SocRel Stream Plenary at BSA Conference

The Sociology of Religion study group will be hosting its own stream plenary at the BSA Annual Conference, Challenging Social Hierarchies and Inequalities, Glasgow Caledonian University 24–26 April 2019.

The plenary is titled ‘Religion and The Good’ with keynote speakers, Prof Chris Baker (Goldsmiths), Prof Gordon Lynch (University of Kent) and Dr Marta Trzebiatowska (University of Aberdeen). The session is intended to explore the idea of the good and morality in shaping social life and how religion connects to such meaning making, while also exploring what does ‘the good’ mean in different spaces and spheres. It will consider how religion responds to notions of ‘the common good’ and the different forms morality and ethical meaning making might take within religions and beyond. The stream plenary is scheduled for 9:30-10:30 Thursday 25th April.

To register for the conference please visit: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/key-bsa-events/bsa-annual-conference-2019-challenging-social-hierarchies-and-inequalities/

Call for Papers: “Mosques, families and Islamic Law”

‘Danish Mosques – Significance, Use and Influence’ together with the ‘Nordic Mosques Research network’ invites papers and applications for participation. This will be the first workshop as part of the HS-NOS funding and the mid-term conference in the Danish Mosques research project.

The workshop will take place at in Göteborg in Sweden at the Hotel Panorama from 21st to 23rd August 2019.

The deadline for the call for papers is May 1st, 2019.

All contact should be addressed to Niels Valdemar Vinding, lbm993@hum.ku.dk

https://mosques.ku.dk/activities/mosques-families-and-islamic-law/

Call for Papers

For this workshop, we invite scholars and researchers in the Nordic countries (and beyond) that work in the intersection of mosques, family and Islamic law. Mosques are widely understood as Muslim institutions in the discursivity of Islam. Similarly, Islamic law is widely defined as Islamic ethics, norms and practice. In our view and in legal terms, the biggest challenge for mosques and Muslims in the Nordic countries is building authentic and responsive legal institutions that may help Muslims in their ethnic, social and legal dilemmas and problems, where Western society seems to disappoint. There is a significant degree of experimentation and different attempts at articulating a religious legal identity and institutions amongst Muslims in the Nordic countries. This has been going on for a number of years, but now seems to be quasi-institutionalised to point where we are able to find legal documents, interview people and observe the process of legal institutionalization.

However, currently Muslim legal institutions are reaching out to governments and courts to better regulate and establish their practices to mitigate the significant risk of having their work deemed illegitimate and even illegal. The most significant legal concern by far is Muslim family law with the fear of parallel legal orders and subversive counter-normativity.

The operable questions for the workshop are; how are Muslims in mosques (and beyond) articulating their legal, ethical and normative identities? What kind of institutions are being build? How many so-called Islamic councils are there in the Nordic countries? How are they seen and used by Muslims? What kind of Islamic law and ethics issues are seen by the courts and quasi-courts in the Nordic countries, such as family matters, divorce, mediation, inherence, honour, polygamy? How do the courts and the legal systems in general approach and address these issues?

We are inviting submissions for papers as well as for participation in the workshop. We will give preference to papers to be presented during the workshop. For paper presentations, we are expecting written contributions to either an upcoming special issue of a leading journal or to a concluding anthology on Nordic Mosques in Context.

Paper abstracts of 300 words or expressions of interest in participation and a short CV to be submitted to Niels Valdemar Vinding, lbm993@hum.ku.dk, on May 1st 2019 at the latest.

Workshop Series Theme

This is the first in a series of three workshops on Nordic Mosques in Context – On the institutional embeddedness of Islam in the Nordic countries sponsored by a NOS-HS Workshop Grant. The second is on ”Mosques, power and politics,” in Copenhagen, Denmark, in January 2020, and the third is on ”Mosques, communities and finance,” in Oslo, Norway, August 2020. The purpose of the workshops is to investigate the dimensions of institutional embeddedness of Islam in the Nordic countries as mosques seek to be responsive institutions for the needs of Muslims, challenged by economic, legal and political alternatives. We are considering mosques as the focal point of Islam in economic, legal and political terms, the primary objective of this research project is to study the institutional strategies of mosques and Muslims in embedding Islam in the Nordic wider societies. The key here is to see to what extend mosques are responsive institutions for the needs of Muslim in soliciting the wider public, or if Muslims go beyond the mosque in the pursuit of other more apt forms of institutionalised religious life such as invoking Islamic economic, legal and political responses. We argue that the entire future of mosques depends on whether they can give and refine responsive and meaningful answers and make them coherent with the economic, legal and politics questions that Muslims seek the answers to. As such, this may result in the secularisation of mosques as they negotiate and find their place in society. Will these new or re-interpreted institutional expressions clash with the general public, will they fail Muslims or will they be viable alternatives for embedding Islam in the Nordic countries?

Workshop structure

We are aiming to conduct this workshop from the afternoon on Wednesday 21st August and finish with lunch on Friday 23rd August. All accepted participants will have flights, trains and other public transportation and hotel costs covered. We are organising a programme with keynotes, paper sessions with 20 minutes presentation and 10 minutes Q&A, as well as an afternoon open to the public and local stakeholders.

Conveners

Brian Arly Jacobsen, assoc. professor, Sociology of Religion, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Torkel Brekke, Research Professor, Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Norway

Göran Larsson, Professor in Religious Studies, Göteborg University, Sweden

Niels Valdemar Vinding, post.doc., Islamic Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Interdisciplinary symposium *Pentecostal Charismatic Christianity and Migration*.

Date: 2-3 of August, 2019

Venue: Parramatta City Campus, Western Sydney University

169 Macquarie St, Parramatta, NSW, Australia

Abstracts due: 10 of April 2019 (title, 250-word abstract, short bio)

Submit to: Dr Kathleen Openshaw k.openshaw@westernsydney.edu.au

Keynote Speaker: Associate Prof Richard Vokes (University of Western Australia)

Symposium Conveners:

Prof Cristina Rocha, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU

Prof Mark Hutchinson, Alphacrucis College

Dr Kathleen Openshaw, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU

Mrs Ingrid Ryan, Alphacrucis College

Symposium Theme

Over the past few decades, Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity (PCC) has exploded in the Global South and grown considerably in the Global North. Much of this grow this fuelled by networks of megachurches, the mobility of community leaders across diasporic networks, migration and media. While traditionally missionaries would travel in a North-to- South direction, more recently megachurches from the Global South have moved horizontally, across to other developing countries, and also made inroads in to the Global North in efforts of reverse missionisation. Such attempts to missionise to locals in the Global North have been largely (though not wholly) unsuccessful and churches have turned their focus to migrants from the Global South. Many studies have shown that migrants, who were not attached to PCCs before migration, join churches in the diaspora as they offer them a home away from home. Meanwhile, diasporic churches also face difficulties keeping these (as well as second generation) migrants, since they may prefer local churches in an effort to integrate. In this symposium we probe these themes and are seeking papers on the following topics:

  • Historical developments
  • Missionary activities and migration
  • Translocal and transnational PCC networks
  • Translocal and transnational families and PCC
  • Young migrants and PCC
  • Second generation migrants and PCC
  • Gender, PCC and migration
  • City infrastructures and diasporic churches
  • Theological themes and migration
  • Cultural translation, negotiation, adaptation of migrant churches
  • PCC, media, music, information communication Technologies and migration
  • Material culture and migrants’ lived experiences in PCC churches
  • Aesthetics and embodied practices
  • Immobility, borders and PCC

Cristina

Professor Cristina Rocha

Director of Religion and Society Research Cluster

Western Sydney University

President: Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Call for conference organisers – Socrel 2020

Dear colleagues,

Socrel invites proposals for an organising team, theme and venue for the Annual Conference in July 2020. If you would like to host Socrel’s next conference at your university or a suitable conference centre, we encourage you to submit a proposal by May 24th 2019

This is an excellent opportunity to host a prestigious and fully-supported conference (including international keynotes and bursaries).

About Socrel and the annual conference
Socrel is the Sociology of Religion Study Group of the British Sociological Association (BSA). It is the second largest study group in the BSA and has been in operation for over 40 years. Socrel currently has over 200 active members and organises a range of events each year, including the annual conference, a Socrel response day focused on an issue of particular current relevance and a study day for postgraduate and early career researchers. Socrel publishes one edited volume each year with Routledge.
The theme of a Socrel conference should be distinctive enough to form a focus for discussion, but broad enough to allow a wide range of sociologists of religion, postgraduates, and other scholars interested in social scientific study of religion to relate the conference to their own work. Over the last ten years Socrel conference themes have included: On the Edge? Centres and Margins in the Sociology of Religion (2017), Construction and disruption: The power of religion in the public sphere (2016), Foundations and Futures (2015), Religion and Crisis (2014), Material Religion (2013), Religion and Inequalities (2012), Religion and Social Theory (2011), The Changing Face of Christianity (2010), Religion and Knowledge (2009), Religion and Youth (2008), Religion and Media (2007) and Religion and the Individual (2006).

The Annual Conference will take place over three days in early -mid July. Socrel’s annual conferences attract 100-140 participants. Your venue should be able to provide lecture or seminar rooms for at least four parallel sessions and accommodation for at least 100 overnight guests.

Your organising team will be supported by the Socrel committee and the BSA Events Team.

Please visit: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/sociology-of-religion-study-group/  for more information about this year’s conference and the group.

Proposal details
Your proposal should include the following headings:

  1. Conference title and theme, with an explanation (no more than 300 words) of why you believe this theme will make for an interesting and successful conference
  2. Suggested dates for the conference, which should be held in July
  3. Your proposed venue for the conference, including a brief explanation of why you believe this venue is appropriate
  4. A list of the team members who will help you to organise this conference (the principal organisers must be Socrel members).
  5. Suggested keynote speakers
  6. A list of the major sub themes you hope to include among the conference presentations. What will people be talking about at your event?

If you have any questions, or would like to discuss your ideas before submitting a formal proposal, please contact the Socrel Conference and Events Officer, Rachael Shillitoe, at Rachael.shillitoe@york.ac.uk

Call for Session Proposals: ISA 4th Forum of Sociology–Deadline March 15, 2019

Call for Sessions
ISA Forum of Sociology
Porto Alegre, Brazil July 14 -18, 2020
Research Committees, Working and Thematic Groups of the International Sociological Association solicit session proposals for the forthcoming Fourth ISA Forum of Sociology.
Session proposals (250 words) in English, Spanish and/or French must be submitted by March 15, 2019 through the ISA online system available at: https://www.isa-sociology.org/en/conferences/forum/porto-alegre-2020

No extension of deadline is possible.

Kind regards,
International Sociological Association

CFP: Conference on Racism and Religion 2019

Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism

Uppsala University

6-8 NOVEMBER, 2019

  • Submission of abstracts: 30 April (200 words)
  • Session proposal: 30 April (400 words)
  • Decision on acceptance: 15 May
  • Registration opens: 1 September
  • Registration closes: 30 September
  • Conference fees: Regular 1 500 SEK. PhD Student 1 000 SEK

The histories of racism and religion are entangled. To understand how processes of racism, nationalism, and exclusion come about in different forms we need to view these developments as intertwined with religion and ideas of religion and religiosity.

The rise of islamophobia and antisemitism, discrimination and violent persecution of minorities in the name of religion or secularism, and controversies around the visibility of religious practices in public space, all point to the need for a deeper understanding of in what ways religion historically and in the present plays a central role in producing and upholding racism and colonial practices/structures.

Religion has also played a central role in counter movements such as civil rights, indigenous rights, anti-colonial and, anti-apartheid movements. An additional aspect to explore is religious symbols and representations that have been part of anti-racist art and music and the place of spiritualism in artistic resistance to racism. What role has and does religion play in developing and upholding racist and nationalist structures? In what ways are different entangled forms of racism and religion being manifested? How can we for example understand antisemitism and islamophobia on a global and local scale? What does it mean to be living in a supposedly post-racial, post-secular world? What role does religion and/or spirituality play in antiracist struggles and movements?

The Center for Multidisciplinary Research on Racism (CEMFOR) invites scholars to send in abstracts for paper presentations and/or session proposals.

More information: http://cemfor.uu.se/events2/conference/conference-2019/

Call for Papers: The Future of British Muslim Studies: Cardiff, 24 April

We are very pleased to accounce the Call for Papers for the next MBRN conference at Cardiff. Details can be found below and at the following link:
http://www.mbrn.org.uk/call-for-papers-the-future-of-british-muslim-studies/

*****************
Call for Papers: The Future of British Muslim Studies
A one-day Muslims in Britain Research Network conference organised in partnership with the Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK, Cardiff University
Date: 24 April 2019

Since the Muslims in Britain Research Network was established over 25 years ago, British Muslim studies has grown exponentially. Yet despite this, the field faces significant challenges and uncertainty about its future direction. With so much of the focus on British Muslims being driven – both in academia and in wider society – by instrumental concerns about security and terrorism, much needed debates about the field’s core goals and purpose have often been obscured. The near constant use of research reports and polls on British Muslims in service of political agendas has meant that not only do those researching British Muslims often struggle to get their voices heard, but they are also forced to face difficult questions about their positioning and politics.

This one day event will bring together those from within and outside of academia who have an interest in shaping the study of Muslim Britain in order to discuss and debate the challenges facing the field and where it should go from here. What should British Muslim studies do, and who should it be for? Should it be seen as part of a project of improving Muslims’ rights and representation, as with the case of comparable fields like Black studies, or remain at a critical distance from Muslim politics? Is the field itself sufficiently inclusive of the diversity of Muslim and non-Muslim voices, and is sufficient recognition given to those outside the academy producing research into Muslims? When, and how, should academics partner with Muslim and community and activist groups? With researchers in the field scattered across disciplines, and with religion increasingly marginalised in the academy, how can the field cohere and have a positive impact?

Abstracts are invited for papers that address any of the conference themes:
  *   Emerging research agendas in, and challenges for, the field of British Muslim studies
  *   The politics of producing knowledge about Muslims in the West
  *   The relationship between academic scholarship and Muslims’ presence, voice and activism
  *   Partnerships between academic and Muslim community groups in the UK
  *   ‘Insider’ and ‘outsider’ dynamics in the study of British Muslims
  *   Complementarities and tensions between disciplinary approaches to the study of Muslims and Islam
  *   Securing the study of Muslims and Islam within and beyond UK higher education

Participants will be asked to present their research in a short format as part of a panel. To participate please send a 250 word abstract to the email address below by 1st March along with a biographical note of no more than 50 words.

Abstract submissions and any general questions should be sent to the conference organisers at MuslimsinBritainRN@gmail.com<mailto:MuslimsinBritainRN@gmail.com>.

Call for Sessions: 4th Forum of Sociology, Porto Alegre, Brazil — July 14-18, 2020

RESEARCH COMMITTEE 22: SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

Call for Session Proposals
4th ISA Forum of Sociology
July 15-18, 2020
(Session proposals due March 15, 2019)

 “Challenges of the 21st Century for Sociology of Religion

Program Coordinators:
Eloísa Martín, United Arab Emirates University, UAE
Juan Cruz Esquivel, University of Buenos Aires/ CONICET, Argentina
Roberta Bivar Carneiro, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil

The debate on religion, its role, its development, and its future has been intense, extensive and sophisticated during the last few decades. Religion is both a central phenomenon itself and a key variable that can be used to explain economic, social, and political phenomena.  Both facets require continuous in-depth research. In recent years, many sociologists have begun to identify limits to the current approach to religious phenomena, and especially to the definitions of religion developed in the West. A number of authors have extended this critique to the ways sociologists currently explain and interpret “religion” in the 21st Century. Though still emerging, such accounts have opened new paths by which sociologists of religion can face both the empirical and theoretical challenges of our era.

We invite proposals for sessions that focus both on the discussion and analysis of current religious phenomena, and especially on how – theoretically and methodologically – the sociology of religion has been dealing and should deal with these issues in the 21st Century. While proposals may focus on single perspectives or phenomena, we encourage those  that explore the nexus between different theoretical and methodological approaches. We welcome session proposals that examine the relationship between religion and democracy, ecology, inequality, diversity, intersectionality, human rights, social movements, digital activism, and migration, among others.

The ISA CONFEX website will be open for session proposals from February 4 – March 15, 2019 24:00 GMT. Sessions may only be submitted through the CONFEX site.  Programme coordinators cannot include sessions sent by email or include sessions submitted after the CONFEX system is closed.  Surf to http://bit.ly/2Gj9N0N to enter the CONFEX site.

Please, note that you must be an RC-22 member to submit a session proposal. You may also not chair a session in which you present a paper. In such cases, we suggest that you identify someone else to chair the session.

We welcome both pre-organized sessions (with pre-chosen panellists) and topical sessions that are open to paper proposals by others. You may propose regular paper sessions, Author-meets-critics sessions, and Roundtable sessions. Sessions should be designed to have 4-5 participants, plus several standby participants.  We wish to include as many scholars as possible, particularly from the global South.

In late March, the Program Coordinators will choose which sessions will appear on our program.  Once the sessions are chosen, individual paper proposals can be submitted through the CONFEX website from April 25 – September 30, 2019 24:00 GMT.  We will circulate another announcement with details of how to submit paper proposals before then.

Please address your questions to any of the Program Coordinators:

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF THIS CALL FOR SESSIONS

International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society, Annual Conference

Thursday 4th July – Saturday 6th July 2019

Edgbaston Park Hotel, Birmingham, UK.

Please note: support for attendance is available.

Organised by the Science and Belief in Society Research Group at the University of Birmingham, UK this is the first conference launching the new, International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society.

In the last decade there has been significant growth in social scientific scholarship on science and religion, complementing the more established historical research into the subject. Greater attention is being paid to the varied ways in which perceptions of science are influenced by religious and non-religious belief, identity, community and conflict in different geographical, cultural and historical contexts. The purpose of this international conference is to bring together researchers with backgrounds in sociology, science and technology studies, psychology, political science, history, social anthropology, and related humanities or social science disciplines to discuss perspectives on the overarching topic of science and belief in society.

Abstracts are invited for the conference relating to the following themes:

  • · The social scientific and historical study of the relationship between science and religious and/or non-religious belief and identity;
  • · Public perceptions of the relationship between science, religion and non-religion and their respective roles in society;
  • · National and international comparative perspectives on the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Past and present media or popular representations of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · The past or present roles of science, rationalism, religion and belief in national, social or cultural identity and related geopolitical narratives;
  • · Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of science, religion and non-religion in society;
  • · Methodological approaches to, and issues in, the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Avenues for future research and developments within the social scientific and historical study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Public policy research relating to any aspect of public policy that intersects with issues connected to science, religion and belief in society. Including studies on theimpact of publics’ views on science and religion on policy making, and provision for religious, spiritual or non-religious communities across a range of geographies and issues (e.g. healthcare provision, educational policy, science policy, environmental policy or development);
  • · International studies of religious or spiritual communities’ perspectives on the intersection, and possible relationships, between science and religion over time.

We are interested in papers that relate to any aspect of STEMM in society (science, technology, engineering, medicine, and mathematics) and that discuss any religious, spiritual or non-religious tradition, position or worldview, including unbelief.

Keynote papers will be given by historian Professor Peter Harrison, Australian Laureate Fellow and Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland (Australia), and psychologist Professor Cristine Legare, associate professor of psychology and the director of the Evolution, Variation, and Ontogeny of Learning Laboratory at The University of Texas at Austin (USA).

Individual paper submissions:

To submit a paper proposal, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 200 words including name, institutional affiliation, email address and if possible a web-link to your institutional bio page.

Biographies of successful applicants will be added to the International Network’s Research Directory when our new website launches in the spring. Please indicate on your application if you would like to opt out of being added to the Research Directory.

Panel session proposals:

We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals with a maximum of four speakers. To submit a panel proposal, please send a session summary of no more than 250 words alongside abstracts of no more than 300 words for each paper and biographical notes of no more than 200 words for each contributor (please include institutional affiliation(s), e-mail contact details, and other info as above).

Individual or panel session submissions may cross over several of the themes listed above, and those intending to submit papers are encouraged to consider the relevance of their work to other academic disciplines.

Please send all individual paper and session proposals to Dr Harris Wiseman (h.wiseman@bham.ac.uk) for the attention of the conference organisers, Professor Fern Elsdon-Baker (University of Birmingham), and Dr Alexander Hall (University of Birmingham).

All abstracts must be submitted by 1st March 2019.

Conference Costs and Bursaries:

Please note that for all successful applicants, accommodation and registration costs will be covered by the International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society as part of a 1 year grant from the Templeton Religion Trust.

In addition to this, a limited number of bursaries are available to support those who may not have institutional support to attend international conferences, including but not limited to: postgraduate, early career, retired, or low income or unwaged.  To request this additional support please e-mail Dr Harris Wiseman at h.wiseman@bham.ac.uk, including your contact details, a short biography (including a clear statement regarding your career stage), your abstract and a statement of interest to be considered for one of the bursaries. We also have a range of other bursaries for covering other needs (e.g. support with day care costs). The deadline for submission of bursary applications is 1st March 2019.

Please note that we will be running a fully funded early career workshop in the days prior to this conference, but this will be announced and advertised via a separate call.

Key Dates:

  • Abstract submission: Open now
  • Deadline for abstracts and conference bursary applications: 1st March 2019
  • Decision notification: 15th March 2019
  • Registration opens: 15th March 2019
  • Registration deadline for presenters: 29th March 2019

Call for Papers: "Religion in Political Contention:

“Religion in Political Contention: Religious Dimensions in Social Movements, Rebellions, and Revolutions”

For a panel proposal to the Association for the Sociology of Religion 81st Annual Meeting, New York, NY, August 11-13, 2019

While religion is often recognized as a social force that maintains, if not legitimates, the socio-political order, religion has also played a role in rebellions, revolts, social movements, and revolutions. Religion, that is, can play a role in contentious politics. Karl Marx famously suggested that religion is the “opium of the people,” a phrase that is frequently taken out of context and misunderstood. In the same passage, he also wrote religion is “an expression of real suffering and a protest against” it, suggesting that religion is also a source and instrument of social change. Indeed, Marx’s collaborator, Friedrich Engels wrote on essay on the German Peasant Wars focusing on the revolutionary movement led by theologian Thomas Münzer, underscoring the latter point on social change dynamics. Similarly, Max Weber showed us how religion is both a source of domination (traditional or bureaucratic) and social transformation (charismatic, which is revolutionary, but also another type of domination). Even Emile Durkheim, who typically is associated with a status quo oriented theory of religion, makes a case for the transcendent power of religious rituals. Today, too many sociologists of religion continue very conventional modes of thinking – religion is either hegemonic or counter-hegemonic — ignoring how religion is both a hegemonic and counter-hegemonic force in past and contemporary political scenarios.

For this panel, we will invite papers that explore the relationship religion – as a shared cultural system, source of solidarity, and ways of thinking, feeling, and acting – has to social movements, rebellions and revolutions. We are interested in understanding how and under what conditions religion functions as a progressive and/or reactionary force that compels people to challenge or protect the order of things. We are particularly interested in prophetic and messianic movements, secular religions (e.g., The Cult of the Supreme Being and Science as Religion), and liberation theologies. While we welcome contemporary explorations (e.g., popular religion and evangelism in Latin America, the Arab Spring, and resistance to globalization), we also welcome the exploration of past events (e.g., the English, French, Iranian, and Nicaraguan revolutions; Taiping and Boxer Rebellions in China; and the German Peasant Wars of the 16th century). Special consideration will be given to theoretical treatments on the relationship religion has to progressive and/or reactionary politics. Papers that focus on contemporary and historical case studies in the U.S. are welcome. Priority will be given to papers that aim to make sense of the institutional, organizational, ritualistic, discursive (e.g., using the Bible or other sacred texts in discussions), ideological, and/or framing mechanisms that give religion its contentious structure.

Deadline for Paper Proposals: March 1st, 2019

Paper proposals should include name, affiliation, email address, title, and a 200-word abstract describing the paper’s research question, methodology, and preliminary results.

Please send paper proposal in MS Word by e-mail to the panel organizers:

Jean-Pierre Reed, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, reedjp@siu.edu and

Warren S. Goldstein, Center for Critical Research on Religion,
goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org