be no more than 24,000 characters (with footnotes and a list of cited works) and must be adapted to the standards of citation / footnotes that is found on the journal website(Uniwersyteckie Czasopismo Socjologiczne/Academic Journal of Sociology).

Please attach to your paper your short academic profile (up to 500 characters), affiliation, a list of works cited in the paper and a summary in Polish and English with keywords.

Leading Editors: Tomasz Michał Korczyński, Marcin Choczyński

Prize: Best Doctoral Thesis or First Monograph in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World

The Sixth Round of the BRAIS-De Gruyter Prize in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World is now open for submissions.

The British Association for Islamic Studies (BRAIS) and De Gruyter are delighted to announce the sixth round of the BRAIS-De Gruyter Prize in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World. This international prize will be awarded annually to the best doctoral thesis or unpublished first monograph based on a doctoral thesis. English-language submissions on any aspect of the academic study of Islam and the Muslim world, past and present, including Muslim-minority societies are accepted. Applicants can be based in any country, and manuscripts will be assessed on the basis of scholarly quality and originality.

The award includes publication of the winning manuscript and a prize of £1,000, and it will be officially presented at the Annual Conference of BRAIS. The selection process will be undertaken by a seven-member prize committee comprising established academics from across the field.

Deadline: 5.00 pm GMT, 31 December 2020

For more details, including rules and regulations, contact, the past Prize winners, and the Prize committee members, please visit: http://www.brais.ac.uk/prize/2021

Call for Papers: Special Journal Issue: “Religion and Public Health Threats in the 21st Century”

Special Issue on Religion and Public Health in the journal Religions is seeking papers. The call for papers can be found here: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/Religion_Century. Submission deadline for completed papers is June 1, 2021, but we encourage early submissions. Religions is an open access journal, but a 50% discount on publication fee (final cost approx. 500CHF) will be offered to selected good quality papers. If you don’t have funding support and have concerns about the fees, please state so in your cover letter. In addition to the Special Issue online, accepted papers (if 10 or more) will be published in printed book format. Please direct any inquiries to Magdalena Szaflarski, PhD, Guest Editor, at szaflam@uab.edu.

Call for Papers: Special Issue on “Religious Communities in Exile and Diaspora”

The open access journal Religions is preparing a special issue on “Religious Communities in Exile and Diaspora”.  Dr. Ellen Posman (Baldwin Wallace University) is Guest Editor.

Religions is an international, open-access scholarly journal. It is indexed in A&HCI (Web of Science), ATLA Religion Database and in SCOPUS,  which gave it a Citescore of 0.50 and listed it among the top 9% of the 462 religious studies journals SCOPUS surveyed in 2018.

Papers may be submitted from now until 28 February 2021, as papers will be published on an ongoing basis. Submitted papers should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere.

If you would like to contribute, please email Dr. Posman by 12/31/2020 with a title and
abstract (email: eposman@bw.edu, subject: Religions abstract).

Call for Papers: Review of Religious Research

Review of Religious Research (RRR) publishes empirical social-science research on religion, primarily in sociology and social psychology, and scholarly literature reviews of religious research in these fields.

In keeping with its mission, the Religious Research Association (RRA), which sponsors RRR, encourages research that has practical implications for denominations and religious bodies.

RRR provides a forum for applied and academic research across multiple disciplines and approaches, including research on the following topical areas: Clergy; Church programs; Comparative analyses of religious denominations and institutions; Denominational and congregational growth, decline, and vitality; Denominational and congregational conflict, competition, and cooperation; Ethnicity/race and religion; Generational and personal religious change; New religious movements; Personal spiritual and religious beliefs and practices; Religion and attitudes; Religion and family; Religion and gender, Religion and social behavior; Religion and well-being; and Research methodology.

Four types of articles are included in this Call for Papers:

  • Original Research Articles
  • Research Notes
  • Review Articles, and
  • Applied Research Abstracts.

Original Research Article: This type of article must be a scholarly and methodologically sophisticated empirical study that provides a comprehensive literature review of the relevant topics related to the research question, and it should have a strong theoretical foundation. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 10,000 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Research Note: This type of article must also be a scholarly and methodologically sophisticated empirical study, but its research question does not have to be theory based, and its literature review should be shorter and more focused. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 7,500 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Review Article: Authors should send an email directly to the RRR Editor-in-Chief (kjflannelly@gmail.com) describing the nature and scope of a proposed literature review to see if it is suitable for publication in RRR before they submit it. The final section of the manuscript should be labeled Conclusions and Implications. A 250-350 word structured Abstract is also required, which contains the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, especially implications for religious organizations and/or practitioners when appropriate. The manuscript should also contain a methodology section that explains how the literature search was conducted and how articles were selected for inclusion in the review. Submitted manuscripts should be double-spaced and be no more than 10,000 words, excluding the title page, abstract, tables, figure captions, and references.

Applied Research Abstract: This type of article consists of a 350-550 word summary (without any references) of an applied research study in the form of a structured abstract with the following five section headings: Background, Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions and Implications, followed by 3-4 keywords. The author(s) may include a footnote that states: (a) whether a complete report exists and how it can be obtained; (b) whether the raw data are available in electronic form and how they can be obtained if the authors wish to make them available to other researchers; and/or (c) whether the authors would like to collaborate with other researchers to further analyze the data and write a full report for possible journal publication as a peer-reviewed manuscript.

GUIDELINES

  • Statistical Methodology – Original Research Articles/Research Notes: Quantitative studies should use the most appropriate statistical procedures needed to answer the research question, which include adequate statistical controls (e.g., using demographic variables as covariates that are known to be associated with the religious variables in the study).
  • Sampling Methodology – Original Research Articles/Research Notes: Both quantitative and qualitative studies should meet sociological standards of representativeness (RRR does not publish studies based solely on convenience sampling). Therefore, qualitative studies published in RRR must employ more systematic and representative approaches to sampling than most qualitative studies do. Convenience sampling can only be employed during the last step in the sampling process, usually after (a) drawing random samples from national or regional surveys, or datasets maintained by religious or other kinds of organizations, or (b) sampling congregations from different cities, states, or regions, or (c) selecting church programs, denominations, congregations, or other social groups that meet specified inclusion criteria.

Editorial Decision-making Process

All four types of manuscripts are initially read by the Editor-in-Chief to determine if they are generally appropriate for publication in RRR based on the guidelines described in this Call for Papers. All manuscripts that are deemed to be appropriate, except Applied Research Abstracts, then undergo blind peer-review by two or more qualified researchers. The Editor-in-Chief is solely responsible for publication decisions about Applied Research Abstracts. Editorial decisions are based on whether a manuscript: (a) poses a clear and valid research question; (b) makes a meaningful contribution to the field; (c) provides appropriate evidence or reasoning for its conclusions; (d) is written in an intelligible fashion in standard English; and (e) conforms to the guidelines described herein.

Your manuscript should be submitted at https://www.editorialmanager.com/rorr/default.aspx

After you login and select “New Manuscript Submission,” you need to select the appropriate type of article and follow the rest of the directions.

Manuscript Submission and Processing Fee: Authors who are not RRA members are required to pay a $35 manuscript processing fee before their manuscript undergoes peer-review. This fee can be paid by joining the RRA, whose annual membership is $35.

  • Authors must submit a cover letter with their submission that covers: (a) RRA membership and this fee; (b) the topical areas with which the manuscript fits; (c) and some other items about the manuscript.
  • Please see the “Cover Letter” and “Fee” sections of the RRR “Instructions for Authors” for more details (https://www.springer.com/journal/13644/submission-guidelines#Instructions%20for%20authors ), including examples of cover letters.

Religion & Evolutionary/Biological Science

If anyone with expertise in connections between sociology of religion and evolutionary/biological sciences is interested in writing an essay for the series described below, please contact me (ldpearce@unc.edu) by noon, Monday, May 18th.

-Lisa

Announcing a new series of short essays on the connection between sociology and the biological and evolutionary sciences. Never has it been more important to re-examine this connection in the light of the current pandemic and its aftermath. The essays will be published in the online magazine This View of Life, which is at the forefront of publishing academically informed content on all aspects of human affairs from an evolutionary perspective. TVOL reaches a diverse audience of academic professionals, public policy experts and the informed general public across the world (typically between 30K-50K pageviews/mo). The essays will be published first individually to be the center of attention and then collected into a special issue for long term visibility (go here for current special issues). We expect that our special issue will provide a foundation for further discussion and exploration of collaborative potential.

The essays should reflect upon the following theme:

A biologically evolved virus finds an environmental niche it can successfully exploit and upends human society.  Whether we celebrate or fear modern technology, whether we applaud or dismiss science, whether we view health as a personal or public concern, an invisible pathogen forces us to recognize our interdependence both with the natural world and with each other.

Of course, sociology begins with the importance of social connection, highlights the social processes that shape human outcomes, and takes account of social groups and the cultures they create when explaining human behavior.  And we now know that these insights take us back to, not away from, our evolved biology:  that the environment influences genetic expression; that culture influences evolutionary change; that the need for group support and social connection are the evolved lodestone of our species and are reflected in the functioning of our brains.

The COVID -19 crisis provides an opportunity for sociologists to reflect upon the history of evolutionary thinking and current understandings in their area, and the potential benefits and costs of a more transdisciplinary vision. These reflections, representing the full diversity of sociological perspectives, will be valuable in their own right in addition to their relevance to the current moment. Hence, explicit connections to the COVID-19 crisis are encouraged but should not overshadow the theme of the past, present, and future of evolutionary thinking in the discipline.

The essays should be approximately 1000 words in length, which is enough for a concise statement and can link to the larger literature. We have flexibility in due dates but would like to receive at least some essays by June 1. Authors will receive guidelines about formatting and other details.

This project is a collaboration between Russell Schutt (current chair of the Evolution, Biology and Society section), Rengin Firat (EBS Council member), David Sloan Wilson (Editor in Chief of TVOL) and Eric Michael Johnson (Managing Editor of TVOL).  David has made foundational contributions to theories of social evolution and Eric’s recently completed PhD thesis is on the early impact of Darwin’s Theory on sociological thinking.  Russ studies social engagement in relation to organizational functioning and health outcomes, with connections to social neuroscience, evolutionary theory, and psychosocial treatments for serious mental illness.  Rengin’s research focuses on inter-group relations and racial disparities of health and well-being with a neurosociological approach.

Lisa D. Pearce
Professor and Interim Associate Chair of Sociology
Faculty Fellow, Carolina Population Center
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

http://lisapearce.web.unc.edu/

CFP: Special Issue "Islamic and Muslim Studies in Australia"

Special Issue Information: See online CFP at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/Australia_muslim

Dear Colleagues,

The growth of Muslim populations globally, in the Asia–Pacific region, and in Australia means Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia are increasingly important. Over the past two decades, Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia have grown along with some notable contributions to the scholarly literature, including the Melbourne University Press Islamic Studies Series. However, research on Islam and Muslims in Australia tends to receive less attention than in other Western countries. This Special Issue will contribute to filling this gap.

The aim of this Special Issue of the open-access journal Religions is to showcase some of the most important research currently being undertaken in Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia. The papers will address the challenging and often unprecedented phenomena concerning Islam and Muslim Australians that have developed particularly since the turn of the century. Scholars in the fields of Islamic and Muslim studies are invited to submit papers on Islamic religious thought and practice; Islamic groupings and organisations; migration, settlement and integration; citizenship and belonging; social cohesion and intercommunity relations; Islamophobia, radicalisation and extremism; national and community security; and other issues concerning the historic and contemporary conditions, experiences and representations of Islam and Muslims in Australia.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Halim Rane
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Call for Paper Proposals: Religion and the Coronavirus Pandemic

The Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture (JSRNC) is calling for paper proposals exploring the entanglements of religion, the Coronavirus, and socioecological (aka biocultural) systems.

We seek scholarly work that explores how the virus, and religious dimensions of the response to it are influencing, and may decisively reshape socioecological systems, including religious perceptions and practices.

Pandemics are nothing new in human and religious history, of course. Indeed, religion and disease have long been entwined as people struggled to understand the mysterious origins of diseases and why they sometimes cause mass deaths and concomitant social and ecological disasters. Unsurprisingly, invisible spiritual beings or forces, which influence if not control environmental conditions, have often been postulated to explain the invisible-to-the-naked eye organisms that precipitate diseases and disasters. Some theorists even contend that the roots of religion may lie in the existential crises precipitated by disease and death.

Although the history of religion is replete with examples in which disease has played an important role, there may be novelty in the current pandemic and fresh insights about the diversity of religion-related responses to it. Indeed, if apocalypse means the end of the world as we know it, the current pandemic may well precipitate profound, destructive changes.

Yet as with much apocalyptic expectation, perhaps after its tribulations new and positive ways of being in the world will emerge that were previously hidden from human imaginations – or only envisioned by previously marginalized individuals and groups.

We have provided examples of social phenomena and specific questions that we think would be fitting for analysis under the heading “Further Information for Interested Scholars” at our web-based CFP: https://issrnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Coronavirus-Special-CFP_JSRNC.pdf

By 15 June 2020 interested scholars should send prospective titles, a summary of the proposed paper (300-500 words), and ideally, relevant references, to JSRNC Managing Editor Amanda Nichols via amnv22@ufl.edu. Papers will be due 1 October 2020. All manuscripts will undergo the JSRNC’s full editorial review process, including double-blind peer review, before publication. Those requiring a later due date should discuss that with JSRNC Editor-in-Chief Bron Taylor via bron@ufl.edu.