Free Access: Journal of Muslims in Europe

The academic publisher Brill is making issue 3-1 of the Journal of Muslims in Europe freely available on line. For those who are not yet familiar with the Journal this issue gives a good representation of the journal’s geographical and topical breadth, and it includes a good selection of book reviews.

Please feel free to circulate an announcement among your colleagues and on any relevant mailing list that you can think of. Here’s the direct link to the issue:

There is no end date to the free access and no access code needed.

New Issue: Sociology of Islam Journal, Special Issue on Immigration, Political Economy, & Islam

Sociology of Islam

Editors-in-Chief
Gary Wood,
Virginia Tech
Tugrul Keskin,
Shanghai University

Special Issue on Immigration, Political Economy and Islam

Volume 5, Issue 2-3

Guest Editors: Ray Jureidini and Sari Hanafi

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418

Special Issue on Immigration, Political Economy and Islam

  Research Article

Gulf Response to the Syrian Refugee Crisis

  Research Article

Shari‘ah Law and Capitulations Governing the Non-Muslim Foreign Merchants in the Ottoman Empire

  Research Article

The Socio-economic Aspects of hijra

  Research Article

Islam and Female Migrant Domestic Workers in Qatar

  Research Article

The “Humane Economy”: Migrant Labour and Islam in Qatar and the UAE

  Research Article

The Convergence of Migrants and Refugees


Call for Papers: “Complex Religion: Intersections of Religion and Inequality”

Call for Papers

Special Issue – Social Inclusion

Volume 6, Issue 2

Title: Complex Religion: Intersections of Religion and Inequality

Editor: Melissa J. Wilde (University of Pennsylvania, USA)

Deadline for Abstracts: 15 September 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 31 January 2018
Publication of the Issue: May/June 2018

Information: Although scholars of American religion acknowledge religion’s deep interconnectedness with race, class, and ethnicity in the USA, we nonetheless typically study religion as a factor that is independent from other social structures. Likewise, we rarely systematically examine class, race or gender differences between or within American religious groups. This thematic issue will highlight research that moves beyond these weaknesses by publishing papers that intentionally examine aspects of inequality as they relate to religion. Papers that discuss both theoretical and methodological conundrums (and solutions) are welcome.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal’s editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 15 September 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

Call for Manuscripts on “Interreligious Dialogue: From Religion to Geopolitics”

CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

ANNUAL REVIEW OF THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

Volume 10: Interreligious Dialogue: From Religion to Geopolitics

Forthcoming 2019

Edited by:

Giuseppe Giordan (University of Padua, Italy) and

Andrew P. Lynch (University of Sydney, Australia)

The topic of interreligious dialogue is of critical importance at a time of increasing geopolitical tension. The urgency for developing better analytical tools for understanding interreligious dialogue is underscored by widespread concerns about religion and violence, and the security culture that this has given rise to in a number of nation states. Furthermore, globalization, technological developments, mass migration, and recent political upheavals and the narratives of exclusion that have been associated with them, highlights the need for greater levels of communication between religious groups. This volume seeks to investigate interreligious dialogue as a necessary component of global affairs in post-secular times, and in multi-faith societies facing increasing levels of cultural pluralism.

To explore these issues we propose to include articles on the following themes, from the perspective of a range of different religions:

  1. Changing viewpoints and theories in the study of interreligious dialogue
  2. Interreligious dialogue and politics in the context of globalization
  3. Interreligious dialogue and debates about secularism and post-secularism
  4. Interreligious dialogue in the context of social diversity, cultural pluralism, and multi-faith societies
  5. Interreligious dialogue and emerging information technologies
  6. Interreligious dialogue in an age of terrorism
  7. Interreligious dialogue and migration

Please send all proposals (300 words) to andrew.lynch@sydney.edu.au

Deadlines:

Submission of proposals: July 30, 2017

Notification of acceptance: September 30, 2017

Completed manuscripts (7,000 words): June 30, 2018

Call for Papers: Religion and the Rise of Populism: Migration, Radicalism and New Nationalisms

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/pgas/crss-call-for-papers-religion-rise-populism

The editors of the journal Religion, State and Society are pleased to invite contributions to a special issue, slated for publication in early 2018. The special issue will investigate the roles of religion in recent trends towards populist politics, in particular as manifested in public reactions to migration, the rise of new nationalisms, and the increasing prominence of radicalism.

Growing evidence suggests that these developments are taking centre stage throughout the world, set in a wider context of global political and economic uncertainty. It can also be observed that religion plays an important role in each of these three issues, often in ways that interconnect them. For example, the actions of the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria have exacerbated an already worrisome global migration crisis, while also heightening concerns about violent radicalism.  From France to the Philippines, public anxieties surrounding ISIS and domestic ‘radicalisation’ have become frequent motifs in populist rhetoric that links them with increasing flows of migrants as representative of threats to social security and the economic wellbeing of local populations.

Other examples of contemporary issues in which religion is implicated in populist politics and linked to migration, new nationalisms, and radicalism include: the emphasis on ‘Hindu values’ in the politics of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party in India; the Christian or anti-Muslim rhetoric of American presidential candidates; the UK Brexit campaigners’ use of the prospective membership of ‘Muslim’ Turkey in the EU; the deepening significance of ‘traditionalist’ and pro-Orthodox rhetoric in Russia’s domestic and international politics; and the increasing prominence of religion-based identity politics in Poland, Hungary, and Croatia.

This special issue will seek to probe the various roles of religion in these interlinked issues and across comparative cases. There is an urgent need for considered academic analysis to discern how the rise of populism is connected to religion and the issues of migration, radicalism, and new nationalisms, to elucidate the broader empirical and theoretical implications for our understandings of religion, state, and society.

Areas of investigation can include but are by no means limited to:

  • Religious dimensions of populism in national contexts, including comparative perspectives
  • The migration crisis and its implications for religion-based identity politics in European societies and beyond
  • The ‘crisis’ of the European Union following the Brexit referendum, and its broader implications with relevance to religion
  • Religious dimensions of radicalism: discourses, movements, and politics
  • Religiously-based conservative and traditionalist movements in Europe, the United States, India, Russia, or other parts of the world, including comparative studies
  • Fringe and far-right political and vigilante groups and movements, and their politics of religion
  • Religious dimensions of the securitisation of borders and the ‘othering’ of excluded groups
  • Theoretical, legal, or discourse-based work on the role of religious, such as ‘Christian’ or ‘Hindu’, affinities in constructions of national identity and the operation of national institutions

This special issue of Religion, State and Society is planned for publication in the first half of 2018. The editors have been invited by Routledge to also consider republication of the contributions as a book.

Application Process

Please send completed papers of 6,000-8,000 words by 15 August 2017. To submit a paper, please register for an account and follow the submission instructions at the journal’s online submission portal: http://www.edmgr.com/crss

Before submitting your manuscript please read carefully the journal’s submission instructions, available on the RSS main website under the ‘Instructions for Authors’ page (http://www.tandfonline.com/crss). All manuscripts will go through the normal peer review process.

Questions related to the theme and potential ideas for papers can be discussed with the editors:
Dr Daniel Nilsson DeHanas (daniel.dehanas@kcl.ac.uk)
Dr Marat Shterin (marat.shterin@kcl.ac.uk)

Publishing announcement: Migration and Society

Journal published by Berghahn

Migration is at the heart of the transformation of societies and communities and touches the lives of people across the globe. Migration and Society is a new interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.
Migration and Society addresses both dynamics and drivers of migration; processes of settlement and integration; and transnational practices and diaspora formation. We publish theoretically informed and empirically based articles of the highest quality, especially encouraging work that interrogates and transcends the boundaries between the social sciences and the arts and humanities.
We also welcome articles that reflect on the complexities of both studying and teaching migration, as well as pieces that focus on the relationship between scholarship and the policies and politics of migration.
Submissions are welcome for consideration in one of the five journal sections:
o   Research Articles: Each issue will include articles (max. 8,000 words) addressing a key theme, in addition to a range of other migration-and-society related articles
o   The People & Places section consists of shorter pieces (2,000-4,000 words), including notes from the field, ‘migrant voices’, and interviews with scholars, practitioners, and policymakers
o   The Reflections section invites critical reflections (max. 5,000 words) on migration research and teaching
o   The Creative Encounters section invites poetry, shorter prose pieces, photo essays, and other  engagements with migration
o   Each issue concludes with a Book Reviews section (800 words for single book reviews, 13-1400 words for reviews of two books, 15-1600 words for three books).
 
Migration and Society is edited by Mette Louise Berg (UCL) and Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (UCL).
 
Inaugural issue (publication August 2018)
Hospitality and hostility towards migrants: global perspectives
Recent years have seen an unprecedented scale of global forced migration. Millions of people have fled conflicts and mass human rights violations as well as poverty and persecution. Across sites of transit and settlement migrants have been met by a combination of hospitality and hostility.
For the inaugural issue of Migration and Society, we welcome theoretically and empirically informed contributions that help us develop a more nuanced understanding of the complex responses and experiences of hospitality and hostility around the world and in different historical contexts. We invite contributions that offer critical analyses of the following questions:
1.      How, and why, have different actors responded to the actual, prospective, and imagined arrival of migrants across time and space?
2.      How have migrants and refugees experienced and responded to different, and at times overlapping, processes of hospitality and hostility in sites of transit and settlement?
3.      What are the politics and the poetics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants in different spaces?
4.      As ‘new’ migrants join established diasporas and transnational communities, how have ‘locals’ and ‘established’ migrants and refugees responded to ‘newly’ displaced people?
5.      How, why, and with what effects have diverse media represented processes of migration? Who has been rendered (hyper)visible and audible, and/or invisible, inaudible, and silenced in different representations of migration?
6.      What are the historic resonances, continuities, and discontinuities of contemporary dynamics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants?
We especially welcome articles that examine – and interrogate – the applicability of the concepts of hospitality and hostility in different settings; and that explore the relationship between these and other concepts, including cosmopolitanism, welcome, conviviality, neighbourliness, and solidarity, from the perspective of the global South as well as the North.
 
Deadline for submitting articles for inclusion in issue 1: 30 September 2017.
 

Publication Announcement: Approaching Religion Vol. 7/1 (April, 2017)

Approaching Religion

Available April 2017

Theme: Interreligious dialogue in Asia
Guest Editor: Professor Lionel Obadia

AR is an open access journal published by the Donner Institute. Its
purpose is to publish current research on religion and culture and to
offer a platform for scholarly co-operation and debate within these
fields. The articles have been selected on the basis of peer-review.

Approaching Religion
Vol 7, No 1 (2017)

Table of Contents

Editorial

Religious diversity (1)
Lionel Obadia & Ruth Illman

Review article

Comparing ‘religious diversities’. Looking Eastward: (Asia) beyond the
West (2-9)
Lionel Obadia

Articles

Diversity and elite religiosity in modern China. A model (10-20)
Vincent Goossaert

Religious diversity and patrimonialization. A case study of the Nianli
Festival in Leizhou Peninsula, China (21-31)
Shanshan Zheng

Traditional and modern crossing process exchange in a Buddhist-Muslim
society. Case studied: Zangskar valley in the great Indian Himalayas (32-45)
Salomé Deboos

Becoming Christians. Prayers and subject formation in an urban church in
China (46-54)
Jianbo Huang & Mengyin Hu

Dr Ruth Illman /Dr. Ruth Illman
Föreståndare, Donnerska institutet /Director, the Donner Institute
Docent i religionsvetenskap, Åbo Akademi/ Docent of Comparative Religion, Åbo Akademi University

Publication Announcement: Approaching Religion Vol. 7/1 (April, 2017)

Approaching Religion

Available April 2017

Theme: Interreligious dialogue in Asia
Guest Editor: Professor Lionel Obadia

AR is an open access journal published by the Donner Institute. Its
purpose is to publish current research on religion and culture and to
offer a platform for scholarly co-operation and debate within these
fields. The articles have been selected on the basis of peer-review.

Approaching Religion
Vol 7, No 1 (2017)

Table of Contents

Editorial

Religious diversity (1)
Lionel Obadia & Ruth Illman

Review article

Comparing ‘religious diversities’. Looking Eastward: (Asia) beyond the
West (2-9)
Lionel Obadia

Articles

Diversity and elite religiosity in modern China. A model (10-20)
Vincent Goossaert

Religious diversity and patrimonialization. A case study of the Nianli
Festival in Leizhou Peninsula, China (21-31)
Shanshan Zheng

Traditional and modern crossing process exchange in a Buddhist-Muslim
society. Case studied: Zangskar valley in the great Indian Himalayas (32-45)
Salomé Deboos

Becoming Christians. Prayers and subject formation in an urban church in
China (46-54)
Jianbo Huang & Mengyin Hu

Dr Ruth Illman /Dr. Ruth Illman
Föreståndare, Donnerska institutet /Director, the Donner Institute
Docent i religionsvetenskap, Åbo Akademi/ Docent of Comparative Religion, Åbo Akademi University

“Sociology of Islam” journal enters its 4th year

Greetings from Istanbul. 2017 will be our 4th year and we appreciate your support and activity as part of the mailing list. So far, we have published 16 issues including three ‘special issues.’ We are happy to accept articles related with the Sociology of Islam and Sociology of the Middle East which are related directly with the topics of inequality, social movements, political sociology, religion, nationalism and ethnicity, modernity, work and labor, criminology, aging, environment, health, deviance, sexuality, education, and social change. For your submission, we accept articles from 8000–12.000 words in length. If you have any questions or concerns please do not hesitate to contact me, Gary Wood or other members of the editorial board. Additionally, we are open to special issue proposals, please email your ideas to us!

You can submit your article to the following website: http://www.editorialmanager.com/SOI/default.aspx

or send it to us for a prescreening process.   

Please remember that this is not a religious studies journal! All submissions must be related with the themes of Sociology of Islam and the Middle East.      

Our special issues can be found at the following website pages:

The Gülen Movement (Volume 1, Issue 3-4, 2014 )

A Guest editor: Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland.

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/1/3-4

Contemporary Social Movements in the Middle East and Beyond, 2014 (Volume 2,  Issue 3-4, 2014)

A Guest editor: Mojtaba Mahdavi, University of Alberta

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/2/3-4

China, Islam and Middle East (Volume 4, Issue 1-2, 2016)

A Guest editor: Tugrul Keskin, Shanghai University

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418/4/1-2

SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM:

http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/sociology-islam

Editorial Board

Editors-in-Chief
Gary Wood, Virginia Tech
Tugrul Keskin, Shanghai University
Assistant Editors
Sara Swetzoff, Howard University
Michael McCall, American University of Beirut
Associate Editors
Rachel Rinaldo, University of Colorado-Boulder
Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland
Isabel David, University of Lisbon
Mark Gould, Haverford College
Sari Hanafi, American University of Beirut
Sean Foley, Middle Tennessee State University
Book Reviews Editor:
Joshua Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland

Call for Papers: Special Issue: Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Invitation to the Special Issue of Central and Eastern European Migration Review

Religion and Gender in Migration to and from Central and Eastern Europe

Guest editors:

Katarzyna Leszczyńska, Faculty of Humanities, AGH University of Science and Technology

Sylwia Urbańska, Institute of Sociology, University of Warsaw

Katarzyna Zielińska, Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University

Despite the dynamic development of migration studies in recent decades, the interplay between gender and religion in their impact on migratory processes and related social phenomenahas not so far become a subject of systematic and in-depth research and reflection.This omission can be traced back to the fact that both gender and religion were ‘latecomers’ to the field of migration studies, because they became a subject of systematic analysis only in the 1980s.At the same time, questions relating to interactions between gender, religion and migration are becoming more and more pressing in the light of growing glocalisation and transnationalism, and dramatically intensifying migratory processes, especially migration of persons seeking refugee status from wars and social conflicts.The existing gap in research results in a lack of systematic knowledge of how gendered religious identities and practices as well as religious culture, institutions, and organisationsshape migration flows, motivations,migrant diversified activitiesand migration regimes.

The proposed Special Issue aims at filling this gap in the existing research. Moreover, due to the peculiarity of the CEE region,we regard the question ofthe interplay between gender, religion and migration as being particularly interesting. The culture of most CEE countries, despite post-socialist socioeconomic and political transformations and social change resulting from mass migration, can still be characterised as homogeneous and attached to traditional, conservative gendered values. This conservative shade of the culture is often further strengthened by the influential public role of religion (e.g. the high status and power of the Roman Catholic Church in Poland or Orthodox Church in Romania) and by the low level of secularisation (i.e. prevalence of religious practices and beliefs, support for conservative social values).

The Special Issue will focus on the following topics and general research questions:

  1. How does the interplay between gender and religion influence the migratory experience? How doesreligion shapethe individual and collective experience of migrants, in particular, with regard to the formation of their genderedsocial, class, ethnic, civic and work identities and practices? How do various religious traditions construct and reproduce the gender rules in the symbolic, institutional and experiential dimensions of migration?
  2. How does the activity of religious organisationsand their personnel contribute to creation of various forms of capital supporting (or inhibiting) migrants’ adaptation, integration, andmulticultural identity? How do religious organisations mediate migrants’ adaptation to their new social conditions? How do religious organisationsform bonds and networks of relationships between the cultures of the country of origin and country of settlement?

  3. How (if at all) do the gender patterns and identities embedded in religious organisations transform in various migratory contexts? In which directions do the institutional rules concerning the place of men and women characteristic of conservative gender orders changeas a consequence of migrationinvolvingencounters with multicultural and secular socio-cultural environments as well as with more conservative ones?

We also invite contributions focusing on other topics related to the interaction between religion, gender and migration, because the main purpose of this Special Issue is to showthe recent developments in research on this broad topic in the context of migration to and from theCEE region.

Submission guidelines and related deadlines

10 January 2017 –submission of abstracts

30 March 2017 – submission of articles

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be sent to: ceemr@uw.edu.pl.

Please note that each article will be subject to a double-blind peer review process and positive reviews will be a condition for the publication.

Guidelines for submission can be found at:www.ceemr.uw.edu.pl/sites/default/files/Instructions_to_authors_5.07.2013_final_2.pdf.

For more information on the Central and Eastern European Migration Review,please visitwww.ceemr.uw.edu.pl.